I Know I Will Quit Again

I Know I Will Quit Again

Joel
Joel

February 22nd, 2001, 7:17 pm #1

Joel's Reinforcement Library


I Know I Will Quit Again

"I don't know what happened. I just went back to smoking. But I know I will quit again." I often encounter similar remarks from people who relapse to smoking. While the smoker may not recognize what led to the relapse, the reason is obvious to anyone understanding addiction. The person took a drag on a cigarette.

While the situation that causes the first puff varies, the end result is inevitably the same. The first puff causes a second. It may be a minute, a day or even a week later. In some extreme cases even a longer time will pass. But the length of time is not important. The addictive process has been set into motion. Either the smoker becomes hooked immediately or gets a false sense of confidence leading to another drag, and still another. Eventually the addiction will be reinforced, and once again the smoker is hooked to the deadly substance--nicotine.

So what about the idea that the smoker will just quit again some other time? There are two flaws in this concept. First, the smoker may never again get the desire, strength or opportunity to quit. When dealing with deadly substances, death may result and, sometimes, without advance warning.

But, often, the smoker does have the opportunity to quit again. The only problem is that if he didn't understand what prompted relapse the first time, the odds are he will make the same mistake again. Once again he will face the same problem--addicted and unable to quit smoking.

If a person is enslaved in this process of on-again-off-again smoking, he must take time to consider what his particular problem is. His past attempts failed because he refused to treat cigarette smoking as an addiction. It is said that those who don't learn from their mistakes are doomed to repeat them. Nowhere is this more evident than in dealing with addictions. If he doesn't consider the consequences of taking the first puff, he will take it. And once again his noble attempt will be wasted.

Smokers and ex-smokers must learn from their own or better yet from other people's mistakes. Quitting smoking is worthwhile if you are able to stay off. All the physical, psychological, social and financial benefits will last only as long as you remain free of cigarettes. If you don't smoke now, great! You understand your addiction. If you do smoke now, quit. You too will overcome the powerful grip of nicotine. Then, all you need to remember to stay permanently free is NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!



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Last edited by Joel on June 19th, 2013, 12:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joel

February 22nd, 2001, 7:19 pm #2

From: Deb Sent: 6/11/2000 11:18 PM 1 of 10
Joel, I just finished the above subject. And since I've become an ex-smoker again I've been trying to look at why my last 10 year quit didn't stay. Your subjeact here hit it right on the head. I still didn't think I was an addicted. You see 10years ago I went to a Christain Girls Home that didn't allow smoking. So I get off the bus after traveling half way across the country and I'm asked for my cigerettes and lighter. I said my good-byes and that was it. They kept you busy there form the time you got up untill it was time for bed. So you didn't have much time to think about them or have time for trigger to hit you. Anyway I realized I quit then because I had to not because I wanted to. It was either follow the rules or your gone. And I had no where to go. This quit has been so different. I now realize that I am an addict and will be the rest of my life. But it's something I want to do not be forced to do. Thirty years ago you never heard of addiction to cigerettes. To street drugs, RX drugs, alcohol yes, but not cigerettes. I'm so glad I now know the truth. I see now how the nicodemon is trying to stay in control of my life by using the triggers. I shared with one of the managers today that now when the nicodemon comes call this a trigger I get angry not at myself but at him for thinking I'd even want anything to do with him. At this point all's I have to do is think of how I look with a killerette in my mouth and I'm ready for War. You see the triggers have been very difficult for me the last couple of days. I was letting them get me upset but not giving in. I realize this is passive behavior something I've had a problem with in my past, but no more. I realize I have a choice, I can get walked on by the nicodemon or I can stand my ground. And maybe if needed get aggressive with him. (tell him off) I know that life will throw curve balls from time to time. But I'm going to stand my ground because I want to not because I have to. I have been Quit for: 3W 1D 22h 46m 25s. I have NOT smoked 917, for a savings of $127.59. Life Saved: 3D 4h 25m
From: Joel (Mgr) Sent: 6/12/2000 8:52 AM 2 of 10
Hello Deb:

I only have a few minutes here so I only have a chance for a brief reply. I once has a woman come into a clinic who had quit for 10 years before relapsing. She knew how she quit before but it wasn't a real option this time. I think she was married now and when she had quit she joined a convent as a nun. As soon as she left the convent is when she went back to smoking.

