"How did we survive back then?"

hmavmom
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:23

04 Dec 2003, 07:01 #21

I live in Barrie, Ontario, Canada and Iam terribly fortunate that I do. Last year they passed a non smoking bylaw that no longer allows citizens to smoke in public places. I have often spent time thinking about what a blessing that is to an ex-smoker to be able to quit and then not have to be continually exposed to cigarettes. In recent years I never smoked in my house or my car because I thought it disgusting but not disgusting enough to quit. I carry with me remorse for all the times I exposed others to a habit so gross I wouldn't even have it in my home. I apologise for people behind me in: lineups, concerts, restaurants and movie theatres. I even had the nerve to be irritated if someone showed opposition. You are right Joel that world has changed and thank god it(we)have.
Last edited by hmavmom on 27 Mar 2009, 11:55, edited 1 time in total.
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Steve012904
Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 23:34

18 Apr 2004, 00:51 #22

Hi all,
I just wanted to post a little on how far things have progressed!!!
I went to a rock concert last night at the Univ of Illinois-Chicago Pavilion and it was SMOKE-FREE. They weren't even letting cigarettes into the building. They searched everyone entering and forced people to either throw-out the smokes or return them to their car....My wife and I discussed how horrified we would have been if we couldn't have smoked for 3 hours...Imagine!!! This was the first concert that I've seen since quiting so I was very pleased to see that it was smoke-free.

Steve

Two months, two weeks, five days, 1590 cigarettes not smoked, saving $393.76.

P.S. It's mind boggling to think I would have consumed 1500+ cigarettes had I continued in slavery!!!
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

24 Apr 2004, 22:02 #23

I suspect most places with cigar bars still allow smoking in them. (See the post Madison, Wisconsin.) But not all of our members have that same luxury of living in areas with such regulations and some of our members are likely still in societies where smoking is still a very accepted norm. But even these people should take heart and know that even when smoking was at its peak in America--people did quit smoking even though they were constantly exposed to the smoke of others. Today many of us enjoy the ability avoid smoke most of the times. Hopefully over the coming years all of us will have this ability. But just know the way that you can minimize your own risk of smoking induced diseases is by you always knowing that to avoid the highest exposure to the thousands of chemical in cigarette smoke is by you knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

24 Nov 2004, 22:03 #24

I saw a post from a member who was faced with travel abroad and the lax nature of smoking regulations in many other countries.

This string serves as a reminder for those of us in countries that have altered such exposure. As we can see here not all of our members have that same luxury, some of our members are still in societies where smoking is a very accepted norm. Even these people should take heart and know that even when smoking was at its peak in America--people did quit smoking even though they were constantly exposed to the smoke of others.

Today many of us enjoy the ability avoid smoke most of the times. Hopefully over the coming years all of us will have this ability. Just know the way that you can minimize your own risk of smoking induced diseases is by you always knowing that to avoid the highest exposure to the thousands of chemical in cigarette smoke is by you knowing to never take another puff!
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

03 Feb 2005, 20:26 #25

This string serves as a reminder for those of us in countries that have altered such exposure. As we can see here not all of our members have that same luxury, some of our members are still in societies where smoking is a very accepted norm. Even these people should take heart and know that even when smoking was at its peak in America--people did quit smoking even though they were constantly exposed to the smoke of others. Today many of us enjoy the ability avoid smoke most of the times. Hopefully over the coming years all of us will have this ability. Just know the way that you can minimize your own risk of smoking induced diseases is by you always knowing that to avoid the highest exposure to the thousands of chemical in cigarette smoke is by you knowing to never take another puff!
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

30 Jun 2005, 04:13 #26

Image This string serves as a reminder for those of us in countries that have altered such exposure. As we can see here not all of our members have that same luxury, some of our members are still in societies where smoking is a very accepted norm. Even these people should take heart and know that even when smoking was at its peak in America--people did quit smoking even though they were constantly exposed to the smoke of others. Today many of us enjoy the ability avoid smoke most of the times. Hopefully over the coming years all of us will have this ability. Just know the way that you can minimize your own risk of smoking induced diseases is by you always knowing that to avoid the highest exposure to the thousands of chemical in cigarette smoke is by you knowing to never take another puff!
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

