Lydia Gold
Lydia Gold

11:37 PM - Oct 06, 2002 #76

I wanted to comment on this one, since it was a big issue for me, or at least I thought it was going to be. My spouse is still chain smoking 3 packs a day and unfortunately for me, he isn't at all considerate of my quit. He smokes everywhere, in the tiny bathroom, in the compact car, and all over the house. My requests for him to please not smoke in the bathroom or in the car ( if it's just going to be a short ride) have fallen on totally deaf ears. I have the definate feeling in fact, that he wants me to fail.

I am currently on day 14 of my quit and the smell of a lit cigarette still smells really good, however, the stale smell of it permeating my entire home and car is now sickening to me. Kissing my chain smoking honey is tantamount to licking the inside of an ash tray. But, seeing people smoke bothers me more than smelling it. Even the graphics of cigarettes here on this site have bothered me since I arrived. I almost made a post quoting the 72 hour policy:

"This might be a place where nicotine has no voice, but it sure has it's face plastered all over the place." because the pictures of cigarettes and people inhaling cigarettes really bothered me. I have no choice but to watch it at home but sorta felt like I shouldn't have to here. I was expecting this to be a smoke free zone. I still click away from those pictures pretty fast.

But nothing in regards to all this would ever affect my quit. I have already been tested numerous times. When I was on day 4 of my quit (still bad for me at that point) I was walking my dog when I thought I was seeing a mirage up ahead on the side of the road. I blinked hard and tried to remember if having hallucinations and seeing mirages on the horizon were a possible side affect of withdrawal. As I got closer I marevelled at how real the little oasis was looking. It was a full pack of cigarettes in perfect condition, sitting right there in front of me. I reached out with my foot and gave it a little kick, just to make sure it was real. Sure enough, it was. Thank god it wasn't my brand or the little demon in me might have convinced me that it was an omen that I should be smoking again lol.

The second major test came on day 11. I had to drop Walt off at the dealer to pick up his car. We didn't even get out of the driveway before he had a butt in his mouth. To make matters worse, it was raining out so the window could only be cracked a little. Despite the fact that it was only a 30 minute drive, he refused to comply with my request to wait, and in fact lit 2 more in the next 30 minutes. So I got to pass the anger test as well as the being trapped in close quarters with a smoker test, both in the same day....but it just gets better! I drop him off at the dealer and drive the 30 minutes home, letting go of the anger and indignation that his complete lack of respect had inspired in me, and pull in the driveway, look down to put the car in park and I am suddenly struck by indiscribable horror. There, sitting on the console between the driver's seat and passangers seat is Walt's open pack of cigarettes and his lighter. I am all alone with a full pack of cigarettes and the lighter to set one ablaze and if I do it....no one will ever know. Those thoughts took far longer to write out here than they took to dissapate from my mind. It was just a nanosecond of thought really. I laughed at myself for even having felt something as strong as horror. I saw it as a loaded gun sitting on the console, and that is where the horror came from. But not one second later, I realized that a gun was all it was, it was only dangerous to me if I picked it up and put it to my own head. I decided instead, that it was time to disarm the gun, take the bullets out of the chamber and render it harmless. I picked up the open pack (didn't want to leave it in my own car) and put it right up to my nose. I took a deep sniff of it. I'd like to say that it smelled bad, but it smelled both good and bad at the same time. I walked into the kitchen and threw the pack and lighter on the kitchen table, and that is the end of the story.

Still standing strong in the simple principle that I will never take another puff.

I have been Quit for: 1W 6D 12h 42m 12s. I have NOT smoked 405, for a savings of $111.62. Life Saved: 1D 9h 45m.
Lydia
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

8:50 AM - Nov 12, 2002 #77

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chicjacks (silver)
chicjacks (silver)

1:27 PM - Nov 12, 2002 #78

I had a real test tonight. Had some girls over for dinner. I knew some of them smoked, so I was a little nervous about the evening. They know I quit smoking and the subject came up. I offered to put this website up for them while they were here. They said OH NO we aren't ready to quit yet!!! Anyway, I actually sat outside on the porch with them while they smoked. I thought they looked so stupid with the cig in their mouth. I am proud to say, I didn't want to smoke!!! I still smell smoke. Its amazing how sensitive my smell is now. Smoke stinks and makes my eyes burn. This website rocks!!!! CHICJACKS______DOUBLE GREEN TODAY!!! Can't wait for BRONZE!!!!!
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

8:33 AM - Dec 15, 2002 #79

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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

3:13 AM - Jan 11, 2003 #80

This message has been deleted by the manager or assistant manager.
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