This shows the importance of quitting for a good reason, and in fact, for many good reasons. Sometimes if you quit because of one issue, the quit will last only as long as the issue is pertinent. If you quit for numerous reasons, even if for some reason situations change in respect to one, all the others are still intact.

The real trick in smoking cessation is not just getting off smoking, it's being able to stay off of smoking. That is accomplished by keeping your resolve up-that is accomplished by keeping your reasons for wanting to quit and the reasons for wanting to stay off in the forefront of consciousness.

Quitting smoking was a good decision. Staying quit is also a good, day by day decision. It has its ups and downs, or really, just at a few isolated times things seem to get a bit hairy. But smoking, when really analyzed, just had a lot of downs. And in the end, smoking can lead to one big down-it could cripple and kill you. Its worth putting up with the inconveniences that not smoking seems to sometimes pose to avoid the inconveniences smoking often poses. Neither side seems perfect, but the side you are on now will get better and better, the other side would only get worse.

Hang in there Deb. If anything I can ever do to help, don't hesitate to get in touch.

Joel
From: Deb Sent: 6/13/2000 1:05 AM 3 of 10
Joel, Thank you for your orginal post. I really needed to see for myself what the situation was. You posted it just at the right time. As for your reply, your right having one reason is not enough. Espeacially if that one reason could change. It leaves a large open door. I see in my case I was rebelling. Now that I'm alittle older and not in a rebellious stage any longer I realize I've only been hurting myself. My quit now still stands on my walk with God. But,also included is my health. I now have nurmerous health problems that worsen when smoking. I'm tired of being sick. I'm tired of being out of breath. I hate to be putting a mask over my face at night to keep my air way open. I could go on and on but I think you get the picture. I've been on a slow process of trying to destroy myself. No more. I've had it. I choose to live. Thank-you for being here. And I will ask for help when I need it. But I also want to be able to help someone else. In helping someone else I find that it's making me stronger. God Bless You and All You Do
From: Joel (Mgr) Sent: 7/5/2000 6:04 AM 4 of 10
The message often given by other boards, family, friends, doctors, most smoking programs is "don't let a slip put you back to smoking." Like the smoker has an option. A slip is either going to put you back to smoking or put you back to withdrawaling. Both options stink, although one is a lot worse than the other. One can kill you.

Forget the mindset of "don't let a slip put you back to smoking." Change the message to "DON'T SLIP!" This attitude is the only one that is going to make this quit your last quit.
From: Joel (Mgr) Sent: 10/9/2000 6:43 AM 5 of 10
From: sweetie Sent: 11/29/2000 11:40 PM 6 of 10
What you said is sooooo true and it is the one thing that keep me from ever picking up another cigarette. I KNOW beyond a shadow of a doubt that if I ever take another puff Ill be HOOKED again! I am a recovering addict and I know that now.I can't do that to myself or mey daughter...I have come TOOOO far to turn back now! Realizing that I was an addict has given me power to control my addiction! 1 month, 1 week, 6 days, 21 hours and 38 minutes SMOLE FREE!!!!

Sweetie
From: GrumpyOMrsS (mgr) Sent: 1/5/2001 6:44 AM 7 of 10
or, Joel.......that one puff....not only has the great potential to send you back to the arms of the deadliest of the addictions.......that one puff has the ability to kill.

as I get further down the road of freedom.....I wonder how in the world I ever let myself continue such a terrible assault on my body. When I see others smoke....I look at them and the fear I have of ever taking another puff becomes even stronger.

I made a vow a year ago.....that I would never take another puff.....and am I ever glad. I have seen first hand what taking that puff has done to others......and I will not allow it to happen to me. My quit is very precious and there is NO way I would jeopardize it by taking that one puff.

Linda......after smoking 41 years........one year free!

From: Joel (Mgr) Sent: 1/5/2001 9:45 AM 8 of 10
Yes Linda, that is the attitude that made it possible for you to make a year, and that keep it possible to make it the rest of your life a day at a time as long as you choose. Everyone can achieve success as long as they never take another puff!

Joel
From: Succeeding Sent: 1/5/2001 3:06 PM 9 of 10
I am so glad that I found this post! It was just what I needed to hear to help me maintain my resolve! Can I ever relate. I am so glad I am not actively enslaved to tobacco addiction!

