I Can't Quit or I Won't Quit

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

04 Apr 2001, 06:02 #11

Thanks, Joel. I'm quit for three months now and am trying to be the inspiration for my 30 year old daughter. She's seen me fail several times, and because she emulates so much else of what I've done in my life, she thinks she can keep getting away with smoking for many more years also. She doesn't yet know about her grandmother, I'll tell her tonight. I just pray to God between my mother's cancer and my own firm resolve not to smoke again, that it will help her stop this killing habit before it's too late.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

13 May 2001, 19:43 #12

I am bringing this one up as a special Mothers Day tribute to a person from my past who was a special mother. I know she wanted to save her children, I think she would have been happy to know it helped to save other people's children too, even if its over 20 years later.
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Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 18:59

14 May 2001, 00:17 #13

Powerful story there Joel. Thank you. Yes, the addicted brain sure does try to convince you that you can't quit. It gives alot of reasons even after you have quit! Have to have the right answers to what its saying to you ... and you find them here at Freedom.

sunshineray
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

24 Jul 2001, 17:40 #14

For Notokes:

By quitting smoking you have done the best thing you can do to undo any example you have set for your children. It is not the primary reason anyone should quit, but it is an important secondary benefit. Keep teaching the lesson that life without smoking is possible. The way to prove this for today, tomorrow and basically forever is now for a day at a time continue to show that you are able to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:55

24 Jul 2001, 21:57 #15

Thank you very, very much for sharing "I can't or I won't quit". I know I can only stay quit if I want it for myself, which I very much want, but the love for a child is a very powerful and wonderful thing. I would attack a bear for my child, and not think twice about it, but if only protecting myself, I would run like crazy! There is strength in love, a strength that helps me every day.
Even though I have only completed 2 weeks of not smoking, I am already experiencing the secondary benefits of quitting - my oldest son is already believing he can quit and my husband is beginning day 2 of not smoking!
The support here has made all the difference in my life, and is now touching the lives of those I am closest to. I can never say "Thank you!" enough times. It feels like everyone here has been my guardian angels!
I'll try not to worry too much about my youngest son, but I will be really happy when he gets his results back on the test on his heart. I will try to concentrate on the good things that are happening now, learn from my mistakes, and then put them behind me.

I'm committed and very happy with my choice to never take another puff!
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

15 Aug 2001, 19:07 #16

For Threecrows:

Your sister's concern for your quit while being faced with her current life threatening situation made me think of this one.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

05 Oct 2001, 18:52 #17

My time here is going to be real limited for the next few days. Just wanted to bring up some of my favorite works. The concept in this one is important. I think our members already here understand how this one applies to themselves--but often think that there are others in their life who can't quit smoking. But the same principle applies to these people too, no matter how indoctrinated they may be. Don't think that others you know can't quit. While it may be true that they won't quit, they could have if they had tried and understood what to do. Who knows, one day they may surprise you like you surprised so many others and quit smoking. For you to keep surprising all the others, and, more importantly, to keep surprising yourself, and, more importantly than that, to keep yourself healthier and living longer--always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 20:35

24 Oct 2001, 02:07 #18

What a wonderful story. Thank you Joel.

I wasn't going to impose my quit on anyone in my family i.e. siblings. Because I truly believe quitting has to come from within or it is a recipe to fail.

After reading this story, I had to send it to my mother.

Cheers, Robin
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

02 Feb 2002, 20:34 #19

In memory of Vivian:

I know the diseases and time frame involved were very different--but the message in the epilog of being able to prove to the rest of the world that quitting is possible often has the ripple effect of teaching those around you and often, those most imprtant to you, that they too can quit. Vivian achieved this when Geo quit, and I suspect this was one of her greatest comforts and joys when she proved to him and everyone else she supported that she was able to never take another puff.

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

09 Feb 2002, 19:50 #20

I am attaching a link here to Tessie's First Post. Her parents tried to deliver the same message, as do I suspect many parents when realizing the ultimate price they have paid from smoking. I think all of our members here who have lost loved ones from smoking can use such examples for reinforcing how very important sustaining their own quits can be, and also they should realize that their own quit now may very well be serving as a life saving example for their own family and friends. You can learn valuable lessons from people who died from smoking, and you can also learn a lot from people who saved their own lives by quitting. While you can learn and get valuable insights from either type of person--you would much rather want to be the teacher and the example of the second lesson. To save your own health and likely your own life--show the world and yourself that you are fully capable of implementing your plan to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

14 Mar 2002, 07:37 #21

I thought it seemed appropriate to bring this one up to honor the memory of Diana's father. (See A very sad day, but grateful for my Freedom nonetheless.) I suspect many of us have been touched by such losses. It is nice to know that we are all taking steps here to end this sort of tragic legacy--to pass along the knowledge to your future generations that instead of having to die to quit smoking--you can quit smoking to live--and live healthier, better and longer as long as you always know to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

14 Mar 2002, 12:24 #22

Thank you Joel. ((Joel))

I appreciate what you have done for me more than you will ever know.