08 Dec 2005, 19:54 #27

The string Seattle P.I. reccomends WhyQuit.com is a good attachment for this string. First, it illustrates the point of how many areas are making it harder and harder to smoke. But also, as can be seen in the first reply to the string, not all people have the luxury of living in a society where such rules or oven such social pressure to quit yet exists. The good news even for these people is the knowledge that at one time, even places now with the strictest of enforcements used to be safe havens for smokers. Yet people did quit even in those times, eventually reaching a point where so many people became non-smokers that it became the norm not to smoke in most public places. The world is not there yet but city by city, state by state, province by province and in some cases, country by country, being a non-smoker is going to be the expected norm and to exist comfortably in such an area will stay exceptionally easy for all people who have made and stuck with a personal commitment to never take another puff.

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

28 Sep 2006, 21:16 #28

The below picture was just sent to me by a long-term clinic graduate. He was in a clinic I ran back in 1984. He said I would probably appreciate this.

It was titled a:
A Painted Ceiling in a Smoking Room
Image
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JoeJFree Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

28 Oct 2006, 14:23 #29

Message 30 of 68 in Discussion

From: ImageImageMsArmstrongKIS
Sent: 4/11/2003 3:14 PM
I really like this one, because it gave me a good way to think about smokers now that I have quit.

Other times when I have quit, I have played a little mind game where I decide to think smokers are stupid and disgusting and I can't believe I ever did that. But that never felt right to me and now I realize that it's because I didn't have an understanding of why people smoke.

I was having a discussion with my professor for the substance abuse awareness class I am taking for teacher certification. She is a never-smoker. She asked me how I could stand being in a restaurant now, when somebody lights up. She told me how rude she considered it, and that her kids would sometimes go right up to the smoker and say something. She asked me if I supported the new ban on public smoking in New York.

Well, I don't go to bars or restaurants very often (too poor!). I don't love it when somebody across the room lights up. But I know now that they are not doing it to make me angry or to be rude. I never was, when I was a smoker. I just didn't consider it rude, really. I didn't know that the smoke was gross. All I knew was that I really needed to smoke.

When somebody in a restaurant lights up, I'm not sure the proper response is to boo or hiss. Mostly I just feel sorry for the person, because of course they are not trying to be rude--They are feeding an addiction. I've been very pleasantly surprised how much easier dealing with my own cessation from smoking, and the current smoking of others is when you see it as an addiction instead of as a habit.

Now that I understand how much maintening an active addiction was stealing from my life (up to and including my ignorant rudeness towards those surrounding me), I am finding it easier and easier to live with the idea of never smoking again. I still get craves but they are easy to blow off in light of the fact that the alternative is so grim. Conversely, I am finding it easier and easier to deal with current smokers, as well--not as evil, rude people, but as people who are under the power of a force that is stronger than they are.

Alex
1 month 4 weeks
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

29 Apr 2007, 21:20 #30

From above:

This string serves as a reminder for those of us in countries that have altered such exposure. As we can see here not all of our members have that same luxury, some of our members are still in societies where smoking is a very accepted norm. Even these people should take heart and know that even when smoking was at its peak in America--people did quit smoking even though they were constantly exposed to the smoke of others.

Today many of us enjoy the ability avoid smoke most of the times. Hopefully over the coming years all of us will have this ability. Just know the way that you can minimize your own risk of smoking induced diseases is by you always knowing that to avoid the highest exposure to the thousands of chemical in cigarette smoke is by you knowing to never take another puff!

Additonal note here:

Even though some of our members who may live in countries or other places where smoking is unacceptable, they may still belong to social networks where smoking is still popular and even encouraged by other members of their groups. The original article and additional commentaries here address this issue.
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