I have to smoke because of all my stress

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

17 Feb 2003, 20:53 #31

In honor or Bill who doesn't really need this and also for anyone else hit by any recent blizzard who may not recognize how things are actually better even when under adverse conditions as long as you stick with your commitment to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

17 Feb 2003, 20:53 #32

In honor or Bill who doesn't really need this and also for anyone else hit by any recent blizzard who may not recognize how things are actually better even when under adverse conditions as long as you stick with your commitment to never take another puff!
Joel
Last edited by Joel on 18 Oct 2009, 02:58, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

17 Feb 2003, 21:56 #33

I'll testify to that, Joel This past two months have been very stressful for me, coping with a recession in my business, and with a few family health problems. I can honestly say that not resorting to nicotine has enormously helped me retain a clear head, deal immediately with the problems that needed to be dealt with, and keep a positive outlook.
My quit has made every problem seem smaller, every day seem better.
Now my business problems are dealt with, my family are on the mend, and .... and I'm still an ex-smoker What could be better than that ?
Last edited by marty (gold) on 18 Oct 2009, 02:57, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

21 Mar 2003, 01:29 #34


Inside the human body your blood serum nicotine reserves are an alkaloid while stress a major acid producing event. Have you ever watched a baking soda/water solution poured onto an acid covered car battery terminal? Even in the body the neutralization is almost that fast. Smoking nicotine does not relieve stress, it only relieves its own absence, while the underlying stressful event must always wait for you to tend to the symptoms of early chemical withdrawal.

Why add chemical withdrawal to every stressful event in life? The rich sense of calmness and comfort that you'll hear Freedom's BSG members talk about isn't only related to long periods of time (days, weeks, months or years) of not THINKING about smoking nicotine but to how much easier it is to handle all the stressful situations that are a natural part of daily life.

It truly is much much harder living and planning life from the inside of pack after pack after pack than it is being "you" again! You're going home to meet the "real" you and I think you're in for a real treat! Just one day at a time, cling tight to your original core motivations, reasons, dreams and desires as they and obedience to the law of addcition are your ticket home!

Breathe deep, hug hard, live long! John
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

11 May 2003, 20:57 #35

I saw a newer member who was experiencing triggers initiated by spring storms. I thought this piece explains how winter storms can cause some of the same responses. If an ex-smoker is faced with tornado warnings and is held up at some site where he or she can't smoke, he or she is not going to face nicotine withdrawals induced by the storm. He or she is likely going to face fears and anxieties, but these are normal reactions to the abnormal situation he or she is facing.
A smoker trapped in the same circumstances who is either not allowed to smoke or doesn't have his or her cigarettes with him or her, is going to be facing fear, anxiety and drug withdrawal. He or she may actually feel a compulsion to go out in the storm in order to secure cigarettes. Hopefully logic will set in and the person will realize that as bad as the temporary withdrawal may be, it is not worth putting his or her life on the line in order to go out and smoke for. Although there is no guarantee that an active smoker will think in these terms, considering he or she he or she is putting his or her life on the line every day by smoking in order to avoid nicotine withdrawal.
It still comes down that the only way to really end nicotine withdrawals forever is to stop delivering nicotine and then to never allow it to pass into your body again via any route. This translates to never delivering nicotine via any NRT product, or from chewing tobacco route and to always remember to never got nicotine into your system again via a smoked tobacco route by just knowing to never take another puff!
Joel
Last edited by Joel on 18 Oct 2009, 02:59, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

16 Aug 2003, 22:07 #36

I am not sure that this finding was not reported here at Freedom before being that it was from a published study from last month, but just in case it wasn't I thought this would be an applicable string to address it. So many smokers who have had a history of panic attacks fear that quitting smoking may exacerbate the condition. This study seems to indicate that their smoking may in fact be a factor aggravating the condition.

From the Kansas City Star
August 16, 2003

One more reason to stop smoking - panic attacks
Don't panic -- stop smoking.

A new study suggests that panic attacks are far more likely in nicotine addicts than nonsmokers.

In surveying more than 3,000 Munich-area teenagers and young adults, researchers from Germany and California found that 7.6 percent of regular, nicotine-dependent smokers had a history of panic attacks.