I never thought of smoking in any sort of positive light today, only negative. It took my father from me six years ago today, and will quite possibly take my mother from me as well. I'll be damned if it will take me or my future children. It ends with me.

Yqs, Diana
7.5 Months.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

06 Apr 2003, 08:03 #23

Excerpt from above:

"I can't stay, I had a horrible tragedy in my family today, my brother was killed in an accident." Fighting back emotions she continued. "I wasn't even supposed to come tonight, I am supposed to be helping my family making funeral arrangements. But I knew I had to stop by if I was going to continue to not smoke." She had only been off two days now. But not smoking was important to her. The group felt terrible, but were so proud of her, it made what happened in their day seem so trivial.

This part of the story alone deserved its own string. People can quit and stay free even at the worst of times. The best way to keep even the worst of times from being even worse is to always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

23 Apr 2003, 05:34 #24

There was some discussion in another string about whether or not a person can quit smoking because he or she is addicted. Addiction to nicotine explains why a person smokes the way he or she smokes. It does not on the other hand excuse a person from smoking.

When a person says that he or she can't quit because he or she is addicted, he or she is wrong. All addiction means to a smoker is that he or she cannot smoke the way he or she wants to. He or she has to smoke in a way that alleviates withdrawal or suffer from the chronic withdrawal state induced from part-time or limited smoking. The woman in this story is a prime example. W

as she addicted to nicotine for years and decades? You bet she was. Did she somehow become unaddicted* when she was diagnosed with lung cancer? No, she was as addicted as she always was. Was it impossible for her to quit because she was addicted? Of course not, she quit smoking so quitting was possible. So the only question is why did she smoke for so long if she was really always able to quit?

The sad answer to that is that she never realized that she was able to quit until the cancer was diagnosed or she didn't feel that she had a good enough reason to quit until then. Sadly, whichever the reason was, using it ended up with her smoking until it was too late to save her life. Fortunately, it was not too late to save her loved ones lives and I hope her story has helped countless people over the past 25 years to save their lives too from her example.

Addiction causes a person to smoke the way he or she smokes. Understanding the addiction gives a person the tools he or she needs to break free from smoking. For once the addiction is understood for what it is the person has the one piece of ammunition to take permanent control of smoking, which is simply understanding to break free and stay free from smoking is to stop delivering nicotine from any source and then to always remember to never take another puff!

Joel

* Look it up in the dictionary. There is no such word as "unaddicted." This is not by accident. I have a post up somewhere about this but can't lay my hands on it at the moment. Hopefully someone will bring it up or if not I will try to track it down later.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

28 Nov 2003, 22:09 #25

Here is the link to another post that I think people reading here will benefit from seeing: Lung Cancer, Stage 4
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

31 Dec 2003, 09:05 #26

[url=http://whyquit.com/whyquit/A_Noni.html][color=#0000FF][size=160]inoN Noni[/color][/size][/url]

Noni couldn't or she didn't?

Last edited by John (Gold) on 07 Mar 2009, 00:53, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

05 Jan 2004, 15:24 #27

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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

23 Jan 2004, 01:02 #28

We have a few people talking about the influence their smoking has on their children. I hope all of these people read this one to see the influence quitting smoking can have on their children and other loved ones down the road.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

16 Feb 2004, 07:59 #29



We may not think that this story applies to us but being a little bit addicted is like being a little bit pregnant. Like alcoholism our dependency is permanent and each of us only have two considerations: tolerance and how much nicotine it will take in order to die an addict's death or recovery and how much healing our bodies will experience, how rich our comfort becomes, and the number of extra sunrises we'll get to experience.

We cannot quit or we will not quit? Is this really even a challenge when compared to what looms in relapse? There was always only one rule, no nicotine today. The next few minutes are doable. Breathe deep, hug hard, live long! John
Last edited by John (Gold) on 07 Mar 2009, 00:45, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 10 Jan 2009, 00:50

01 Apr 2004, 10:20 #30

I never really thought about how my habit effected by children until I quit. I never smoked around them, never in the car, house, etc. I always smoked outside. My little girl sent me this e-mail a few days after I quit, and it broke my heart, but made me even more determined to succeed.
It sorta gives you an idea how our children feel about our bad choices. This is kid lingo for the computer.....I had to read it a few times....

mom,

hey i wanna tell u that im very proud of wat ur doing u noe smoking!and im glad that ur doing it and i hope u never go back.because i dunnno wat i would do if i lost u to lung cancer. i wouldn't eat sleep play or even go to school i luv u too much to loose u. i've lost too many people just this year. and life has just began for me,and i wouldn't want it to start of loosing u! Ma i luv u and always will for ever no matter how much u get me mad,sad,angery.I still and always will love you for -ever.mom i have never been proud in my life the way i am at u.Mom thank you for doing this! i luv u.
<3always,
your daughter michelle
p.s thanks
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

09 Jun 2004, 19:48 #31

I am attaching an article below that at first doesn't seem to belong in this string. It is talking about how people who switch from smoking to a different form of nicotine delivery can reduce their exposure to certain cancer producing chemicals in tobacco. It showed how the greatest reduction in these specific chemicals were found in the patch users. The article also said that "most of the health risk comes from the carcinogens in tobacco smoke." Actually this may not really be the case. Considering the fact that more people die from circulatory diseases caused by smoking than from cancers caused by smoking I wouldn't say that most of the risk from smoking comes from the carcinogens in cigarettes. But this point is also not the reason for attaching it to this thread here.

