"I'm just too weak to quit smoking!"

"I'm just too weak to quit smoking!"

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

24 Feb 2001, 19:06 #1

Joel's Reinforcement Library
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"I'm just too weak to quit smoking!"


"I can't believe it, I'm just too weak to quit smoking." This statement came to me on the fourth day of a clinic by a participant who could not stop smoking for even one day. When I asked him where he kept getting the cigarettes from, he replied, "They are mine, I never threw them out." When I asked him why he never got rid of them he said that it was because he knew the only way for him to handle not smoking would be by keeping cigarettes around in case he needed one.

This man was not capable of succeeding in his attempt to quit smoking, not because the addiction to nicotine was too powerful, it was his fear of throwing out his cigarettes which rendered his attempt a failure; He figured if he needed them, he would have them. Sure enough, every day he needed one. So he would smoke one. Then another and still another. Five or six a day, never reaching his optimal level and never breaking the withdrawal cycle. He was discouraged, depressed, embarrassed, mad, and, worst of all, smoking.

Quitting smoking needs to be done in steps. First, the smoker should strengthen his resolve as to why he wishes to quit. He should consider the health consequences, the social implications, the fact that he is totally controlled by his cigarettes, the expense and any other personal problems cigarettes have caused him. It is helpful to write down all of these negative aspects of smoking. In the future when he does get the thought for a cigarette, his own reasons for quitting become powerful ammunition for not returning to smoking.

When the decision is made to quit, the smoker should implement a program that has the greatest potential of success. The first and most important step is to quit cold turkey. To accomplish this goal he should dispose of all smoking material. Cigarettes, cigars, pipes, butts, ashtrays, lighters--anything that was considered smoking paraphernalia. If cigarettes are not there, they can not be smoked.

Then the person only needs to live through the first few days, one day at a time. Physical withdrawal may be rough or very mild. The symptoms will be overcome by making it through the first few days without taking a puff. Within three days the physical withdrawal will peak and by two weeks will cease altogether.

But the real obstacle is the psychological dependence to cigarettes. Most smokers are convinced smoking is essential in performing many normal daily activities. Dealing with stress, working, driving, eating, sleeping, waking up, relaxing - just about everything requires smoking. The only way to overcome this perceived dependence is by proving to oneself that all activities done with cigarettes can be done equally well without cigarettes. Just living through the first few days and functioning in normal required roles will prove that the smoker can survive without cigarettes. It may be difficult, but it is possible.

Once the initial quitting process is overcome, the rest is simple. Sure there will still be times when the ex-smoker wants a cigarette. But the ex-smoker must realize that he does not have the option of only one. Because he is a nicotine addict, smoking is now, and always has been an all or nothing proposition. The thought of relapsing back to his old level of smoking with all the associated consequences is all the ammunition needed to - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!






Last edited by Joel on 12 Oct 2012, 13:28, edited 2 times in total.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

20 May 2001, 19:58 #2

We currently have a person participating here who isn't quitting smoking. It is not that she can't, it is that she won't. I don't think she understands the difference yet. But we are not here to witness people self-destructing. We are here to help people stop self-destruction. By allowing a person to come in day after day and never getting off cigarettes is doing nobody any good, least of all the smoker him or herself. For if we just take a wait and see attitude about it, so will the smoker. If we just accept it as an acceptable behavior, so will the smoker. I guess if we really wanted to we could survive witnessing the inevitable failure after failure. But the fact is, the smoker may not have such a luxury. For living is what the smoker is putting on the line with every puff of nicotine he or she ingests.

Anyway, to get the point across that the person needs to stop wasting her time, we are pulling membership. This is not an act we do often here, in fact, I don't think we pulled a membership of anyone since early March. Prior to that we have probably pulled only a handful of memberships that I am unaware of. Out of over 2,000 people members. But everyone here has to realize that we mean business. More important though, everyone here has to realize that they mean business. The business is that everyone here is fighting for his or hers own life.

Hopefully the person will realize that a quit is a 100% commitment, will give that commitment, really quit next time and reapply. But she is only going to fit in here if she quits. Until then she and anyone else who is not ready to quit is welcome to read here and learn here. They will all learn from our members that quitting is possible and that there is life after smoking. Our members all teach each other this. We are not a site of people trying to quit, we are a site of people who have quit. Some for a few hours, some for days, weeks, months or even years. Time without smoking is not the common thread that binds us--success at quitting is.

Do we think that some people just can't quit, that stopping or staying off is just beyond their means? No, we don't mean that at all. Our true belief is that everyone can quit smoking. Everyone! But there are just some people who won't quit smoking. They minimize the importance of each quit. "Oh well, I'll just quit again tomorrow or some day," is their battle cry. Nobody here should ever allow himself or herself to fall into this trap. You just never know which cigarette is going to be the one to start an irreversible process, of either a cell mutation or even sudden death. A relapse with the intent of just quitting again can be a fatal miscalculation. You never know whether or not you will have the strength to quit again, the desire, and worst of all, the opportunity before something big goes wrong--something really big. Your only way to minimize your current and past risks of being a smoker is to always remember to never take another puff!

