I have to smoke because of all my stress

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

17 Feb 2003, 20:53 #31

Image In honor or Bill who doesn't really need this and also for anyone else hit by any recent blizzard who may not recognize how things are actually better even when under adverse conditions as long as you stick with your commitment to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

17 Feb 2003, 20:53 #32

Image In honor or Bill who doesn't really need this and also for anyone else hit by any recent blizzard who may not recognize how things are actually better even when under adverse conditions as long as you stick with your commitment to never take another puff!
Joel
Last edited by Joel on 18 Oct 2009, 02:58, edited 1 time in total.
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marty (gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

17 Feb 2003, 21:56 #33

I'll testify to that, Joel Image This past two months have been very stressful for me, coping with a recession in my business, and with a few family health problems. I can honestly say that not resorting to nicotine has enormously helped me retain a clear head, deal immediately with the problems that needed to be dealt with, and keep a positive outlook.
My quit has made every problem seem smaller, every day seem better.
Now my business problems are dealt with, my family are on the mend, and .... and I'm still an ex-smoker Image What could be better than that ?
Last edited by marty (gold) on 18 Oct 2009, 02:57, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

21 Mar 2003, 01:29 #34


Inside the human body your blood serum nicotine reserves are an alkaloid while stress a major acid producing event. Have you ever watched a baking soda/water solution poured onto an acid covered car battery terminal? Even in the body the neutralization is almost that fast. Smoking nicotine does not relieve stress, it only relieves its own absence, while the underlying stressful event must always wait for you to tend to the symptoms of early chemical withdrawal.

Why add chemical withdrawal to every stressful event in life? The rich sense of calmness and comfort that you'll hear Freedom's BSG members talk about isn't only related to long periods of time (days, weeks, months or years) of not THINKING about smoking nicotine but to how much easier it is to handle all the stressful situations that are a natural part of daily life.

It truly is much much harder living and planning life from the inside of pack after pack after pack than it is being "you" again! You're going home to meet the "real" you and I think you're in for a real treat! Just one day at a time, cling tight to your original core motivations, reasons, dreams and desires as they and obedience to the law of addcition are your ticket home!

Breathe deep, hug hard, live long! John
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

11 May 2003, 20:57 #35

Image I saw a newer member who was experiencing triggers initiated by spring storms. I thought this piece explains how winter storms can cause some of the same responses. If an ex-smoker is faced with tornado warnings and is held up at some site where he or she can't smoke, he or she is not going to face nicotine withdrawals induced by the storm. He or she is likely going to face fears and anxieties, but these are normal reactions to the abnormal situation he or she is facing.
A smoker trapped in the same circumstances who is either not allowed to smoke or doesn't have his or her cigarettes with him or her, is going to be facing fear, anxiety and drug withdrawal. He or she may actually feel a compulsion to go out in the storm in order to secure cigarettes. Hopefully logic will set in and the person will realize that as bad as the temporary withdrawal may be, it is not worth putting his or her life on the line in order to go out and smoke for. Although there is no guarantee that an active smoker will think in these terms, considering he or she he or she is putting his or her life on the line every day by smoking in order to avoid nicotine withdrawal.
It still comes down that the only way to really end nicotine withdrawals forever is to stop delivering nicotine and then to never allow it to pass into your body again via any route. This translates to never delivering nicotine via any NRT product, or from chewing tobacco route and to always remember to never got nicotine into your system again via a smoked tobacco route by just knowing to never take another puff!
Joel
Last edited by Joel on 18 Oct 2009, 02:59, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

16 Aug 2003, 22:07 #36

I am not sure that this finding was not reported here at Freedom before being that it was from a published study from last month, but just in case it wasn't I thought this would be an applicable string to address it. So many smokers who have had a history of panic attacks fear that quitting smoking may exacerbate the condition. This study seems to indicate that their smoking may in fact be a factor aggravating the condition.

From the Kansas City Star
August 16, 2003

One more reason to stop smoking - panic attacks
Don't panic -- stop smoking.

A new study suggests that panic attacks are far more likely in nicotine addicts than nonsmokers.

