I have to smoke because of all my stress

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

09 Aug 2001, 00:48 #11

For Shacky Rose:

The article here discusses cabin fever that may be a partial factor in what you are experiencing now. Not from being snowed in or frozen in your home, but from having your transportation route impaired from a broken down car. Just a possible explaination for some of what you are feeling.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

16 Sep 2001, 19:46 #12

Image This string adds further clarity on how while most people are feeling real stress reactions to the weeks events, smokers in many ways are feeling it worse than they would if they were ex-smokers facing the exact same circumstances. Taking a cigarette does not relieve stress for a never smoker or an ex-smoker. For a never smoker--if inhaled correctly, it will make them sick--like the first cigarette you took when you were a kid. For an ex-smoker--it will cause a relapse to a need for the full compliment of nicotine again. In essence--the ex-ex-smoker is likely in a peak level of withdrawal and feels atrocious from those withdrawals, on top of their original instigating stress reactions. Now if they smoke 10 or 20 cigarettes--they will start to feel "better." Better means that he or she will feel just as rotten as he or she did from the original stress. Then he or she must smoke one cigarette after another at intervals throughout the day that allow him or her to maintain a constant blood nicotine level or face withdrawal again. Basically--the smoker is now in the exact same boat that he or she was in prior to his or her quit. Smoking, stinking, chronic withdrawal, supporting an expensive addiction, socially ostracized, feelings of self-defeat, slowly destroying lung tissue with every drag, constantly depositing carcinogens throughout his or her body, poisoning the bloods oxygen carrying capacity, overworking the heart, basically slowly crippling and killing himself puff by puff. One drag off one cigarette is the key to throwing away your quit and throwing away your health and life. As long as you choose to stay free always remember the key to successfully staying free is to never take another puff!
Joel
Last edited by Joel on 07 Oct 2009, 23:13, edited 2 times in total.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

11 Oct 2001, 18:31 #13

For MSG:
The nervous energy effects you are experiencing may not just be from not smoking. The events of September 11 have caused a lot of people nervous reactions--people who have never smoked a day of their life as well as people who still chain smoke or people who recently have quit. We are going through extraordinary times and many people are having reactions to world events. As discussed in the other string, there may be other underlying physical issues responsible for stress reactions too. If they don't get better, get checked out, just to play on the safe side. While you may be jittery, it is fully possible you would be as jittery or maybe even more so if you had never quit smoking or went back to smoking, but one way to be sure that you have one less thing to really be nervous about is by always remembering to never take another puff!
Joel
Last edited by Joel on 07 Oct 2009, 23:14, edited 2 times in total.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

21 Oct 2001, 22:13 #14

I am bringing this one up again since the issues of heightened anxiety has been mentioned by some of our members. Don't automatically assume heightened anxiety is a result to not smoking--other things in life can easily be responsible for such feelings these days. To help minimize your reactions to stress, if not the stress itself, always stay focused on the importance ever knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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HeatherLavendarMist
Joined: 12 Jan 2009, 23:23

02 Nov 2001, 08:10 #15

Thank you very much :)
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

13 Dec 2001, 19:03 #16

Image
This half-life of nicotine levels in the brain is under normal conditions. Under abnormal conditions it may be shorter or longer. Stress makes it shorter--significantly shorter in fact thus increasing the bodies demand for cigarettes. This helps explains why smokers smoke more under stress and why when facing equivalent stresses as an ex-smoker, they will eventually be calmer than when smoking. The first time experiencing a specific stress will be a trigger, but after a time or two the association will be broken and withdrawal will no longer be encountered during the stress. The same stress will then in essence be less stressful for all practical purposes. To never have to deal with stress induced withdrawal, or even withdrawals experienced during non-stress times--just from going too long without smoking--always remember that to end nicotine withdrawal forever simply entails knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

13 Dec 2001, 19:03 #17

Image
This half-life of nicotine levels in the brain is 20-30 minutes under normal conditions. Under abnormal conditions it may be shorter or longer. Stress makes it shorter--significantly shorter in fact thus increasing the bodies demand for cigarettes. This helps explain why smokers smoke more under stress and why when facing equivalent stresses as an ex-smoker, they will eventually be calmer than when smoking. The first time experiencing a specific stress will be a trigger, but after a time or two the association will be broken and withdrawal will no longer be encountered during the stress. The same stress will then in essence be less stressful for all practical purposes. To never have to deal with stress induced withdrawal, or even withdrawals experienced during non-stress times--just from going too long without smoking--always remember that to end nicotine withdrawal forever simply entails knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
Last edited by Joel on 07 Oct 2009, 23:14, edited 2 times in total.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

02 Jan 2002, 07:20 #18

In Chicago it has been a little cold but virtually no snow this year. But I was hearing lots of stories about the huge snowfall in Buffalo New York the past week. I am not sure if we have any members from that area, but I thought it would be good to bring this one up in case we do, and to prepare others from around the country and around the world that may encounter environmental factors that can often trigger such thoughts as smoking from the stress of inclement conditions. Just know, in weeks or months snow will melt and your life will get back to normal. Relapsing in response to such situations does not get automatically fixed when the weather clears. You can find yourself smoking again for many seasons to come, maybe all of them for the rest of your life. To avoid any such risk, just know come rain or come shine, come heat or come cold, come 20 hours of light or all day of darkness (for any Alaskan friends we may have), basically come any climate condition imaginable, they are all surmountable as long as you know to never take another puff!
Joel
Last edited by Joel on 07 Oct 2009, 23:14, edited 2 times in total.
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BillW Gold.ffn
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

06 Mar 2002, 00:28 #19

Thank you, Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

08 Mar 2002, 05:50 #20

Image For Ljoy:
Its good to have an experience like a broken car early on just to prove to yourself that you can get through stressful times without smoking. Normally there is nothing positive to show for such an experience but being that it is proving to you how you can survive such episode smoke free--it makes the event a positive experience as opposed to any kind of tragedy. A broken car is a momentary setback, a lost quit is a life threatening catastrophe.
Last edited by Joel on 07 Oct 2009, 23:25, edited 1 time in total.
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