Succeeding with over 1 month free from coughing, sneezing, & wheezing
From: kabimbus Sent: 1/8/2001 3:06 PM 10 of 10
Joel, Thanks for that it home also. i am pleased to say still no puffs since 12-14-00. No sneezing, coughing or gagging!. The smell is also out of my house now!!! Things taste better and smell better
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Joel
Joel

March 4th, 2001, 8:14 pm #3

Hello everyone:

I know we have a couple of people who have recently returned to Freedom who do seem serious and recognize their past mistake so I don't want this letter or others I bring up to be interpreted as chastising them. But for every one person who relapses and returns and succeeds, I am afraid that there are many many more who relapse and we never meet them again. And then there are those who we may meet over and over again but still they do not quit. I have had a few people in a lot of clinics. One woman came to 13 of my clinics and pretty much every other Chicago based program for many years before her quit finally took. I have had one man who came to my program more than that, I think it was 15 times and to this day is still a smoker. Think about this. The first lady had to go through 13 withdrawals with me and I don't even know the count of other withdrawal periods she went through with others. And the man has been in one full blown withdrawal after another and still has another he has to go through yet may never have the opportunity to do it again.

So I want everyone to understand the importance of making this quit your last quit. You don't want to take the chance of a relapse because you honestly don't know whether you will have the strength, desire, or worst of all, the opportunity to quit again. You also don't know that even if you quit again, that something didn't start during the interim smoking period between two quits. Again, were not saying that you know something will go wrong such as an initiation of an irreversible fatal diseases, you just can't say that you know something like this won't happen. We can't change our past. We can't alter what we did ten or twenty years ago, or for that fact, ten or twenty seconds ago. But we can alter our future by focusing on our present. So stay focused on today, on the concept that you are glad to be an ex-smoker and want to stay that way for now. Your joining here and your still being here to read this illustrates the fact that you don't want to be a smoker any more. It shows that to us, but more important, it should show that fact to yourself. You don't want to be a smoker. The way to make your wants stay a reality then is to always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joel

March 12th, 2001, 3:00 am #4

For Mari, or more importantly, for everyone who read Mari's post. The post just above this one explains the importance of learning from others mistakes. I think Mari's own post gets the point across very eloquently about learning from her relapse instead of learning from your own. In between appointments, will check back later tonight. Hang in there everyone. Remember quitting smoking is a fight for your health and your life. To win that fight always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joel

July 16th, 2001, 6:50 pm #5

Disregard the common teaching of "don't let a slip put you back to smoking." Replace it with the thought "DON'T SLIP!" A "slip" is a relapse, clear and simple. If you substitute the real word then the sentence would read, "Don't let a relapse put you back to smoking." The fact is a relapse means you have gone back to smoking. A relapse means you either have to go through quitting again or just smoke again until it cripples and kills you, or the worst case scenerio, you end up doing both. Quitting over and over again, suffering one withdrawal after another until one day something goes wrong and quitting no longer even makes a difference--you are already terminal or dead.

There is one solution to this cycle and one solution only. That is to stay free and save your health and likely your life you must never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joel

July 27th, 2001, 7:53 pm #6

For Daniella who is tired of hearing people say don't worry about a slip. I wonder if these people would say to a recovering alcoholic, "Don't worry about a drink," to a recovering heroin addict, "Don't worry about a little injection," or to a severely depressed suicidal patient standing on a ledge, "Don't worry if you just jump this one time." The end result of these actions can all be the same as a relapse to smoking--returning to a problem with life threatening consequences and maybe never getting another chance to rectify it.

To avoid this on again off again cycle of smoking and quitting just remember this time to never take another puff!

Joel
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charlieann (green)
charlieann (green)

August 30th, 2001, 9:47 am #7

I love this thread. I't can't be stressed enough that you can't ever take another puff, because if you do, in all likelyhood you will smoke unitl it kills you. As I stated before this is not my first quit, I had an 8 year quit and then 3 years following that a nine month quit. I'm on my 35th day today and I have finally learned that I will have to be aware and on gaurd for the rest of my life. I was working behind the bar at a wedding a few weeks ago, it was smoke free, and a couple came up and asked that I not clear off their table as they were going outside to smoke. And I mentioned that I won't have to join them because I had quit a couple weeks prior. And the man who was probaly around 50 told me that he had quit for 15 years, He went 15 years without a puff and last new years eve he had a small cigar. And that was it, he's back to 2 packs a day, it's like the 15 years never happened. We are powerless over this addiction no matter how long we go without giving into it, we have to remember that always and never ever put anything containing nicotine on or into our body. I'm thinking of getting a tatoo on my forehead that says "Hey Charlotte, remember, you can't smoke.
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Joel
Joel

October 18th, 2001, 8:59 pm #8

Yesterday I was talking on the phone to one of my current clinic participants who was talking to a smoking friend and asking her how she has tried to quit. She has tried everything imaginable, patches, gums, accupuncture, hypnosis, etc. She actually had quit once for 6 months through a program. When my clinic participant asked her about what program, it turned out to be with me back in 1984. She was successful until she took a puff. Now, 17 years later and after countless attempts she is still only talking about quitting.

