I am having difficulty

gbnutt
gbnutt

February 2nd, 2007, 12:33 pm #1

It's been 2 1/2 months and I have made it easily through the typical rough spots (holidays, etc) but the last few days have seemed like one continuous crave. Of course I know it's not, but it seems like one step forward and two steps back. It's even harder because I live with a smoker....please help me!!
Annette
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aimhigh80
aimhigh80

February 2nd, 2007, 12:43 pm #2

Hang in there, please! What's going on? What's the trigger? Go lay down and relax!! Go to a movie!! Go back and look up all your reasons for quitting! I'm on a brand-new second-time quit (The first quit lasted ten years, then I was right back up to a pack+ a day relapse five years ago!!) I just made it through the first week (again!) of this, my last-ever quit!! I am pulling for you.
aimhigh80
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

February 2nd, 2007, 12:53 pm #3

Annette, Sorry to hear you're thinking one would be a good idea. Why would a case of cigs be a good idea? Yeah, not one ... a case! Smoking is an all or none deal. Stay nicotine free and keep gettin those little wide-eyed smiles from your Grandson when he says, Grandma, you smell great!

There will always be others who still use around us. However, just because we are nicotine addicts doesnlt mean we have to live our lives as smelly, sickly tobacco smokers. Need help? reach for your dreams

Being tempted watching others smoke
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katsrule8
katsrule8

February 2nd, 2007, 1:23 pm #4

This little kitty knows that when that trigger is pulled he is 99% dead - However smoking will take a little longer maybe1 to 2 years maybe 30 years maybe never but it is a gamble a long drawn out death, quality of life etc - now I have your attention
Annette you have done so well to come so far, you have read all the info - what keeps me going is that by reading here I have learnt that in 72 hours nicotine is out of my system and a couple of weeks later all chemicals have also made an exit - so what is left is memories (triggers) I get them a few time, but know exactly what they are, something I did when I was smoking - so I tell myself I have not quit smoking I have stopped for awhile - I live with a smoker, and as sick as it sounds, I like the smell, of course I want my hubby to quit, but that is his choice - I have come to terms that I am a smoker, always will be, I was very good at it - However I am a stubborn old cow, and I intend to be in charge of what I do to this old body - and that is to live by the matra NTAP
I believe in you Annette and I know you can do this.

Suzie
129 days and I will make Silver
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kattatonic1 gold4
kattatonic1 gold4

February 2nd, 2007, 1:44 pm #5

Hi Annette,

Congratulations on that beautiful Quit!

Listen, this too shall pass. Good idea to post instead of smoke! Here is some reading that I hope is timely for you today. If you return to smoking, you will continue to get triggers, but they will be many times a day for the rest of your life. If you continue with your Quit, they will continue to diminish. Know that comfort is coming.

Kay (Gold x 3)

Smoking triggers
Some past letters: bad day at 4 months, trigger causes; being honest
Triggers, what are they
Triggers, should I avoid them?
Triggers, breaking links to our crave generator
Triggers - a strange trigger - opportunities for truth
Triggers - reminders from your executive assistant
Why am I still having urges?
Turning the corner - acceptance
The journey home
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musician smokefree
musician smokefree

February 2nd, 2007, 1:56 pm #6

gbnutt,

I bet that the smoker you live with falsely believes that cigarettes are relaxing. But you know better, than to buy into that myth, right? Read up on what's really going on there and why and how nicotine gets users to believe that it is relaxing them. Just one would make you dizzy, cause nausea, feelings of hopelessness and depression. What's worse that all that is you would again be 'hooked'. You've made it this far, hang in there. In recovery of addictions many get 'jittery' as they approach the 90 day mark. It's almost like some sort of internal clock checking to see if this 'change' is actually for real and gonna stick for life... Stay committed, stay focused and above all NTAP !!! You life may depend on it. Please stay with us.

