I have to smoke because of all my stress

Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

August 9th, 2001, 12:48 am #11

For Shacky Rose:

The article here discusses cabin fever that may be a partial factor in what you are experiencing now. Not from being snowed in or frozen in your home, but from having your transportation route impaired from a broken down car. Just a possible explaination for some of what you are feeling.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

September 16th, 2001, 7:46 pm #12

This string adds further clarity on how while most people are feeling real stress reactions to the weeks events, smokers in many ways are feeling it worse than they would if they were ex-smokers facing the exact same circumstances. Taking a cigarette does not relieve stress for a never smoker or an ex-smoker. For a never smoker--if inhaled correctly, it will make them sick--like the first cigarette you took when you were a kid. For an ex-smoker--it will cause a relapse to a need for the full compliment of nicotine again. In essence--the ex-ex-smoker is likely in a peak level of withdrawal and feels atrocious from those withdrawals, on top of their original instigating stress reactions. Now if they smoke 10 or 20 cigarettes--they will start to feel "better." Better means that he or she will feel just as rotten as he or she did from the original stress. Then he or she must smoke one cigarette after another at intervals throughout the day that allow him or her to maintain a constant blood nicotine level or face withdrawal again. Basically--the smoker is now in the exact same boat that he or she was in prior to his or her quit. Smoking, stinking, chronic withdrawal, supporting an expensive addiction, socially ostracized, feelings of self-defeat, slowly destroying lung tissue with every drag, constantly depositing carcinogens throughout his or her body, poisoning the bloods oxygen carrying capacity, overworking the heart, basically slowly crippling and killing himself puff by puff. One drag off one cigarette is the key to throwing away your quit and throwing away your health and life. As long as you choose to stay free always remember the key to successfully staying free is to never take another puff!
Joel
Last edited by Joel on October 7th, 2009, 11:13 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

October 11th, 2001, 6:31 pm #13

For MSG:
The nervous energy effects you are experiencing may not just be from not smoking. The events of September 11 have caused a lot of people nervous reactions--people who have never smoked a day of their life as well as people who still chain smoke or people who recently have quit. We are going through extraordinary times and many people are having reactions to world events. As discussed in the other string, there may be other underlying physical issues responsible for stress reactions too. If they don't get better, get checked out, just to play on the safe side. While you may be jittery, it is fully possible you would be as jittery or maybe even more so if you had never quit smoking or went back to smoking, but one way to be sure that you have one less thing to really be nervous about is by always remembering to never take another puff!
Joel
Last edited by Joel on October 7th, 2009, 11:14 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

October 21st, 2001, 10:13 pm #14

I am bringing this one up again since the issues of heightened anxiety has been mentioned by some of our members. Don't automatically assume heightened anxiety is a result to not smoking--other things in life can easily be responsible for such feelings these days. To help minimize your reactions to stress, if not the stress itself, always stay focused on the importance ever knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: January 12th, 2009, 11:23 pm

November 2nd, 2001, 8:10 am #15

Thank you very much :)
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

December 13th, 2001, 7:03 pm #16

This half-life of nicotine levels in the brain is under normal conditions. Under abnormal conditions it may be shorter or longer. Stress makes it shorter--significantly shorter in fact thus increasing the bodies demand for cigarettes. This helps explains why smokers smoke more under stress and why when facing equivalent stresses as an ex-smoker, they will eventually be calmer than when smoking. The first time experiencing a specific stress will be a trigger, but after a time or two the association will be broken and withdrawal will no longer be encountered during the stress. The same stress will then in essence be less stressful for all practical purposes. To never have to deal with stress induced withdrawal, or even withdrawals experienced during non-stress times--just from going too long without smoking--always remember that to end nicotine withdrawal forever simply entails knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

December 13th, 2001, 7:03 pm #17

This half-life of nicotine levels in the brain is 20-30 minutes under normal conditions. Under abnormal conditions it may be shorter or longer. Stress makes it shorter--significantly shorter in fact thus increasing the bodies demand for cigarettes. This helps explain why smokers smoke more under stress and why when facing equivalent stresses as an ex-smoker, they will eventually be calmer than when smoking. The first time experiencing a specific stress will be a trigger, but after a time or two the association will be broken and withdrawal will no longer be encountered during the stress. The same stress will then in essence be less stressful for all practical purposes. To never have to deal with stress induced withdrawal, or even withdrawals experienced during non-stress times--just from going too long without smoking--always remember that to end nicotine withdrawal forever simply entails knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
Last edited by Joel on October 7th, 2009, 11:14 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

