I Can't Quit or I Won't Quit

DesertRat
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

04 Apr 2001, 06:02 #11

Thanks, Joel. I'm quit for three months now and am trying to be the inspiration for my 30 year old daughter. She's seen me fail several times, and because she emulates so much else of what I've done in my life, she thinks she can keep getting away with smoking for many more years also. She doesn't yet know about her grandmother, I'll tell her tonight. I just pray to God between my mother's cancer and my own firm resolve not to smoke again, that it will help her stop this killing habit before it's too late.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

13 May 2001, 19:43 #12

Image I am bringing this one up as a special Mothers Day tribute to a person from my past who was a special mother. I know she wanted to save her children, I think she would have been happy to know it helped to save other people's children too, even if its over 20 years later.
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SunshineRay
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 18:59

14 May 2001, 00:17 #13

Powerful story there Joel. Thank you. Yes, the addicted brain sure does try to convince you that you can't quit. It gives alot of reasons even after you have quit! Have to have the right answers to what its saying to you ... and you find them here at Freedom.

sunshineray
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

24 Jul 2001, 17:40 #14

For Notokes:

By quitting smoking you have done the best thing you can do to undo any example you have set for your children. It is not the primary reason anyone should quit, but it is an important secondary benefit. Keep teaching the lesson that life without smoking is possible. The way to prove this for today, tomorrow and basically forever is now for a day at a time continue to show that you are able to never take another puff!

Joel
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NPannie
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:55

24 Jul 2001, 21:57 #15

Thank you very, very much for sharing "I can't or I won't quit". I know I can only stay quit if I want it for myself, which I very much want, but the love for a child is a very powerful and wonderful thing. I would attack a bear for my child, and not think twice about it, but if only protecting myself, I would run like crazy! There is strength in love, a strength that helps me every day.
Even though I have only completed 2 weeks of not smoking, I am already experiencing the secondary benefits of quitting - my oldest son is already believing he can quit and my husband is beginning day 2 of not smoking!
The support here has made all the difference in my life, and is now touching the lives of those I am closest to. I can never say "Thank you!" enough times. It feels like everyone here has been my guardian angels!
I'll try not to worry too much about my youngest son, but I will be really happy when he gets his results back on the test on his heart. I will try to concentrate on the good things that are happening now, learn from my mistakes, and then put them behind me.

I'm committed and very happy with my choice to never take another puff!
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

15 Aug 2001, 19:07 #16

For Threecrows:

Your sister's concern for your quit while being faced with her current life threatening situation made me think of this one.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

05 Oct 2001, 18:52 #17

My time here is going to be real limited for the next few days. Just wanted to bring up some of my favorite works. The concept in this one is important. I think our members already here understand how this one applies to themselves--but often think that there are others in their life who can't quit smoking. But the same principle applies to these people too, no matter how indoctrinated they may be. Don't think that others you know can't quit. While it may be true that they won't quit, they could have if they had tried and understood what to do. Who knows, one day they may surprise you like you surprised so many others and quit smoking. For you to keep surprising all the others, and, more importantly, to keep surprising yourself, and, more importantly than that, to keep yourself healthier and living longer--always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Rlg(Robin)
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 20:35

24 Oct 2001, 02:07 #18

ImageWhat a wonderful story. Thank you Joel.

I wasn't going to impose my quit on anyone in my family i.e. siblings. Because I truly believe quitting has to come from within or it is a recipe to fail.

After reading this story, I had to send it to my mother.

Image Cheers, Robin
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

02 Feb 2002, 20:34 #19

In memory of Vivian:

I know the diseases and time frame involved were very different--but the message in the epilog of being able to prove to the rest of the world that quitting is possible often has the ripple effect of teaching those around you and often, those most imprtant to you, that they too can quit. Vivian achieved this when Geo quit, and I suspect this was one of her greatest comforts and joys when she proved to him and everyone else she supported that she was able to never take another puff.

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

09 Feb 2002, 19:50 #20

I am attaching a link here to Tessie's First Post. Her parents tried to deliver the same message, as do I suspect many parents when realizing the ultimate price they have paid from smoking. I think all of our members here who have lost loved ones from smoking can use such examples for reinforcing how very important sustaining their own quits can be, and also they should realize that their own quit now may very well be serving as a life saving example for their own family and friends. You can learn valuable lessons from people who died from smoking, and you can also learn a lot from people who saved their own lives by quitting. While you can learn and get valuable insights from either type of person--you would much rather want to be the teacher and the example of the second lesson. To save your own health and likely your own life--show the world and yourself that you are fully capable of implementing your plan to never take another puff!

Joel
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