That compares with 0.7 percent of nonsmokers, 2 percent of occasional smokers and 1.9 percent of regular smokers who weren't nicotine-dependent.

The scientists report a similar pattern for subjects who met diagnostic guidelines for panic disorder, a condition marked by recurrent panic attacks, fear about future attacks and worries about their consequences. A history of other psychiatric illnesses couldn't account for the associations, the researchers write this month in Archives of General Psychiatry. Four years later, nonsmokers were less likely than dependent smokers to have developed panic ills.

Here is an abstact of the study being discussed.



From the Archives of General Psychaitry
Vol. 60 No. 7, July 2003


Smoking Increases the Risk of Panic Findings From a Prospective Community Study

Barbara Isensee, PhD; Hans-Ulrich Wittchen, PhD; Murray B. Stein, MD; Michael Höfler, DiplStat; Roselind Lieb, PhD


Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2003;60:692-700.

Background We examined prospectively determined bidirectional associations between smoking and panic and other anxiety disorders and their temporal ordering of onset in a representative community sample of adolescents and young adults.

Methods Baseline and 4-year follow-up data were used from the Early Developmental Stages of Psychopathology Study, a prospective longitudinal study of adolescents and young adults in Munich, Germany. We assessed smoking (occasional and regular), nicotine dependence, panic attacks, panic disorder, other anxiety disorders, and other mental disorders using the Munich-Composite International Diagnostic Interview.

Results At baseline, panic attacks and panic disorder were strongly associated with occasional and regular smoking and nicotine dependence (odds ratio [OR] range, 3.0-28.0). In the prospective analyses, we found increased risk for new onset of panic attacks with prior regular smoking (OR, 2.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-8.4) and nicotine dependence (OR, 3.6; 95% CI, 1.2-10.5). Prior nicotine dependence increased also the risk for onset of panic disorder (OR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.0-10.5), whereas preexisting panic was not associated with subsequent smoking or nicotine dependence. When using Cox regression with time-dependent covariates, prior nicotine dependence was confirmed to be related to subsequent panic attacks (hazard ratio, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.7-4.2), but not panic disorder (hazard ratio, 1.7; 95% CI, 0.7-3.9). Rather, we found indications that prior panic attacks/disorder might also have an effect on secondary development of nicotine dependence.

Conclusions In young adults, prospective analyses revealed a fairly unique and specific, unidirectional relationship between prior smoking and increased risk for subsequent panic attacks/disorder. However, we could not exclude the existence of a second, less frequent, reverse pathway of prior panic and secondary nicotine dependence.

From the Clinical Psychology and Epidemiology Unit, Max-Planck-Institute of Psychiatry, Munich, Germany (Dr Isensee, Wittchen, and Lieb and Mr Höfler); the Department of Psychiatry, University of California-San Diego, La Jolla (Dr Stein); and the Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Technical University of Dresden, Dresden, Germany (Dr Wittchen and Mr Höfler).
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

26 Sep 2003, 07:02 #37

For Jordan. Anxiety and panic attacks are not a valid reason for smoking but may in fact be a valid reason for quitting.

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

28 Oct 2003, 08:46 #38

With some of our members from California facing natural disasters at the moment I thought it would be good to bring this one up.
Last edited by Joel on 08 Oct 2009, 00:08, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

24 Dec 2003, 21:28 #39

For people who find holidays particularly stressful.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

22 Sep 2004, 04:42 #40

I saw where the topic of surviving through a hurricane was raised in a post today. The situation basically fits into this post on how a natural disaster of any kind cannot be effectively dealt with or resolved by smoking. If anything, smokers often face special problems during such times either because of access to cigarettes or the challenges of having to go out in inclement conditions in order to smoke or to get cigarettes. The only way to guarantee that your body will never again make demands on you to go out in blizzards, hurricanes, monsoons, heat waves, dangerous freezing conditions or in any other inclement condition in order to feed a need for a nicotine fix is to simply stick to your commitment under all conditions to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

14 Oct 2004, 01:41 #41

While most smokers actually believe that smoking was an effective stress treatment strategy (a drug that calmed them down), when it really comes down to it, smoking never truly calmed them down. All it did was administered nicotine alleviated nicotine withdrawal that was induced by stress. The illustration and text below covers this point.