January 2nd, 2002, 7:20 am #18

In Chicago it has been a little cold but virtually no snow this year. But I was hearing lots of stories about the huge snowfall in Buffalo New York the past week. I am not sure if we have any members from that area, but I thought it would be good to bring this one up in case we do, and to prepare others from around the country and around the world that may encounter environmental factors that can often trigger such thoughts as smoking from the stress of inclement conditions. Just know, in weeks or months snow will melt and your life will get back to normal. Relapsing in response to such situations does not get automatically fixed when the weather clears. You can find yourself smoking again for many seasons to come, maybe all of them for the rest of your life. To avoid any such risk, just know come rain or come shine, come heat or come cold, come 20 hours of light or all day of darkness (for any Alaskan friends we may have), basically come any climate condition imaginable, they are all surmountable as long as you know to never take another puff!
Joel
Last edited by Joel on October 7th, 2009, 11:14 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:59 pm

March 6th, 2002, 12:28 am #19

Thank you, Joel
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

March 8th, 2002, 5:50 am #20

For Ljoy:
Its good to have an experience like a broken car early on just to prove to yourself that you can get through stressful times without smoking. Normally there is nothing positive to show for such an experience but being that it is proving to you how you can survive such episode smoke free--it makes the event a positive experience as opposed to any kind of tragedy. A broken car is a momentary setback, a lost quit is a life threatening catastrophe.
Last edited by Joel on October 7th, 2009, 11:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

March 22nd, 2002, 12:20 am #21

I did a talk last night where I started alluding to the smoking and stress effects but ran out of time to get into the exact mechanisms involved. I figured on the longshot that any of the participants pop in here I better bring this post up.
In the illustration above you can see on the left how a non-smokers reacts to stress. Without it they are happy and comfortable, when encountering stress they lose this comfort and depending on its severity they can get either mildly annoyed or really upset. The resolution of the stress will normally bring the non-smoker back to the original state of comfort, after a little time of cooling down of course.
Smokers are much more complex. Stress has an affect on all people--it makes the urine acidic. Both smokers and non-smokers experience this phenomena. In non-smoker smokers, the urine acidity has no real visible or perceivable effects--smokers are much more complicated. After the initial stress a smoker will feel like a non-smoker encountering stress, for a few seconds. But then the delineation occurs, the smoker's nicotine level depletes because of the urine acidity induced by the stress, and the smoker is kicked into a drug withdrawal state. The smoker has four ways to deal with the situation now.
First, the smoker can just smoke a cigarette. Well low and behold if the smoker does this he or she will feel "better." He or she will not feel good; he or she just won't be feeling withdrawal for the moment but still be feeling the initial stress. In essence, he or she will feel like a non-smoker under stress, not great, but not in withdrawal either.
The second way a smoker can handle the stress is to solve it and also smoke a cigarette. This results in one happy smoker. No stress now and no withdrawal, life is good at the moment. The feeling of bliss is basically the same feeling a non-smoker has who resolves his or her stress.
But then there are the other two scenarios. The smoker can solve the problem but not smoke. Here is the kicker here, the problem is resolved but the smoker is still in withdrawal, the nicotine level has dropped and problem resolution has no way to stop the nicotine depletion, only a cigarette can do that.
The worst of all situations is the smoker who cannot solve the problem and also cannot smoke a cigarette. This is a miserable situation to ever be in. You normally don't want to be around a smoker in this situation let alone being one yourself. Many smokers find themselves facing this dilemma daily since many jobs and social settings do not allow smoking yet constantly force the smoker to face stresses.
When you quit smoking these last four reactions to stress become a thing of the past. You still face stress, but you no longer have to face drug withdrawals induced by it. In essence you deal with stress in a totally different way when you don't have chronic drug withdrawals exaggerating it.
To stay in the position of being able to handle stresses with greater clarity and minimal discomfort always know that no matter what the stress, to avoid it having any long lasting and life threatening complications always remember to never take another puff!
Joel
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

June 8th, 2002, 6:59 pm #22

In the panel last night we had about 10 panelists. Some shared stories last night, others I know of issues that have happened in their lives since they had quit. One man who was off for just over a year and a half now recalled how his father had died just a few months into his quit and how this was the first major death he had ever experienced in his life and how he still got through it smoke free.