Joel

Well at least I attempted to quit smoking

I can't quit or I won't quit

I will quit when...

Waiting to bottom out

And for when a person who doesn't make it the first time is ready to quit again:
I tried Freedom once, why bother trying again
Last edited by Joel on 19 Jul 2009, 22:49, edited 3 times in total.
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mirigirl (silver)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

20 May 2001, 20:20 #3

Thanks Joel
Maz
NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!!
Three months, four weeks, one day, 22 hours, 26 minutes and 41 seconds of FREEDOM!!
2998 cigarettes not smoked, saving $959.81. Life saved: 1 week, 3 days, 9 hours, 50 minutes.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

20 May 2001, 22:04 #4

I really did believe the title to this thread for years and years, quit after failed Image quit. I was wrong! I was also very lucky. I could have ended up "dead" wrong. I also thought that to quit successfully took lots and lots of planning, the perfect timing, a period of zero stress, a treasure chest full of quitting aids, 24 hour a day support and encouragement from family and friends, or even for me to be marooned alone on an desert island for an entire month. I was wrong! All it takes is a basic desire that is a willingness to commit for just one hour at a time and one crave at a time. Just 72 hours until the anxiety begins to diminish. Every nicotine addict can remain free for the next hour if they desire to do so. Freedom can encourage and help educate basic desire but it can not create it nor can we make it commit. I wish we could.
Last edited by John (Gold) on 19 Jul 2009, 23:01, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

21 Aug 2001, 20:17 #5

I see this one has not been up for a while. I think most of our members know that this feeling no longer applies to them for they have quit for at least the three days and are starting to realize that there really is life after smoking. But many people come here to read even though they have not yet quit and are still going though this thought process that they are too weak to quit. No one reading this should ever feel to weak to quit--but being that everyone reading here is addicted to nicotine they must realize that they are too weak to smoke just one--or even one puff! It is not even that they are too weak either, it is just that nicotine is too strong. It addicts over 90% of the people who use it, very few other drugs can claim this kind of addictive potential. To break free and stay free from cigarettes always focus on the fact that all you have to do is just for today know to never take another puff!
Joel
Last edited by Joel on 19 Jul 2009, 23:05, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

05 Nov 2001, 22:39 #6

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*Note:
Many of the posts in this thread were written before Freedom changed its policy in November 2002.
Freedom's Relapse Policy
Freedom's relapse policy is simple. Once we understand the Law of Addiction it deprives us of any legitimate excuse for relapse. Any member who relapses shall permanently lose posting privileges.
NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF, DIP, OR CHEW!
Adopted 11/08/02
Freedom's Relapse Policy
Good news, our members don't relapse anymore...
Past FAILURES
Last edited by Joel on 19 Jul 2009, 23:07, edited 1 time in total.
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Joanne Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

13 Dec 2001, 22:02 #7

For our lurkers looking to start their journey to better health. Image
Last edited by Joanne Gold on 19 Jul 2009, 23:08, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

14 Sep 2002, 20:16 #8

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None of us are stronger than nicotine
but then nicotine is just a drug with no
intelligence at all - an I.Q. of zero !!
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Nicotine can not think, plan or prepare.
You can and there is lots and lots to learn!
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You have always been your own magic cure!
It's time to attend quitting school !
It's time for graduation !
Last edited by John (Gold) on 19 Jul 2009, 23:21, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

14 Nov 2002, 11:46 #9

Every successful quit has that magic moment when you've gone as far as you think you can and then you dare take that one extra step. It's then that the brain smiles as the mold is forever broken and the impossible becomes possible. Are the next few minutes doable? You bet they are! Baby steps, just one bump at a time - we're going home!
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

27 Dec 2003, 01:22 #10

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As Roger is fond of saying, "Yes You Can!"
Are you preparing to take back your life but having a few doubts? If so, it's time to stop with such defeatest mind games. As evidence, the below link shares recovery statistics indicating that the percentage of smoking physicians in the U.S. dropped from 53% to just 3% by 1993. Aside from their vocation were any of them physically different or stronger than you? Absolutely not!
For anyone who thinks it is impossible to quit
As long as you have an honest yearning for and dreams of freedom you have everything needed to recover the "real" you. If you add in education, understanding, a recovery philosophy, a few new coping skills, and have a source of serious support, then your odds of remaining free today can dramatically increase.
Never once in the history of the world has mental or physical strength been able to stop nicotine from flowing to the brain once that relapse puff is taken. Strength can no more control nicotine than it can stop a fired bullet that's headed for your brain. The motivational key to overcoming any recovery challenge is in living your dreams and keeping their fuel source robust and thriving, at least until your adjustment to being free arrives at that magic point where you begin to enjoy and appreciate fully engaging life as "you!"
No crave episode is longer than 3 minutes but time distortion during recovery is very real, and the minutes can feel like hours, so be sure and keep a clock handy to keep honest perspective. The next few minutes are entirely doable and there's only one rule - no nicotine!

John
Last edited by John (Gold) on 19 Jul 2009, 23:53, edited 1 time in total.
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