I Know I Will Quit Again

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

09 Jan 2002, 19:31 #11

Hello Mirigirl:

Its funny, you will hear many people say and feel sentiments like this the first few weeks into a quit. But over time many lose this feeling and start to think that quitting was no big deal. If ever asked how it was to quit they may even say that it was no big deal and begin to think that if they were ever to go back, they would just quit again. This is a form of complacency and complacency has killed many a quits.

An ex-smoker can get to the point that he or she looks back at smoking as being vile, disgusting, expensive, stupid, crazy, and many other derogatory terms. He or she may think that with what he or she knows and understands now that there is absolutely no way he or she could return to such an unwanted lifestyle. The ex-smoker then knows he or she is secure forever from relapsing--and then the final piece of the illogical puzzle falls into place--that if he or she hates smoking so much, and there is no way he or she will return to smoking--well then a puff here and there can't be a big deal because he or she is so resolute to remain smoke free. That is where the story often tragically ends.

Always remember these feeling of despair of the control of the addiction that you are expressing today. You are absolutely correct, you don't know that you have another quit in you. But we know for a fact that you have this one going right now and I suspect you are pretty sure you can make this one last through the rest of the day. This is the one you want to cultivate now for it is likely the one that has the best chance to work and it is definitely the one that has the best chance of avoiding the potentially lethal consequences of smoking.

For if this quit didn't take but maybe a few months from now or a few years from now the next one would, you still don't know that one of the cigarettes you smoked in that intervening time period didn't start up some deadly irreversible process. This factor again is another reason that you should do everything in your power to make this quit stick. To make this quit the quit that sticks and saves your health and your life always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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mirigirl (silver)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

09 Jan 2002, 20:02 #12

Thanks Joel
yqs mirigirl
another nicotine addict
1 week 2 days Free
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marty (gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

09 Jan 2002, 21:03 #13

Joel, I think that last post of yours is even more powerful than the original in this thread.

I have often pondered how it is possible for members here, knowing all that they know about smoking, hating it as much as they do, can possibly relapse. Your second paragraph explains it perfectly. "...if he or she hates smoking so much, and there is no way he or she will return to smoking--well then a puff here and there can't be a big deal because he or she is so resolute to remain smoke free". Oh boy, I feel that the scales have fallen from my eyes.

This means that a relapser simply does not believe the Law of Addiction, they believe they can control their smoking, they believe they are the exception to the rule simply because their hatred of smoking will prevent them becoming actively addicted again. But this would be to suggest that addiction is a psychological problem, when in fact it is a strictly physical problem. Maybe there is something wrong with the way we explain addiction, or maybe we just don't have enough scientific knowledge to explain it better than we do.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

09 Jan 2002, 23:42 #14

Hello Marty:



Yes I think it was more powerful than the original post too. Actually I feel there are numerous strings that get brought up at times where the responses often offer more insight and important information than the original posts. I hope that people look over the longer strings to see the information in the responses.



As far as the physical vs. psychological aspect of the thread, well basically addiction is a physical problem that by its very nature creates psychological patterns and habits that exert influence once the actual physical need for nicotine is nonexistent. Giving into one of those triggers then reinstates the full physical need again. So in essence, the addiction creates the habit. Once the addiction is brought under control, the old habits still have the ability to trigger a thought. If an ex-smokers guard is down one of these triggers can cause them to take a drag. That action will cause a reinstatement of the nicotine abstinence syndrome and it's associated withdrawals. Now they are basically in a full blown drug relapse. This again is the physical addiction returned in all its glory spinning off the old habits again. It's a vicious and deadly cycle--one that an ex-smoker has only one way to prevent from ever starting again--which is to never take another puff!