A couple of panelists referred to major scares that happened with their children, one man within months of a quit finding out that his daughter had a brain tumor. Luckily it turned out not to be non-malignant, but for a time he did not know that and yet he was still able to maintain his quit under such stress.

One man had numerous surgeries over the years and had been told by his doctors that the one real thing he had going for him was the fact he had quit smoking so long ago. If he had known at the time that he was quitting that he was going to have to go through such traumatic procedures, it may have interferred with his quitting because the person could think, "how can I get through the stress of such risky surgery without a cigarette?"

It all comes down to the fact that stress is not a reason for smoking, smoking is just a reason for stress. To reduce your causes for stress and likely your reaction to stresses that do occur over a lifetime always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: January 9th, 2009, 12:18 am

June 27th, 2002, 8:52 pm #23

Joel...
You should also post that article titled..."A Safer Way to Smoke"....LOLOLOL!!!!
I am a culprit of the "I will just smoke lower tar and nicotine cigarettes".....
It's like those people who are on diets and order a large pizza with everything on it and then order a large diet coke.....They cancel each other out right? HAHAHA!!!
Now that I don't smoke and I continue to read your articles....I catch myself smack in the middle of them.
I have been the "closet smoker"....I have blamed it on "stress"....I have said "The government wouldn't sell something that was that bad for me" .....such good reading and so much valuable information.....I also think the article..."My Cigarette, My Friend" is great!!!!!!!!!!
I wish everyone I knew would come to Freedom.....


Thanks
KRIS71780
I have been Quit for: 1 Week 1 Day 15 Hours 52 Minutes 42 Seconds. I have NOT smoked 173, for a savings of $25.98. Life Saved: 14 Hours 25 Minutes.
Last edited by kris71780 ( Bronze ) on October 28th, 2009, 12:19 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: December 19th, 2008, 12:00 am

July 12th, 2002, 6:43 am #24

Oh thanks for bringing this one up Joel I was looking for it everywhere.
Good to see it on the boad again.
yqs mirigirl
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

August 15th, 2002, 8:59 pm #25

Tensing up on tobacco road
New Zealand Herald

August 15, 2002

Even light smoking can make people grumpy and less able to handle stress, says a British study.
New Zealand anti-smoking lobby group Action on Smoking and Health (Ash) said the study results, published in the journal Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behaviour, dispelled the myth that smoking had a calming effect.
Researchers from London's King's College subjected two groups to "a battery of cognitive tests that were mildly stressful".
Males and females who smoked between five and 12 cigarettes a day were tested immediately after smoking.
The second group were non-smokers.
The two groups were equivalent in age, intellect, personality measures, and levels of anxiety and depression.
The researchers found the smokers' group was "overall significantly more discontented, troubled, tense, quarrelsome, furious, impatient, hostile, annoyed and disgusted and experienced greater dizziness".
After cognitive tests, "both male and female smokers showed greater increases than non-smokers in feeling spiteful, rebellious, incompetent".
They also exhibited greater sweating, "suggesting that they experienced greater mood changes in response to cognitive stress".
No difference was apparent between the two groups for divided or sustained attention tasks or in episodic memory.
In this month's Ash newsletter, director Trish Fraser said the study was further evidence of myths that tobacco companies used to lure people into smoking.
"We hear a lot about the long-term serious health dangers of tobacco but this study makes the point that tobacco smoking has some immediate effects on mood and ability," she said.
"The tobacco industry has for decades promoted users of their products as calm, confident individualists in control of their own lives.
"However, this marketing image doesn't match up in practice against the sweating, impatient, incompetent person you can become if you smoke even a small amount."
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

October 28th, 2002, 9:22 am #26

"It relieves stress and anxiety"
It is normal and natural to believe that smoking is a stress buster, that it calms us during crisis. How could we not believe it? We felt it happen hundreds or maybe even thousands of times. But as reviewed in the previous chapter, stress relief is one the biggest rationalization shams of all.

According to a once secret 1983 Brown & Williamson research memo, "People smoke to maintain nicotine levels" and "stress robs the body of nicotine, implying a smoker smokes more in times of stress due to withdrawal, not to relax."
1

Stressful events turn body fluids more acidic, which accelerates depletion of blood serum reserves of the alkaloid nicotine. Whether smoked, chewed or dipped, nicotine does not relieve anxiety but only its own absence. Like taking the time to calm ourselves by counting to ten, the time needed for replenishment combines with the arrival of a new supply of nicotine and leaves us falsely yet totally convinced that nicotine was an emotional solution to crisis.