The one true step that people are doing here to control their stress is getting rid of a product that should cause any thinking person a lot of worry and to stop the vicious cycle of drug feeding and drug withdrawal by always knowing now to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

17 Aug 2005, 02:07 #42

From the string "If they ever cure lung cancer, I am going back to smoking!"
From: Joel Sent: 8/16/2005 12:59 PM
I am typing in the following paragraph from the current issue of Newsweek:

Talking about Peter Jennings:
On April 5, 2005, he appeared, haggard and hoarse, for the for final time on television and explain what happened. "Yes, I was a smoker until about twenty years ago and I was weak and I smoked over 9/11." It is unclear how much he relapsed in the year since but he was still addicted and known to retreat into the bathroom for a furtive smoke. He began coughing and feeling fatigued last fall, but was not diagnosed until March. His cancer was an operable, though he tried chemotherapy and experimental radiation.
I thought the following strings would be appropriate to attach here in lieu of the phrasing of the highlighted sentence:

Law of addiction
Words that translate to "r e l a p s e"
The relapse of a "social smoker"
Past failures
Closet smokers - a hidden or secret addiction
"Was I addicted?"
We understand why you relapsed
Relapse - the one puff files
Relapse - there is no legitimate reason
 


We will likely never know for sure whether or not Peter Jenning's RELAPSE was responsible for his going on to develop cancer and dying prematurely from the disease. It is relatively clear though from the comments above that his actions on September 11, 2001 resulted in him RELAPSING and that for some unspecified amount of time he continued to fight an active addiction.
Last edited by Joel on 17 Jun 2010, 00:39, edited 2 times in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

07 Jan 2006, 20:50 #43

Why did you really smoke?
Last edited by John (Gold) on 18 Sep 2009, 20:31, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:01

18 Jan 2006, 04:32 #44

For Everyone who's STRESSED today. Especially FoolishWorkinj .

Hang in there!

Anna
1+year
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Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

15 Mar 2006, 12:04 #45

Last edited by Sal GOLD.ffn on 18 Sep 2009, 20:37, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:01

25 Mar 2006, 23:43 #46

Good Saturday everyone!
Just a light bulb moment I wanted to share . In dealing with the daily stresses of life, like we all do, it dawned on me that my smoking just prolonged that feeling of being angry or upset. Especially if I was at home in the evenings, and could retreat to my "smoking parlor" in the garage. This is was my place where I could just stew and waller (sp.?) in all my problems. Then they seemed to magnify and I could really just get madder and madder.
I have a hubby who is quick tempered (and I am so mild mannered....not ), so there are always lots of words being thrown back and forth. I could retreat and smoke and just rewind every bad thing that was said. over and over....... and get madder. You get the picture.
But today, I am thinking that bad things pass a little quicker, I can take them and disect them for what they are, and deal with it, and then let it go. Hopefully then move on to something more productive.
Early in my quit,during a rough day, one of my "quit angels" just bluntly said:
So putting 4000 chemicals in your body is going to help this?
Hope you all have a wonderful nicotene free weekend!
xxoo
aunt valeria
I have been quit for 1 Month, 1 Day, 14 hours, 13 minutes and 17 seconds (29 days). I have saved $81.37 by not smoking 591 cigarettes. I have saved 2 Days, 1 hour and 15 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 2/23/2006 7:30 PM
Last edited by auntvaleria on 08 Oct 2009, 00:10, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

11 Aug 2006, 00:39 #47

Thank you Joel. Earlier in my quit when I faced stress I would want to smoke, but the education I received here made me realize how absurd it would be to do so.
Now, I can face stress and not even remotely think about it. This place truy saves lives.
=Four months, one week, six days, 2 hours, 39 minutes and 4 seconds. 5404 cigarettes not smoked, saving $1,485.76. Life saved: 2 weeks, 4 days, 18 hours, 20 minutes.
Last edited by Jacqui672 Gold on 08 Oct 2009, 00:11, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