Dale
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lizardl131
lizardl131

February 2nd, 2007, 2:19 pm #7

Hope you can hang in there. I'm new to the group and admire that you've come so far. Without the support I've found here I don't think I could make it. Good luck, I know you'll get through this rough time, you've already shown that you can!!!
Liz, 11 days quit
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chel
chel

February 2nd, 2007, 5:50 pm #8

Have a smile! you can do it!My partner smokes and stinks ! I hated his behaviour for the first couple of months of my quit.Now I realise he is an addict who doesnt want to recover today!Let go of your smoker keep the focus on your self.Read some of my early posts if you like then you can see what I was saying about him.Dont give in I lost a previous quit but I have to own that it was me who reached for the cigarette hoping it would stop my pain. Now that I have been educated about nicotine I know that it daoesnt take away myu pain!xxxxxxx
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VICKIGOLD2006
VICKIGOLD2006

February 2nd, 2007, 9:23 pm #9

Hi Annette and sorry to hear you are having a hard time of it. I can see by the links Kay has sent, you've got all the right material for reading...and that's what we need to do. Sometimes it does feel like two steps backward, but it's those small steps forward that make all the difference. Back to basics. Just NTAP during this moment, then this hour and then just for today, which for you is tomorrow already. Sometimes we need to look deeper to see what we are really the craving...Keep reading Annette. You are coming up on bronze and your ARE doing it one day at a time. Like JoeJ says, it wouldn't be one, it would be a carton, then two and then back into the chains and insanity of full fledged, life risking smoking. After two 1/2 months, I don't think that is what you want is it? Never Take Another Puff was your pledge. Keep it in the now and before you know is Bronze time!!
VICKI - Free and Healing for Five Months, Thirty Days, 15 Hours and 36 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 12 Days and 18 Hours, by avoiding the use of 3673 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $832.70.
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Rickrob53 Gold
Rickrob53 Gold

February 3rd, 2007, 12:43 am #10

Annette, I hope you are reading here this morning and reinforcing your committment to staying quit. Some great links have already been posted above.

I know it can be hard to stay focused when there is a smoker in the house, but your quit isn't about the smoker in your house, or any friends, or any stranger you see who still smokes. Your quit is all about you! No one else is going to suffer the physical diseases and disabilities you will get from smoking. Not your husband, not your grandchild. But they will suffer the agony of seeing you suffer!

From what I've seen here at Freedom, the strong thoughts you are having about smoking at 2 ½ months into your quit is not at all unusual. Some folks get them a little sooner, some get them later (My tough period happened at about 4 months into my quit). If you haven't done so already, I encourage you to open up and read the link in Kay's post above on "Turning the corner, acceptance." This may be where you are at.

Your 20 year addiction of smoking a pack of cigarettes a day adds up to nearly 150,000 cigarettes (close to 1,500,000 million puffs!) that you've asaulted your body and brain with. Each has released the unearned "Ahhhh" of the dopamine rush and recorded with it a high definition memory that basically says "this is survival". With all of this it wouldn't be unexpected to me that you are having thoughts of smoking. For a lot of us, there comes a time in our quits where success is becoming real, and when that happens it can be frightening to us and trigger a whole bunch of junkie thinking again. This is where acceptance comes into play. There is nothing about "survival" that can ever be associated with nicotine! But, a successful quit can be survival itself.

We are drug addicts with a true addiction to the chemical nicotine. What you are experiencing is temporary during this initial part of recovery, and is nothing at all like the true ex-smoker comfort that is down the road waiting for you.

Richard (after 33 years, close to 3 free)
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gbnutt
gbnutt

February 3rd, 2007, 10:35 am #11

Thank goodness you were here for me!!! I spent a few hours today reading the links you gave me and I am feeling MUCH better. Yes, my hubby smokes, but most of the time I just pity him for being hooked, or thinking that sure smells really bad!

You are right...this is my life and it REAL:LY is mine now!
Thanks so much everyone for standing me back up on my feet!
Annette
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