When did using nicotine ever resolve our underlying crisis? If the tire was flat, it was still flat. If some event had made us angry, nicotine replenishment totally ignored the event.

Feeling the physiological effects of stress causes kidney urine acidification. Sucking nicotine from the bloodstream has the effect of making every stressful event life throws our way far more stressful than it is for never-users or ex-users, as they only need to endure the stressful event, not nicotine withdrawal too.

Without replenishment, even if the flat tire or other stressful situation is tackled and resolved, the nicotine addict still is not going to feel good. Conflict resolution does not ease withdrawal. Only re-administration of nicotine or navigating withdrawal and the up to 72 hours needed to eliminate nicotine from the body can bring relief.

Unlike total nicotine elimination, replenishment's relief is temporary. While it calms for the moment, the user will again soon be forced to confront the chemical clock governing their life (nicotine's two-hour chemical half-life) or witness accelerated depletion brought on by encountering stress or by consuming alcohol.
Joel makes one final yet important point. Nicotine's false calming effect quickly becomes a rationalization crutch reached for during stressful situations. The crutch and nicotine's impact upon the user's life is "more far-reaching than just making initial stress effects more severe." According to Joel, "it affects how the person may deal with conflict and sadness in a way that may not be obvious, but is nonetheless serious. In a way, it affects the ability to communicate and maybe even in some way, grow from the experience." 2
Joel shares an example. "Let's say you don't like the way a significant other in your life squeezes toothpaste. If you point out how it's a problem to you in a calm rational manner, maybe the person will change and do it in a way that is not disturbing to you. By communicating your feelings you make a minor annoyance basically disappear. But now let's say you're a smoker who sees the tube of toothpaste, gets a little upset, and is about to say something, again, to address the problem. But wait. Because you are a little annoyed, you lose nicotine, go into withdrawal, and before you are able to deal with the problem, you have to go smoke. You smoke, alleviate the withdrawal and, in fact, you feel better. At the same time, you put a little time between you and the toothpaste situation and on further evaluation, you decide it's not that big of a deal, forget it."
"Sounds like and feels like you resolved the stress. But in fact, you didn't. You suppressed the feeling. It is still there, not resolved, not communicated. Next time it happens again, you again get mad. You go into withdrawal. You have to smoke. You repeat the cycle, again not communicating and not resolving the conflict," writes Joel. "Over and over again, maybe for years this pattern is repeated."
"One day you quit smoking. You may in fact be off for weeks, maybe months. All of a sudden, one day the exact problem presents itself again, that annoying toothpaste. You don't have that automatic withdrawal kicking in and pulling you away from the situation. You see it, nothing else affecting you and you blow up. If the person is within earshot, you may explode."
"When you look back in retrospect, you feel you have blown up inappropriately, the reaction was greatly exaggerated for the situation. You faced it hundreds of times before and nothing like this ever happened. You begin to question what happened to you to turn you into such a horrible or explosive person. Understand what happened," writes Joel. "You are not blowing up at what just happened, you are blowing up for what has been bothering you for years and now, because of the build up of frustration, you are blowing up much more severely than you ever would have if you addressed it early on. It is like pulling a cork out of a shaken carbonated bottle, the more shaken, the worse the explosion."
As Joel explains it, years of nicotine use stopped us from properly dealing with feelings early on. Instead, we allow them to fester and grow to a point where when they do come out, it is far more severe than if initially addressed. Sooner or later, even if we fail to break free from nicotine, that unresolved stress will most probably result in either a blowup or onset of one or more anxiety related diseases.
Don't for a second think that hiding from life by escaping into a central nervous system stimulated dopamine "aaah" sensation or hiding from life is an answer or solution. It's our problem. As we climb back into our mind's driver's seat we need to listen to our feelings and emotions. We may discover that we need to learn to address the root causes of once suppressed anxiety or anger in positive and healthy ways. The only lasting solution to anxieties brought on by rapidly falling nicotine reserves, anxieties that interfere with healthy conflict resolution, is to bring active nicotine dependence to an end.