The reason I think it belongs in this thread is the closing comment of the article. It says, and I quote, "Therefore, for smokers who are unable or unwilling to give up, the nicotine patch offers the best option for those who want to reduce their risk of smoking-related disease."

If the article had ended on the comment, "for those unwilling to give up," I would have filed it under not particularly important to mention here at Freedom. There are lots of articles that are written all of the time on how people can "reduce" their risks from smoking by switching to alternate forms of nicotine delivery. At Freedom this information is meaningless for we work on the basis of eliminating the risk and problems of nicotine exposure, not worrying about only reducing the risks. But the article said, "for smokers who are unable or unwilling to give up," leaving the impression that there are people who are unable to quit.

My best guess is that there are a whole lot of members here and a whole lot of people who read here who are now ex-smokers who at one time thought that they were unable to give up cigarettes or nicotine. Everyone of them should know now that they were wrong. They were able to "give up smoking," or, more accurately to get rid of smoking. They were able to quit and to eliminate the risks of smoking and the problems of sustaining an active nicotine dependency and they were able to stay off by simpy making and sticking with a personal commitment to never take another puff!

Joel


Comparing reduced exposure tobacco products with nicotine patches

Reported by Susan Aldridge, PhD, medical journalist

A new study compares carcinogen exposure with smokeless tobacco, reduced exposure cigarettes and nicotine patches.
While it's the nicotine in cigarettes that gets people hooked, most of the health risk comes from the carcinogens in tobacco smoke. Some manufacturers are now making products that contain fewer carcinogens like nitrosamine or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

Researchers at the University of Minnesota now report on carcinogen uptake in a group of 54 users of smokeless tobacco, and 51 smokers switching to either reduced exposure cigarettes or nicotine patches. They measured nitrosamines in urine four weeks after making the switch and also levels of a biomarker for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon uptake.

All had reductions in nitrosamines after making the switch and this was greatest for those on the nicotine patch. And only those on the nicotine patch had a reduction in biomarker level for polyaromatic hydrocarbon uptake. Therefore, for smokers who are unable or unwilling to give up, the nicotine patch offers the best option for those who want to reduce their risk of smoking-related disease.

Source
Journal of the National Cancer Institute 2nd June 2004 Volume 96 pages 844-852
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

01 Dec 2004, 04:16 #32

For anyone who may have the impression that maybe it would be better to wait to quit until he or she has a better reason. Yes maybe if you wait you will get a better reason--a reason that is so compelling that you will find yourself "happy" to quit. But that happiness may come at a premium. Quitting smoking at any stage of the game has benefits as seen in this story, but the maximum benefits are gained by people who are quitting when they are still healthy and no one should minimize the importance of that fact. The way to have a healthier life, which will by default be a happier life with all other factors being equal, is to continue to stick to the commitment you made when joining up at Freedom to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

04 Dec 2004, 10:57 #33

Last edited by John (Gold) on 07 Mar 2009, 01:00, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

29 Dec 2004, 20:14 #34

For anyone who may have the impression that maybe it would be better to wait to quit until he or she has a better reason. Yes maybe if you wait you will get a better reason--a reason that is so compelling that you will find yourself "happy" to quit. But that happiness may come at a premium. Quitting smoking at any stage of the game has benefits as seen in this story, but the maximum benefits are gained by people who are quitting when they are still healthy and no one should minimize the importance of that fact. The way to have a healthier life, which will by default be a happier life with all other factors being equal, is to continue to stick to the commitment you made when joining up at Freedom to never take another puff! Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

24 Feb 2005, 21:29 #35

Thanks Joel for bringing this ( I Can't Quit or I Won't Quit) up again. I'd read your article before and it is one of my favorites because of this line which, to me, is very appropros in regards to my son MJ - "they want to stop but they can't. I know where they learned that, and I am mad at myself for it. So I am stopping to show them I was wrong. It wasn't that I couldn't stop smoking- it was that I wouldn't! I know I will not have another cigarette. I don't know if this will make anybody stop, but I had to prove to my children and to myself that I could quit smoking. And if I could quit, they could quit, anybody could quit."
And then I clicked on this link In memory of Rob: I have some sad news (broken link)
I hope Teresa doesn't mind bringing new attention to this message. I had never explored the other links and responses in this string. Because of Rob's (& Teresa's) decision to share their quit experiences maybe other nicotine addicts reading and exploring here at Freedom who may be 'on the fence' with their quit decision will 100% commit to Never Take Another Puff.
My resolve to NTAP! is even moreso - strong and uncompromising. joejFree
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on 07 Mar 2009, 01:22, edited 2 times in total.
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