Joel
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mirigirl (silver)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

10 Jan 2002, 03:57 #15

OK Guys - I'm scared now!!
Scared of relapse (again!) - scared of complacency - scared of being over-confident!
And maybe I need to be. My LAST quit here is very precious to me - as I'm sure it is for everyone.
I'm trying to get my head around what yous are saying: that an-ex-smoker can be so confident in their quit - and disgusted by smoking - that thinking the law of addiction doesn't apply to them - they pick up a cigarette!! Oh God - how do I make sure that doesn't happen to me?? Image
I've been reading the Board everyday - and watching all the people turn Gold - and congratulations to all of you Image- and part of me thinks well - that could have been me if I had kept my quit! But it's not and I have to accept that and be happy and inspired by others.
Then there's the newer people to Freedom - some relapsing already - and that scares me!! Image So I gotta look out for myself and hang with the folks who really want recovery here! (Stick with the strength as they say)
Can you be scared and have some confidence in yourself at the same time??
Oh I think I just answered my own question: How do I make sure relapse from over-confidence doesn't happen to me? ImageBy Never Taking Another Puff!!
Hanging close-not puffing!Image
yqs mirigirl
1 week 2 days Free
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NPannie
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:55

10 Jan 2002, 05:09 #16

Dear Mirigirl,

Yep, you are right on! You answered your own question. Never take another puff and you will continue on living a smoke free life. It is the only way for us addicts to defeat the addiction - we have to never pick up a cig again. Most of my family smokes, so these darn cigs have been around while I've been going thru this change in my life. I can remember about 3 months into my quit, I picked up a pack out of curiousity that someone had left laying around, and I swear, an electric jolt pulsed thru my arm and I dropped them really quickly. I knew that I couldn't have just 1, not even just 1 puff. Only 1 zillion if I ever light up again.

You never can quit too soon. Hang on to this nice smelling, better way of life - it gets easier and easier to not want those smokes. Just make it thru this minute, hour, day, and then pat yourself on the back tomorrow morning for a job well done! Distraction is helpful early on - if the thought strikes, find something else to occupy yourself. Just do not pick up a nasty cig!

Hang in there - you can do it! Sending a big hug your way,
YQS,
Nancy
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Juanjuanjuanjuanjuan200
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

21 Jul 2002, 22:39 #17

A few months ago I went to the doctor. It turnded out I had not the 20 illnesses my hipocondriac self keeps telling me to suffer. The doctor said you have to stop smoking. And made a worriesome face, in silence. I got exams I never had to do ever in my long, still young, and smokers life. His face, my feelings, my new digestive problem, my conscience told me to seek and accept that cigarette was killing me, and that that thing could happen as johns. As the one described above. Soon, or too early, too soon.

I ve smoked since my 16 years, so ( How should one said?, was a smoker, is an exsmoker, "had been" has a continuity that scares me)...so I smoked for 26 minus 3 years of a quit that I lost. 3 years of a quit and lost it easily, so easily, having to spend 8 years of a ****, of low self esteem, being convinced that I was weak not being able to fight and get rid of an addiction, that I my self had already beaten. I spare to you how the related illnesses and personal disasters that I blame on me, or on me having a problem, have shaped my life on the last 8 years.

I am not presuming of not having problems since I quit, I am saving to my shrink the big ones. I understand that I am here at freedom to quit, to keep this quit. I undestand that relapse is a monster, a devil, a mistake, a life threatening action, a self destroing behaviour. But it could look to me as a party, a joy, a minute of happiness, a success, a wonderful dream because I am an addict. And whatever that scary word means, is sure it will produce on me a total relapse, a full 25 cigarrettes a day season of who knows how many years long. No please. Not for today at least. I will never take another puff. Ni una calada más.


Juan
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

10 Aug 2002, 20:54 #18

Noni, at age 32, and Bryan, at age 33, both
thought that there was plenty of time left too!
Image
Image
Click their photos to read their stories
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

13 Sep 2002, 06:28 #19

Image For Freebird:

Or maybe more importantly for anyone reading Freebird's post and thinks to himself or herself that if he or she relapses, he or she will "simply" quit again. Everyone here must always do everything he or she can do to keep this quit going--there is no guarantee that you have another quit in you. The only guarantee when it comes to quitting smoking is that you will stay free as long as you always stay committed to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

12 Mar 2003, 05:07 #20

Image For CF:

Make sure to read the one right above this one. (Post 50)
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