John (Gold x9)
1 Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation, Internal Correspondence, March 25, 1983, Bates Number: 670508492; http://legacy.library.ucsf.edu/tid/uly04f00

2 Spitzer, J, New Reactions to Anger as an Ex-smoker, an article in Joel's free PDF book Never Take Another Puff, http://whyquit.com/joel
Last edited by John (Gold) on February 15th, 2009, 8:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

November 18th, 2002, 5:03 am #27

This article addresses the issue that often prevents many people from ever seriously considering getting rid of cigarettes--the issue that smokers feel that they need cigarettes to keep them calm. I suspect because of some heavier media exposure than normal over the next week we are going to have a lot of people looking in at us here at Freedom.

I am going to try to keep articles like this that dispel some of the major misconceptions that interfere with people attempting to quit. Maybe some of our members can address this from a more personal perspective. How have your reactions to stress changed since you quit? We know that since we have members who are off from months and years, that many of you have faced major life traumas since quitting.

Are you feeling calmer, more nervous, or the same as when you smoked? Personal insights of a variety of people will likely show a broad range of reactions. So share with others how your stress has changed, or more accurately, how your reactions to stress and mechanisms for dealing with stress have altered. Lets show the world that everyone is fully capable of facing good times as well as bad and still remain smoke free as long people know under all conditions to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: January 10th, 2009, 1:20 am

December 21st, 2002, 7:10 am #28

Yes, thanks - that's the one. And in all the years I smoked, I thought it was because I am unable to handle stress, when in actuality it's the chemical that made me unable to handle stress! That was such a "light-bulb moment" for me.

I had not seen the article called "Tensing up on Tobacco Road." Thanks, that was very interesting and confirms what I've been noticing but couldn't put into words: that smokers are more hostile, temperamental, and volatile. And we're like that because we smoke, not because we don't smoke!
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:58 pm

December 21st, 2002, 8:23 am #29

Thank you Joel for pulling this up. Glad for the "refresher".


Happy Holidays!!
Dos (Dubiously)
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

February 11th, 2003, 9:38 pm #30

I saw where a new member referred to how she was taking a homeopathic product to help with stress since she can no longer smoke. While it is true that when a person first quits smoking he or she may feel additional stresses, there is no real need to take a drug to deal with it. A product you are take for the expressed reason of dealing with a problem should be categorized as a drug, whether it is prescribed, over the counter, natural, or any other term. While the product may not be a drug in other settings, once a person is using it to specifically treat an emotional or physical reaction to anything there is no other term that can more accurately describe it.

The reason I am attaching the above comment in this particular string though is to address the concept of smoking actually being a cause of stress much more so that a treatment for stress. While most smokers actually believe that smoking was an effective stress treatment strategy (a drug that calmed them down), when it really comes down to it, smoking never truly calmed them down. All it did was administered nicotine alleviated nicotine withdrawal that was induced by stress. The illustration and text below covers this point.

The one true step that people are doing here to control their stress is getting rid of a product that should cause any thinking person a lot of worry and to stop the vicious cycle of drug feeding and drug withdrawal by always knowing now to never take another puff!

Joel


In the illustration above you can see on the left how a non-smokers reacts to stress. Without it they are happy and comfortable, when encountering stress they lose this comfort and depending on its severity they can get either mildly annoyed or really upset. The resolution of the stress will normally bring the non-smoker back to the original state of comfort, after a little time of cooling down of course.
Smokers are much more complex. Stress has an affect on all people--it makes the urine acidic. Both smokers and non-smokers experience this phenomena. In non-smoker smokers, the urine acidity has no real visible or perceivable effects--smokers are much more complicated. After the initial stress a smoker will feel like a non-smoker encountering stress, for a few seconds. But then the delineation occurs, the smoker's nicotine level depletes because of the urine acidity induced by the stress, and the smoker is kicked into a drug withdrawal state. The smoker has four ways to deal with the situation now.
First, the smoker can just smoke a cigarette. Well low and behold if the smoker does this he or she will feel "better." He or she will not feel good; he or she just won't be feeling withdrawal for the moment but still be feeling the initial stress. In essence, he or she will feel like a non-smoker under stress, not great, but not in withdrawal either.
The second way a smoker can handle the stress is to solve it and also smoke a cigarette. This results in one happy smoker. No stress now and no withdrawal, life is good at the moment. The feeling of bliss is basically the same feeling a non-smoker has who resolves his or her stress.
But then there are the other two scenarios. The smoker can solve the problem but not smoke. Here is the kicker here, the problem is resolved but the smoker is still in withdrawal, the nicotine level has dropped and problem resolution has no way to stop the nicotine depletion, only a cigarette can do that.
The worst of all situations is the smoker who cannot solve the problem and also cannot smoke a cigarette. This is a miserable situation to ever be in. You normally don't want to be around a smoker in this situation let alone being one yourself. Many smokers find themselves facing this dilemma daily since many jobs and social settings do not allow smoking yet constantly force the smoker to face stresses.
When you quit smoking these last four reactions to stress become a thing of the past. You still face stress, but you no longer have to face drug withdrawals induced by it. In essence you deal with stress in a totally different way when you don't have chronic drug withdrawals exaggerating it.
To stay in the position of being able to handle stresses with greater clarity and minimal discomfort always know that no matter what the stress, to avoid it having any long lasting and life threatening complications always remember to never take another puff!
Joel
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

