Husband SOS

njbrownii
njbrownii

May 14th, 2005, 9:31 am #1

My husband and I quit smoking together on April 18th. Approximately two weeks after we quit, he started having problems focusing, concentrating, etc. As a result, he is having difficulty doing his job, feels miserable and has told me on numerous occasions that he is going to start smoking again. I know that he really doesn't want to smoke, but is scared that he will never be the same again. I am going to make an appointment with our Doctor, but need some quick advice. I'm afraid he won't make it through the weekend. Has anyone else still had concentration issues four weeks into their quit? If so, how long did it last and is there anything we can try to ease his symptoms?

Nancy
I have been quit for 3 Weeks, 4 Days, 2 hours, 48 minutes and 48 seconds (25 days). I have saved $90.73 by not smoking 426 cigarettes. I have saved 1 Day, 11 hours and 30 minutes of my life.
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ZZRSteve GOLD
ZZRSteve GOLD

May 14th, 2005, 10:06 am #2

Hey Nancy. Congrats on yours and hubby's quits. I see Joel has popped-up some posts which may pertain to this. I'd just like to add that it is a thin line sometimes between helping and giving medical advice, which we should not and can not do. See "Is anyone else experiencing the symptom of...?" . That being said, I was the "poster boy" for being "foggy", for having difficulty concentrating, etc. I couldn't see it at the time but looking back on it now, for me anyway, it was just me still adjusting to trying to deal with life without smoking and maybe still "romantisizing" smoking as well. I think you're very wise with getting a Dr's appointment. I'd tell your husband to hang on to his quit. Read here. Read this: Nicotine Addiction 101 and this:
Some new findings on Nicotine Addiction and thisTurning the Corner... Acceptance. It's not always easy but it's very simple....take it one day at a time and NTAP. It will get better. Just remember that your quit is separate from hubbys'. Good luck. Steve, one year.
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KristinaJayD
KristinaJayD

May 14th, 2005, 10:20 am #3

Hm....he WON'T ever be the same again after successfully quitting smoking.

I don't know who I was, as a smoker...some kind of addicted maniac, always reaching for nicotine. Yuck!

But....there's a big difference between not being "the same" whatever poor excuse that is, and it is, and just plain NOT BEING.

There is NEVER any reason to smoke! NTAP. That's all he needs to know. Have him go to whyquit.com and read about the amputations, etc. A couple of weeks of concentration problems is certainly worth a limb?
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BillW Gold.ffn
BillW Gold.ffn

May 14th, 2005, 11:04 am #4

Hi Nancy....

No, the fuzzy brained, trouble concentrating feeling will not last. Its a withdrawal symptom.

Your husband's boss, or his bosses boss, understands the economics of this. A week or two of less-than-top performance, and then a much longer working career..... OR.... no need to put aside retirement funds for hubby, but plan on spending heavily for medical care. (Did you know that that is the quick and dirty approximation by retirement planners? Smokers don't need to worry about it... )

So: tough it out and live longer, or relapse and cost the company more money in the short run, but they will save on retirement.

Again: that feeling goes away. I am a rocket scientist by profession... and clear thinking is necessary, at least some of the time. That feeling doesn't last.

Good luck to both of you.

BillW Three years, three months, five days. 35717 cigarettes not smoked, saving $7,053.98. Life saved: 17 weeks, 5 days, 25 minutes.
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GoldenDivamom1972
GoldenDivamom1972

May 15th, 2005, 12:37 pm #5

Nancy...

I can totally relate to concentration issues. I quit smoking about a week before my winter semester classes started. I had a *really* hard time getting my class work done for a week or two.

After a slow start, I ended up with B's in both classes. The concentration issues kind of resolved themselves after a time. So will your hubby's if he just keeps up his quit. Yes, it's difficult. Yes, it's aggravating. And yes, it's SO worth it.

The only way out is through sometimes. I suspect this is the case with hubby. Sorry I don't have a solid solution, only understanding and support.

Blessings,
Amy--Bronze+Green
131 days
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forza d animo
forza d animo

May 16th, 2005, 9:58 am #6

Nancy,
Your husband must make up his mind that he has quit smoking. It appears that he is on the fence. Does he understand the choice that he is making? He thinks that cigarettes help him to concentrate. What he does not understand is that he is a nicotine addict seeking a fix and using concentration as an excuse to smoke. If he is willing to be patient, it will get better.

We all tell the newcomers that because it is true. For those of us whose struggle to quit is more difficult than others we must be willing to accept the short term discomfort for the long term benefits which will, without a doubt prove worth the effort to remain nicotine free.

He needs to read more to learn about his addiction. Education is what keeps us all from taking that first puff. Without education we would all find a reason to smoke again. With it, we know that, concentration, is just one of the baits in the trap called addiction. We understand that there is no reason to smoke except to feed our addiction.

Days I just wanted to die

Concentration

Joseph
7 months - 2 days.
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