Three months ago I had a man in my clinic who had also quit smoking with me for over a year before relapsing, also about 18 years ago. He finally came back in July and has been off since. When we calculated how many cigarettes he smoked after that relapse it was a staggering 164,000.

Don't play mind games with the attitude that if you go back to smoking you will just quit again. You don't know that you will ever get the strength, desire or opportunity to quit again. Make this quit the last quit--all it entails is knowing now to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joel

November 12th, 2001, 9:06 pm #9

For Melissa:

This one illustrates the issue that the fear of a relapse needs to be more than "just" having to quit again, it needs to be the fear that a person may not be able to quit again. That is the bigger problem. Both problems have the same solution though--to never have to worry about attempting to quit again just never have to need to quit again by never going back--and all that entails now is knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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mirigirl (silver)
mirigirl (silver)

January 9th, 2002, 6:55 pm #10

I honest to God - don't think I could quit again.
I just feel so battered and broken by this addiction I really don't think I could muster any enthusiasm, or enough self-worth to even try. I think I would just smoke myself to death.

So I had better hang onto this quit. It has to be my last - otherwise there is no hope for me. So I'm focusing on the positive and just trying to do the suggested things - like read and post and most of all

Never Take Another Puff
yqs
mirigirl
1 week 1 day Free
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Joel
Joel

January 9th, 2002, 7:31 pm #11

Hello Mirigirl:

Its funny, you will hear many people say and feel sentiments like this the first few weeks into a quit. But over time many lose this feeling and start to think that quitting was no big deal. If ever asked how it was to quit they may even say that it was no big deal and begin to think that if they were ever to go back, they would just quit again. This is a form of complacency and complacency has killed many a quits.

An ex-smoker can get to the point that he or she looks back at smoking as being vile, disgusting, expensive, stupid, crazy, and many other derogatory terms. He or she may think that with what he or she knows and understands now that there is absolutely no way he or she could return to such an unwanted lifestyle. The ex-smoker then knows he or she is secure forever from relapsing--and then the final piece of the illogical puzzle falls into place--that if he or she hates smoking so much, and there is no way he or she will return to smoking--well then a puff here and there can't be a big deal because he or she is so resolute to remain smoke free. That is where the story often tragically ends.

Always remember these feeling of despair of the control of the addiction that you are expressing today. You are absolutely correct, you don't know that you have another quit in you. But we know for a fact that you have this one going right now and I suspect you are pretty sure you can make this one last through the rest of the day. This is the one you want to cultivate now for it is likely the one that has the best chance to work and it is definitely the one that has the best chance of avoiding the potentially lethal consequences of smoking.

For if this quit didn't take but maybe a few months from now or a few years from now the next one would, you still don't know that one of the cigarettes you smoked in that intervening time period didn't start up some deadly irreversible process. This factor again is another reason that you should do everything in your power to make this quit stick. To make this quit the quit that sticks and saves your health and your life always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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mirigirl (silver)
mirigirl (silver)

January 9th, 2002, 8:02 pm #12

Thanks Joel
yqs mirigirl
another nicotine addict
1 week 2 days Free
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marty (gold)
marty (gold)

January 9th, 2002, 9:03 pm #13

Joel, I think that last post of yours is even more powerful than the original in this thread.

I have often pondered how it is possible for members here, knowing all that they know about smoking, hating it as much as they do, can possibly relapse. Your second paragraph explains it perfectly. "...if he or she hates smoking so much, and there is no way he or she will return to smoking--well then a puff here and there can't be a big deal because he or she is so resolute to remain smoke free". Oh boy, I feel that the scales have fallen from my eyes.