February 17th, 2003, 8:53 pm #31

In honor or Bill who doesn't really need this and also for anyone else hit by any recent blizzard who may not recognize how things are actually better even when under adverse conditions as long as you stick with your commitment to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

February 17th, 2003, 8:53 pm #32

In honor or Bill who doesn't really need this and also for anyone else hit by any recent blizzard who may not recognize how things are actually better even when under adverse conditions as long as you stick with your commitment to never take another puff!
Joel
Last edited by Joel on October 18th, 2009, 2:58 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:59 pm

February 17th, 2003, 9:56 pm #33

I'll testify to that, Joel This past two months have been very stressful for me, coping with a recession in my business, and with a few family health problems. I can honestly say that not resorting to nicotine has enormously helped me retain a clear head, deal immediately with the problems that needed to be dealt with, and keep a positive outlook.
My quit has made every problem seem smaller, every day seem better.
Now my business problems are dealt with, my family are on the mend, and .... and I'm still an ex-smoker What could be better than that ?
Last edited by marty (gold) on October 18th, 2009, 2:57 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

March 21st, 2003, 1:29 am #34


Inside the human body your blood serum nicotine reserves are an alkaloid while stress a major acid producing event. Have you ever watched a baking soda/water solution poured onto an acid covered car battery terminal? Even in the body the neutralization is almost that fast. Smoking nicotine does not relieve stress, it only relieves its own absence, while the underlying stressful event must always wait for you to tend to the symptoms of early chemical withdrawal.

Why add chemical withdrawal to every stressful event in life? The rich sense of calmness and comfort that you'll hear Freedom's BSG members talk about isn't only related to long periods of time (days, weeks, months or years) of not THINKING about smoking nicotine but to how much easier it is to handle all the stressful situations that are a natural part of daily life.

It truly is much much harder living and planning life from the inside of pack after pack after pack than it is being "you" again! You're going home to meet the "real" you and I think you're in for a real treat! Just one day at a time, cling tight to your original core motivations, reasons, dreams and desires as they and obedience to the law of addcition are your ticket home!

Breathe deep, hug hard, live long! John
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

May 11th, 2003, 8:57 pm #35

I saw a newer member who was experiencing triggers initiated by spring storms. I thought this piece explains how winter storms can cause some of the same responses. If an ex-smoker is faced with tornado warnings and is held up at some site where he or she can't smoke, he or she is not going to face nicotine withdrawals induced by the storm. He or she is likely going to face fears and anxieties, but these are normal reactions to the abnormal situation he or she is facing.
A smoker trapped in the same circumstances who is either not allowed to smoke or doesn't have his or her cigarettes with him or her, is going to be facing fear, anxiety and drug withdrawal. He or she may actually feel a compulsion to go out in the storm in order to secure cigarettes. Hopefully logic will set in and the person will realize that as bad as the temporary withdrawal may be, it is not worth putting his or her life on the line in order to go out and smoke for. Although there is no guarantee that an active smoker will think in these terms, considering he or she he or she is putting his or her life on the line every day by smoking in order to avoid nicotine withdrawal.
It still comes down that the only way to really end nicotine withdrawals forever is to stop delivering nicotine and then to never allow it to pass into your body again via any route. This translates to never delivering nicotine via any NRT product, or from chewing tobacco route and to always remember to never got nicotine into your system again via a smoked tobacco route by just knowing to never take another puff!
Joel
Last edited by Joel on October 18th, 2009, 2:59 am, edited 1 time in total.
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