27 Sep 2006, 00:41 #48

For Isa, who made it through a flat tire event nicotine free.
From the original post by Joel:
For example, consider a person who finds he has a flat tire in a parking lot during a freezing rain. When encountering this kind of misfortune, the ex-smoker's first reaction often is, "I need a cigarette." What will actually solve this problem is changing the tire, and driving off in a warm car. What would a cigarette do to help this situation? It only makes the person see the flat tire longer and freeze more. This adds up to greater frustration. The first puff will probably reinforce the addiction to cigarettes which is a much greater crisis than the flat tire ever was. In fact, taking the first puff almost always results in a bigger problem than the crisis that "caused" them to take the puff. Even in a real catastrophe, such as a death in the family, injuries, illnesses, flooding resulting in major property loss, bankruptcy and so on, a cigarette will not solve the problem. It will just add another major problem to the originally bad situation.
Remember, smoking cannot solve problems of daily living. No matter what the problem, there is a more effective way of solving it than smoking. In fact, a smoker's health risks are a real problem that can only be solved if they - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on 08 Oct 2009, 00:12, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

03 Oct 2006, 22:59 #49

Why do people smoke?
Education uncovers the keys to break the False Association of stress being relieved by nicotine. Nicotine does not relieve stress, it relieves its own absence. While we were still active users stress depleted our nicotine reserves and led us to the false conclusion that more nicotine (another cigarettes smoked) would reduce our stress.
Nicotine never did anything of the kind.
The stressor (an acidic producing event) was still present and still depleting the alkaloyd chemical nicotine. Nicotine never relieved your stress, it added to it by increasing anxiety levels due to withdrawal pressure.
Break the cycle - Break Free - Permanently!
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on 02 Mar 2009, 21:21, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

15 Jul 2008, 01:08 #50

Related videos:

Video Title Dial Up High Speed MP3 Audio Length Added
"I am climbing the walls because I quit smoking" 2.69mb 8.59mb 3.78mb 08:23 10/18/06
"I'll be a nervous wreck forever if I quit smoking" 3.87mb 11.55mb 4.77mb 10:30 11/29/06
Why do smokers smoke? 2.65mb 5.70mb 8.31mb 18:08 11/07/06
Last edited by Joel on 02 Mar 2009, 21:23, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

01 Oct 2008, 21:05 #51

I saw where a newer member was admiring another member who was quitting while dealing with a rather stressful time period. It worries me when I see comments like this because it makes me think that the person possibly feels that he or she may not be able to quit or stay off when encountering such stresses, or that it takes some extraordinary effort for people to quit or stay off under stressful times. That is not a philosophy that is really accepted here at Freedom. We feel that people can quit and stay off of smoking no matter what other situations they may encounter over their lifetime.

I am going to kick up a few other posts with this comment that all apply to this concept. It is crucial for all who read here to accept the fact that they will be able to stay off smoking under all times as long as they make and stick to a personal commitment to never take another puff.

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

28 Nov 2008, 22:06 #52

From a link in the O'Bob classic string

Success Stories: Before and After (broken link)

I pulled this essential (for me) old post by Joel from March 4 of 2001

Hello Jax:

You wrote the following equation:
crisis=cigarett, stress=cigarett,drink=cigarett etc..etc...


I would say it more like this:

crisis=crisis, stress=stress, drink=drink, etc, etc.


Cigarette=relapse=smoking=loss of control=stench=loss of funds=

loss of prestige=illnesses=disabilities=premature death


All I am trying to clarify here is that a crisis, or stress or a drink, or a wedding or a funeral, or an earthquake or a flood, or a winning lottery ticket, or birth, or a promotion or a loss of a job, or a marriage or a divorce, or a big tax refund or an IRS audit, or great excitement or tremendous boredom, or the oridinary or extraordinary events of life can NOT cause a relapse. Only a cigarette can do that, or actually, just a puff. Life is going to proceed with all its unforeseen variables. But life is going to proceed smoke free for everyone who recognizes that they want to stay smoke free and are going to focus and work on staying smoke free, no matter what. The only thing they need to understand to accomplish that goal is to remember to never take another puff!

Joel
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on 02 Mar 2009, 21:36, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

23 Dec 2008, 22:48 #53

While this string is meant to cover all kind of stresses, the original article referred to cabin fever effects that snow, ice, cold and other forms of inclement conditions that many around the Northern hemisphere seem to be encountering this year. Be careful as to not write off all feelings to simply not smoking. Other factors may very well be at play, from weather, to general holiday stresses, to economical pressures that are truly unique to this year.