This means that a relapser simply does not believe the Law of Addiction, they believe they can control their smoking, they believe they are the exception to the rule simply because their hatred of smoking will prevent them becoming actively addicted again. But this would be to suggest that addiction is a psychological problem, when in fact it is a strictly physical problem. Maybe there is something wrong with the way we explain addiction, or maybe we just don't have enough scientific knowledge to explain it better than we do.
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Joel
Joel

January 9th, 2002, 11:42 pm #14

Hello Marty:



Yes I think it was more powerful than the original post too. Actually I feel there are numerous strings that get brought up at times where the responses often offer more insight and important information than the original posts. I hope that people look over the longer strings to see the information in the responses.



As far as the physical vs. psychological aspect of the thread, well basically addiction is a physical problem that by its very nature creates psychological patterns and habits that exert influence once the actual physical need for nicotine is nonexistent. Giving into one of those triggers then reinstates the full physical need again. So in essence, the addiction creates the habit. Once the addiction is brought under control, the old habits still have the ability to trigger a thought. If an ex-smokers guard is down one of these triggers can cause them to take a drag. That action will cause a reinstatement of the nicotine abstinence syndrome and it's associated withdrawals. Now they are basically in a full blown drug relapse. This again is the physical addiction returned in all its glory spinning off the old habits again. It's a vicious and deadly cycle--one that an ex-smoker has only one way to prevent from ever starting again--which is to never take another puff!



Joel
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mirigirl (silver)
mirigirl (silver)

January 10th, 2002, 3:57 am #15

OK Guys - I'm scared now!!
Scared of relapse (again!) - scared of complacency - scared of being over-confident!
And maybe I need to be. My LAST quit here is very precious to me - as I'm sure it is for everyone.
I'm trying to get my head around what yous are saying: that an-ex-smoker can be so confident in their quit - and disgusted by smoking - that thinking the law of addiction doesn't apply to them - they pick up a cigarette!! Oh God - how do I make sure that doesn't happen to me??
I've been reading the Board everyday - and watching all the people turn Gold - and congratulations to all of you - and part of me thinks well - that could have been me if I had kept my quit! But it's not and I have to accept that and be happy and inspired by others.
Then there's the newer people to Freedom - some relapsing already - and that scares me!! So I gotta look out for myself and hang with the folks who really want recovery here! (Stick with the strength as they say)
Can you be scared and have some confidence in yourself at the same time??
Oh I think I just answered my own question: How do I make sure relapse from over-confidence doesn't happen to me? By Never Taking Another Puff!!
Hanging close-not puffing!
yqs mirigirl
1 week 2 days Free
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NPannie
NPannie

January 10th, 2002, 5:09 am #16

Dear Mirigirl,

Yep, you are right on! You answered your own question. Never take another puff and you will continue on living a smoke free life. It is the only way for us addicts to defeat the addiction - we have to never pick up a cig again. Most of my family smokes, so these darn cigs have been around while I've been going thru this change in my life. I can remember about 3 months into my quit, I picked up a pack out of curiousity that someone had left laying around, and I swear, an electric jolt pulsed thru my arm and I dropped them really quickly. I knew that I couldn't have just 1, not even just 1 puff. Only 1 zillion if I ever light up again.

You never can quit too soon. Hang on to this nice smelling, better way of life - it gets easier and easier to not want those smokes. Just make it thru this minute, hour, day, and then pat yourself on the back tomorrow morning for a job well done! Distraction is helpful early on - if the thought strikes, find something else to occupy yourself. Just do not pick up a nasty cig!

Hang in there - you can do it! Sending a big hug your way,
YQS,
Nancy
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Juanjuanjuanjuanjuan200
Juanjuanjuanjuanjuan200

July 21st, 2002, 10:39 pm #17

A few months ago I went to the doctor. It turnded out I had not the 20 illnesses my hipocondriac self keeps telling me to suffer. The doctor said you have to stop smoking. And made a worriesome face, in silence. I got exams I never had to do ever in my long, still young, and smokers life. His face, my feelings, my new digestive problem, my conscience told me to seek and accept that cigarette was killing me, and that that thing could happen as johns. As the one described above. Soon, or too early, too soon.

I ve smoked since my 16 years, so ( How should one said?, was a smoker, is an exsmoker, "had been" has a continuity that scares me)...so I smoked for 26 minus 3 years of a quit that I lost. 3 years of a quit and lost it easily, so easily, having to spend 8 years of a ****, of low self esteem, being convinced that I was weak not being able to fight and get rid of an addiction, that I my self had already beaten. I spare to you how the related illnesses and personal disasters that I blame on me, or on me having a problem, have shaped my life on the last 8 years.