3:14 AM - Jan 11, 2003 #81

There's lots of great member tips early in this thread.
Be sure and use the following controls to read them all.
You'll find them in every thread after the first and last post.
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OBob Gold
OBob Gold

12:10 PM - Jan 15, 2003 #82

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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

1:13 PM - Mar 04, 2003 #83

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OBob Gold
OBob Gold

8:44 AM - Mar 18, 2003 #84

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richard This is It GOLD
richard This is It GOLD

9:37 AM - Mar 18, 2003 #85

I remember last St Patricks day... my quit was 5 days old.... we visited a very very VERY smokey Irish Bar to partake of a Guinness or two.

Can you say CRABBY...I remember it well....


I wouldn't have survived without posts such as these....

I did... you can too....

richard (going into the same bar tonight... it will be just as smokey... the Guinness will taste better... the crabbiness non existant)
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Joanne Gold
Joanne Gold

2:22 PM - Apr 08, 2003 #86

have a friend no internet access
From: scoob Sent: 4/7/2003 11:10 PM
hi joel
this is steve i found those very helpful and informative. have printed them all out and am going to photocopy them tomorrow. have a few friends that would be interested i think. another thing that i have noticed that is starting to bother me is smokers. there are some that are really supportive and wanting to do the same looking for advice. so i inform them as much as i can and tell them to visit whyquit.com. although i am finding people that i have known for years that i have smoked with also smokers are always trying to discourage me telling me that i cant do it. when i already know that i am but they always say ill bet u cant or your putting on weight which i am not. i have a short fuse as it is. just wondering if you have a solution for dealing with narrowminded people like this.

thanks steve

For Scoob!

Hang in there, in time you will care less when others make ignorant comments pertinent to your resolve to stay off smoking. Continue to lead by example, the word "lead" is the key here as you now represent the place where every smoker wants to be. Cigarettes no longer dictate your every move, you make the decisions now!

Most smokers assume quitting is almost impossible and that every ex-smoker never really becomes comfortable. Once we stop looking for the easy way out and that "best quit date" or that big surge of strength, and bag-up all the illogical excuses, we then come face to face with a very powerful addiction. Understanding addiction and patiently surrendering to its recovery process allows us to embark on a very doable journey. The knowledge turns the illogical thought process right side up. It truly is amazing! No more will we take "just one" without knowing that "one" means all of them, our full smoking regiment until it cripples and kills us.

You have made the most important health decision of your life, Scoob, a gift, hold it close. Continue to lead the way! Get good and mad, let your short fuze sizzle all it wants, just remember - aint nothing or no one that can change what you have learned, what you have gained.........in order to stay free and in control from such a deadly addiction, simply, all we have to do is never take another puff. Just for today, no matter what!

Joanne
4years plus free
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Joanne Gold
Joanne Gold

3:19 AM - Apr 15, 2003 #87

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OBob Gold
OBob Gold

6:53 AM - Jun 05, 2003 #88

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Joel
Joel

9:12 PM - Jun 08, 2003 #89

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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

9:43 PM - Jul 27, 2003 #90

Reply
Recommend Delete Message 2 of 91 in Discussion
From: Joel. Sent: 10/5/2000 9:32 AM
Good article John (Zep). I agree whole-heartedly, facing your biggest obstacles makes you realize your ability to face smaller ones. It takes out a major anxiety factor of not smoking. The most important trick is go into these situations being mentally prepared for anything. It will generally turn out much easier and better than you think.

While I always tell people that everything they do as smokers, they can do without smoking, they will often find that there are some things that they no longer choose to do once quitting. Sitting in a smoke filled room is one of them. While it is in their ability to do so, without relapsing I should add, it still can become so uncomfortable, irritating, or in some cases, where somebody has preexisting conditions such as asthma, emphysema or a heart condition, down right dangerous, that no matter what the social factors involved, the ex-smoker realizes it is not worth it.

Sometimes it is not only the smoke which is an annoying factor. Sometimes the environment that you have to be in to smoke is its own challenge. This is seen commonly in the case where the only smoking section is outdoors, and outdoors is currently a subzero climate.

As I said, everything you do as a smoker, you can do as en ex-smoker. But common sense will tell you it is not worth it. While everything you can do as a smoker you can do as an ex-smoker is a true statement, the reverse does not always apply. I could probably come up with a long list of things here that don't work for smokers as they do for ex-smokers, but I am going to leave it at one. Sometimes you can breathe air you so that your heart can pump and you can live another minute as an ex-smoker. Over 400,000 Americans smokers lose that ability everyday.