As it says in the string "Life goes on without smoking"

It is important for all people who quit smoking to recognize that life goes on without smoking. Over time after a person quits smoking there will be changes: medical, psychological, professional, economic, life roles, relationships, etc. What is important to recognize though is that most of these changes would have occurred whether you had quit smoking or not or even whether or not you ever smoked. As many of my friends are now in their mid-forties and fifties, it is amazing how we share stories of new ailments and new medications being introduced into our lives. Some of these people had quit smoking decades ago, some of them never smoked. None of the ex-smokers bring up a new disorder and say or think to themselves that it must be happening now because they quit smoking ten or twenty years ago. It would be like a person who never smoked who finds out they now have high blood pressure and then thinks to him or herself that it must be because he or she stopped using some product twenty years ago. As we age things happen-it is just the way things go.

If a person gets diagnosed with a smoking related ailment like emphysema or lung cancer years or decades after quitting it is likely that their mind is shifted to think about their past smoking. But medical and psychological conditions that are experienced by smokers and non-smokers alike, the concept of smoking or quitting should not be considered a primary focus anymore.

Smoking did not cause everything. It causes a whole lot of things though and many things that it does not cause, it makes worse. On the same token, quitting does not cause everything. Quitting is usually accompanied with many repairs, but there are also some adjustments (see Medication adjustments) that go on that may need a partnership with your physicians to get worked out.

My general rule of advice is whatever happens the first few days of a quit, whether it is physical or psychological reactions, blame it on not smoking. It is probably the cause of most early quit reactions. If it is a symptom to a condition that could be life threatening, such as severe chest pains or signs or symptoms of a stroke-contact your doctor immediately. While it is probably nothing and just a side effect of quitting, in the long shot that it is something else coincidentally happening the week you are quitting, you need to get it checked out.

Things happening weeks, months, years or decades after your quits though should not ever be assumed to be a quit smoking reaction. It is life going on without smoking. Some of these things may trigger smoking thoughts-especially if they are similar to conditions you did have in the past when you were a smoker. The situation now is a first time experience with a prior feeling where smoking was integrates thus creating smoking thoughts. But even in this case, the condition is creating a smoking thought, it is not that your smoking memories or your smoking past is creating the condition.

Life goes on without smoking. It is likely to go on longer and it is likely that you will be healthier at each and every stage than you would have been if you had continued smoking. Your life will continue to stay better and likely last long longer as long as you always remember to never take another puff!


and

For people who are off for weeks, months, years or decades and who are cranky, nervous, depressed, angry, have sore throats, heart burn, ear aches, backaches, headaches, eye strains, poor vision, hearing problems, broken bones, have stubbed their toes, have financial concerns, job stresses, or any other extraordinary issues going on in their lives at the moment. Don't blame every feeling, bad or good in your life on the fact that you happened to have quit smoking. Life goes on without smoking and as the closing paragraph in this article states:

Life goes on without smoking. It is likely to go on longer and it is likely that you will be healthier at each and every stage than you would have been if you had continued smoking. Your life will continue to stay better and likely last long longer as long as you always remember to never take another puff!
Last edited by Joel on 18 Sep 2009, 21:10, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 17 Jul 2009, 02:28

27 Jul 2009, 01:26 #54

I would have never thought it was possible to have a very stressful moment and NOT want a cigarette. After only 2 1/2 weeks I had a MAJOR stressful time happen and I DID NOT WANT A CIGARETTE! Like Joel said, life is life, it is full of ups and downs no matter if you smoke or not. After I learned what I learned here on this site, and realized you could handle stress better without the withdrawl that went along with it while being a smoker, I felt I could handle anything, and I have so far, and know I can forever no matter what.

This afternoon I was talking to a smoker friend and she has a 10 year old, 5 year old and 1 year old. I said I was at 3 weeks now and she congratulated me. She said there was no way she oculd stop, every time she tried, by the second day she was ready to kill her kids and she gave up. I told her those feelings do not last forever, it gets better and better.........she did not want to listen as MOST don't! Oh well. One day I'm sure she will be asking me questions and I will be ready to answer. It's sad too, she does not have the money for this expensive addiction.
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Joined: 06 Dec 2008, 16:58

18 Sep 2009, 21:12 #55



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