I am not presuming of not having problems since I quit, I am saving to my shrink the big ones. I understand that I am here at freedom to quit, to keep this quit. I undestand that relapse is a monster, a devil, a mistake, a life threatening action, a self destroing behaviour. But it could look to me as a party, a joy, a minute of happiness, a success, a wonderful dream because I am an addict. And whatever that scary word means, is sure it will produce on me a total relapse, a full 25 cigarrettes a day season of who knows how many years long. No please. Not for today at least. I will never take another puff. Ni una calada más.


Juan
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

August 10th, 2002, 8:54 pm #18

Noni, at age 32, and Bryan, at age 33, both
thought that there was plenty of time left too!
Click their photos to read their stories
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Joel
Joel

September 13th, 2002, 6:28 am #19

For Freebird:

Or maybe more importantly for anyone reading Freebird's post and thinks to himself or herself that if he or she relapses, he or she will "simply" quit again. Everyone here must always do everything he or she can do to keep this quit going--there is no guarantee that you have another quit in you. The only guarantee when it comes to quitting smoking is that you will stay free as long as you always stay committed to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joel

March 12th, 2003, 5:07 am #20

For CF:

Make sure to read the one right above this one. (Post 50)
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ComicForces GOLD
ComicForces GOLD

March 12th, 2003, 5:22 am #21

Thanks so much Joel.... That story touched me and hit me hard the first time I read it.... I read it again, will keep reading it, and will keep in mind.

The fact that we may not be capable of starting a "NEXT QUIT" until years and years later is a very scary concept.

Why ruin what we have already accomplished? (Don't ask me why I'm using the term "we" instead of "me"....)

thank you for the reminder, and for reading my post.
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kate2000
kate2000

March 19th, 2004, 1:22 am #22

Hello everyone,
Im so glad to have this site, I read lot from here. not much into the posting. After reading this one I feel I have to reply. My husband and I quite smoking 2 yrs ago, he started smoking again , about 5mth in to our quite. I started again after a yr and a half into it, after the summer I found this site and quite again for the last time ( I do hear what Joel says here, I don't know if I have another quite in me)
The more I read on here, the more I resent my husband for not quiting, I'm getting very worried that he wont be around for all the things he is planning in his life. I don't what to nag him about quiteing. I just am beginnibg to think that he is very selfish (sp) , and would rather smoke and shorten his life the spend it with us. I'm feeling very torn here. I luv him very much, and to watch him do this to himself and us......well is tearing me apart.
The more I read on here the more, the more I resent him, but I need to read for my quite, I just think of the money we could be saveing for a trip, stopping the movie so he can smoke, it is getting to me...........please help.............Kate
I 'ts been 2mth 2 weeks for me
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

April 12th, 2004, 8:05 pm #23


We're told that this addiction to smoking nicotine claims half of all adult smokers. We're told that roughly five million of us will pay the ultimate price in 2004. We're told that the average price will be somewhere in the neighborhood of 5,000 days of life. We're told that for each of us who smoke ourselves to death each year that about 20 others are already living inside bodies that have been permanently diseased by our addiction. We're told that breaking nicotine's grip can be harder than quitting heroin or cocaine. We know that the total price we're been paying for this amazing chemical is sick.

But we now also know the law of addiction, we know what we're up against. We know that no subconscious crave episode will last longer than 3 minutes, that all that matters is the next few minutes and that each is within our ability to command. We know that the glory and dopamine ahhhhh achievement sensation that will flow following our next victory will have been earned and is 100% ours to enjoy. We know it's a healthy sign that life, not nicotine, is once again determining flow of more than 200 neurochemicals inside our mind and body.

There's no need to engage in playing complicated false rationalization and minimization games inside our conscious mind. Instead, we can embrace moving through each challenge to sample the fruit of victory beyond. You're going home and there is no force, location, emotion or circumstance on earth that can again compel you to put nicotine inside your brain. Today is all that matters and the healing it reflects is yours for the taking. Only one rule, no nicotine today - Never Take Another Puff! John
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NSMBill
NSMBill

August 28th, 2004, 2:02 am #24

Has there been any studies on the effects of on-again-off-again smokers? Surely the shock of starting, quitting, starting, etc. must do something to the body. And does the relapsed smoker enjoy any benefits at all from having gone a month or year without smoking?
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

October 14th, 2004, 1:45 am #25

Once you have quit smoking, understand your very life is contingent on understanding the importance of knowing to never take another puff!
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