Thanks for sharing and starting a topic that should be near and dear to everyone's heart. (And lungs, and brain, and a whole bunch of other organs which smoking can slowly destroy).
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Joel
Joel

12:32 AM - Sep 25, 2003 #91

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Joanne Gold
Joanne Gold

1:47 PM - Nov 15, 2003 #92

You will find lots of great member tips early in this thread.
Be sure and use the following controls to read them all.
You'll find them in every thread after the first and last post.
First Previous 67-81 of 81 Next Last
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Joel
Joel

7:07 AM - Nov 22, 2003 #93

Good article John. I agree whole-heartedly, facing your biggest obstacles makes you realize your ability to face smaller ones. It takes out a major anxiety factor of not smoking. The most important trick is go into these situations being mentally prepared for anything. It will generally turn out much easier and better than you think.

While I always tell people that everything they do as smokers, they can do without smoking, they will often find that there are some things that they no longer choose to do once quitting. Sitting in a smoke filled room is one of them. While it is in their ability to do so, without relapsing I should add, it still can become so uncomfortable, irritating, or in some cases, where somebody has preexisting conditions such as asthma, emphysema or a heart condition, down right dangerous, that no matter what the social factors involved, the ex-smoker realizes it is not worth it.

Sometimes it is not only the smoke which is an annoying factor. Sometimes the environment that you have to be in to smoke is its own challenge. This is seen commonly in the case where the only smoking section is outdoors, and outdoors is currently a subzero climate.

As I said, everything you do as a smoker, you can do as en ex-smoker. But common sense will tell you it is not worth it. While everything you can do as a smoker you can do as an ex-smoker is a true statement, the reverse does not always apply. I could probably come up with a long list of things here that don't work for smokers as they do for ex-smokers, but I am going to leave it at one. Sometimes you can breathe air you so that your heart can pump and you can live another minute as an ex-smoker. Over 400,000 Americans smokers lose that ability everyday.

Thanks for sharing and starting a topic that should be near and dear to everyone's heart. (And lungs, and brain, and a whole bunch of other organs which smoking can slowly destroy).
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OBob Gold
OBob Gold

5:44 AM - Jan 09, 2004 #94

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Joel
Joel

11:37 PM - Jan 21, 2004 #95

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Joanne Gold
Joanne Gold

12:56 AM - Jan 28, 2004 #96

For Reimy
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

9:36 PM - Jan 31, 2004 #97


Watch them, study them, it's amazing what you'll learn. In a social setting you can almost see their triggers at work as they tank up early and often. If they've been deprived of nicotine for any length of time watch their expression with that first powerful puff and how long it takes to arrive in the brain (8 seconds). You can almost sense their relief as they waited too long.

Endless compliance with nicotine's two-hour chemical half-life, a host of triggers that include being with other smokers (teen peer pressure having grown old), joy, sadness, boredom, watching anger during story telling quickly generate acids that neutralize reserves of the alkaloid nicotine, alcohol generating acids and doing the same based upon the amount consumed, and all their urges and craves are mandatory or they'll soon find themselves going through withdrawal.

You are watching drug addiction at work, us not so long ago. How many of the smokers you see have any idea whatsoever of why they really smoke, of the law of addiction, or know nicotine's half-life inside their body or how long it would take for their body to be free of nicotine and 90% of its metabolites? How many of them appreciate why those first couple of cigarettes in the morning were always the best (3 to 5 nicotine half-lifes and their nicotine reserves level somewhere down around their socks)? How many of them know the maximum length of time that a subconscious crave episode will last (less than three minutes) or that time distortion is almost universial nicotine dependency recovery symptom?

If you asked them how they'd measure success at quitting, how many of them would pick the biggest bite possible (quitting for life) instead of a manageable and realistic measurement (full and complete success one day at a time)? How many of them have any idea how their brain became addicted or that nicotine's half-life now dictates flow of neurochemicals generating unearned rewards, altering mood or when their body will prepare for fight or flight (adrenaline)?

Nicotine is just a chemical with an I.Q. of zero. It does not plot or conspire even in social settings. Knowledge is power. It's amazing what we can learn by looking at where we've been. Only one rule, no nicotine today, Never Take Another Puff! John

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Joanne Gold
Joanne Gold

9:52 AM - Feb 29, 2004 #98

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Joanne Gold
Joanne Gold

12:07 PM - Jun 20, 2004 #99

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kattatonic1 gold4
kattatonic1 gold4

3:38 AM - Jul 11, 2004 #100

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