I hate mimes, but . . .

I hate mimes, but . . .

Joined: January 7th, 2009, 7:32 pm

July 2nd, 2004, 3:53 am #1

In the morning when I wake up is my biggest trigger. Recently, I've been pantomiming a few deep draws on an imaginary cigarette when I wake up. It forces me to take a few deep breaths, and it seems to smooth things out. Though this morning when I did it, I started coughing as if I was smoking.

I wonder if I need to give up pantomime?

durgy - Green+
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

July 2nd, 2004, 4:40 am #2


Deep breaths are fine, Durgy, but to use a healthy morning exercise to pretend that you are again inhaling massive doses of carbon monoxide, 43 carcinogens, and 4,000 other chemicals that include one of earth's most addictive substances, is contrary to the general aims associated with putting an extremely destructive relationship behind you.

Unless your objective is to invite relapse I'd recommend that you begin enjoying those deep breaths for what they truly reflect, some rather amazing healing. Believe it or not a deep relaxing breath can be associated with a small natural release of dopamine. Patience, Durgy, just one day at a time and it won't be long before you'll look back at this post with lots of wonder. Breathe deep, hug hard, live long! John (Gold x5)
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Joined: January 7th, 2009, 8:02 pm

July 2nd, 2004, 4:49 am #4

Hey, Durgy!
Perhaps your first action upon awakening should be giving
thanks to a higher power for another day and,
even better, for another smoke-free day!
Figure a few days of this sort of gratitude would defeat
that waking-up trigger and you can kick it to the curb!
Give it a try...
Naydeen Free for 107 days
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Joined: January 7th, 2009, 7:32 pm

July 2nd, 2004, 4:58 am #5

Understanding the deadly nature of nicotine, I appreciate the thoughtful response.

durgy - who really does hate mimes, and will not become one.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

July 2nd, 2004, 5:04 am #6

As for your morning trigger being your biggest it was for most of us. Nicotine's two-hour chemical half-life inside the human body does not take a break during sleep. If we slept 7-8 hours, picture your body's remaining nicotine reserves being cut by half four different times. By morning our reserves were somewhere down around our ankles and those first few puffs each day were likely some of our most memorable.
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