In surveying more than 3,000 Munich-area teenagers and young adults, researchers from Germany and California found that 7.6 percent of regular, nicotine-dependent smokers had a history of panic attacks.

That compares with 0.7 percent of nonsmokers, 2 percent of occasional smokers and 1.9 percent of regular smokers who weren't nicotine-dependent.

The scientists report a similar pattern for subjects who met diagnostic guidelines for panic disorder, a condition marked by recurrent panic attacks, fear about future attacks and worries about their consequences. A history of other psychiatric illnesses couldn't account for the associations, the researchers write this month in Archives of General Psychiatry. Four years later, nonsmokers were less likely than dependent smokers to have developed panic ills.

Here is an abstact of the study being discussed.



From the Archives of General Psychaitry
Vol. 60 No. 7, July 2003


Smoking Increases the Risk of Panic Findings From a Prospective Community Study

Barbara Isensee, PhD; Hans-Ulrich Wittchen, PhD; Murray B. Stein, MD; Michael Höfler, DiplStat; Roselind Lieb, PhD


Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2003;60:692-700.

Background We examined prospectively determined bidirectional associations between smoking and panic and other anxiety disorders and their temporal ordering of onset in a representative community sample of adolescents and young adults.

Methods Baseline and 4-year follow-up data were used from the Early Developmental Stages of Psychopathology Study, a prospective longitudinal study of adolescents and young adults in Munich, Germany. We assessed smoking (occasional and regular), nicotine dependence, panic attacks, panic disorder, other anxiety disorders, and other mental disorders using the Munich-Composite International Diagnostic Interview.

Results At baseline, panic attacks and panic disorder were strongly associated with occasional and regular smoking and nicotine dependence (odds ratio [OR] range, 3.0-28.0). In the prospective analyses, we found increased risk for new onset of panic attacks with prior regular smoking (OR, 2.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-8.4) and nicotine dependence (OR, 3.6; 95% CI, 1.2-10.5). Prior nicotine dependence increased also the risk for onset of panic disorder (OR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.0-10.5), whereas preexisting panic was not associated with subsequent smoking or nicotine dependence. When using Cox regression with time-dependent covariates, prior nicotine dependence was confirmed to be related to subsequent panic attacks (hazard ratio, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.7-4.2), but not panic disorder (hazard ratio, 1.7; 95% CI, 0.7-3.9). Rather, we found indications that prior panic attacks/disorder might also have an effect on secondary development of nicotine dependence.

Conclusions In young adults, prospective analyses revealed a fairly unique and specific, unidirectional relationship between prior smoking and increased risk for subsequent panic attacks/disorder. However, we could not exclude the existence of a second, less frequent, reverse pathway of prior panic and secondary nicotine dependence.

From the Clinical Psychology and Epidemiology Unit, Max-Planck-Institute of Psychiatry, Munich, Germany (Dr Isensee, Wittchen, and Lieb and Mr Höfler); the Department of Psychiatry, University of California-San Diego, La Jolla (Dr Stein); and the Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Technical University of Dresden, Dresden, Germany (Dr Wittchen and Mr Höfler).
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

26 Sep 2003, 07:02 #37

For Jordan. Anxiety and panic attacks are not a valid reason for smoking but may in fact be a valid reason for quitting.

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

28 Oct 2003, 08:46 #38

Image With some of our members from California facing natural disasters at the moment I thought it would be good to bring this one up.
Last edited by Joel on 08 Oct 2009, 00:08, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

24 Dec 2003, 21:28 #39

For people who find holidays particularly stressful.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

22 Sep 2004, 04:42 #40

I saw where the topic of surviving through a hurricane was raised in a post today. The situation basically fits into this post on how a natural disaster of any kind cannot be effectively dealt with or resolved by smoking. If anything, smokers often face special problems during such times either because of access to cigarettes or the challenges of having to go out in inclement conditions in order to smoke or to get cigarettes. The only way to guarantee that your body will never again make demands on you to go out in blizzards, hurricanes, monsoons, heat waves, dangerous freezing conditions or in any other inclement condition in order to feed a need for a nicotine fix is to simply stick to your commitment under all conditions to never take another puff!

Joel
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