"How did we survive back then?"

DubiouslyDos
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

20 Jun 2002, 19:57 #11

Like some others, I too remember smoking in the workplace. I particularly liked the optimism (spelling?) of this thread. It is good to know that the world is changing....and that rather that persist in harmful habits to both ourselves and others....by chosing not to smoke, we are changing with it. Our homes, offices and public places are becoming more pleasant and safer places....and by never taking another puff, we're part of the solution, not the problem.

Dos (Dubiously)
X-Smoker, Breathing Easy and More Healthy Every Day I do Not Smoke
3 Weeks, 20 Hours, 55 Minutes
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

05 Oct 2002, 22:58 #12

04 Oct 2002 23:00
British workers want smoke-free workplaces - poll
Image
LONDON, Oct 5 (Reuters) - Despite medical evidence of the dangers of passive smoking, many Britons are exposed to smoking in their workplaces although 85 percent believe they should not be.

A survey by anti-smoking group ASH, Action on Smoking and Health, published on Saturday revealed that 11 percent of employees, which equates to more than three million people, said smoking is still allowed in all areas where they work.

"The population understands that passive smoke kills, yet millions are being put at risk," said Marsha Williams of ASH. "This survey reflects the widespread view that it is simply unacceptable to force people to work in smoky conditions if it can be avoided."

Forty-two percent of the 2,000 people who took part in the survey said smoking rooms were provided where they worked and 40 percent reported a complete ban on smoking in their workplace.

Eighty-five percent said the right to a smoke-free workplace outweighed the right to smoke during working hours, and 62 percent of smokers in the survey agreed in principle with workplace restrictions on smoking.

"Our respondents are sanctioning the fact that government should be putting the right to a safe and healthy working environment before the ill-founded complaints of others about smoking restrictions being an attack on their freedom," Williams added.

ASH wants the issue to be debated in parliament because it believes legislation should be introduced to protect workers.

A review of research into the risks of passive smoking by experts at the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) showed breathing in second-hand smoke increases the risk of lung cancer.

The concentration of harmful chemical and gases inhaled by passive smokers are not as high as in smokers but they are just as dangerous.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

06 Nov 2002, 22:06 #13

Image See Way to go Florida! thread
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

20 Nov 2002, 09:11 #14

For Zengirl:
From: Joel. Sent: 2/23/2002 6:27 AM
This serves as a reminder for those of us in countries that have altered such exposure. But not all of our members have that same luxury, some of our members are still in societies where smoking is a very accepted norm. But even these people should take heart and know that even when smoking was at its peak in America--people did quit smoking even though they were constantly exposed to the smoke of others. Today many of us enjoy the ability avoid smoke most of the times. Hopefully over the coming years all of us will have this ability. But just know the way that you can minimize your own risk of smoking induced diseases is by you always knowing that to avoid the highest exposure to the thousands of chemical in cigarette smoke is by you knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

12 Apr 2003, 02:03 #15

I saw Carlene had the pleasure of sitting next to a smoker at a softball game today. Since I wrote this particular article, I think there is no more smoking allowed in the stands of most professional sporting events in the Chicago area. We are making progress.
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Trew Silver
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 20:14

12 Apr 2003, 02:42 #16

Wonderful article - thank you for bringing this up. Since the title is "How did we survive back then?", I don't think it will be off-topic for me to comment on how many memories came flooding back to me of my childhood.
I remember riding in the backseat of my parent's car, and their smoke (yes, of course, they both smoked) ALWAYS drifted back there with me. I would beg my Mother to crack her window, and she would, just barely, because she didn't want the wind to mess up her "hairdo" (she's the one now with COPD, my father has quit). I remember them dragging me to their parties and having to endure hours of boring adult conversation and gagging on all the smoke. I mean, one of the first things I swallowed when I was a toddler was a cigarette butt which I was promptly forced to vomit.

And no, I had no idea how irritating smoke was until I became an ex-smoker. I wish I could apologize to all the people I made sick who were just trying to enjoy themselves at outdoor events.

Tracy
Two months, three weeks, one day, 22 hours. 1392 cigarettes not smoked.
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casper700kawa
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

12 Apr 2003, 02:57 #17

yup... i remember the same thing mom would only open the window just a crack didn,t want to ruin the bee hive hair .i can remember the burning eyes the stink ect. my mom quit. it killed my dad....yqb..brad..=Two months, four weeks, one day, 1 hour, 50 minutes and 18 seconds. 2642 cigarettes not smoked, saving $528.46. Life saved: 1 week, 2 days, 4 hours, 10 minutes.
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MsArmstrongKIS
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

12 Apr 2003, 03:14 #18

I really like this one, because it gave me a good way to think about smokers now that I have quit.

Other times when I have quit, I have played a little mind game where I decide to think smokers are stupid and disgusting and I can't believe I ever did that. But that never felt right to me and now I realize that it's because I didn't have an understanding of why people smoke.

I was having a discussion with my professor for the substance abuse awareness class I am taking for teacher certification. She is a never-smoker. She asked me how I could stand being in a restaurant now, when somebody lights up. She told me how rude she considered it, and that her kids would sometimes go right up to the smoker and say something. She asked me if I supported the new ban on public smoking in New York.

Well, I don't go to bars or restaurants very often (too poor!). I don't love it when somebody across the room lights up. But I know now that they are not doing it to make me angry or to be rude. I never was, when I was a smoker. I just didn't consider it rude, really. I didn't know that the smoke was gross. All I knew was that I really needed to smoke.

When somebody in a restaurant lights up, I'm not sure the proper response is to boo or hiss. Mostly I just feel sorry for the person, because of course they are not trying to be rude--They are feeding an addiction. I've been very pleasantly surprised how much easier dealing with my own cessation from smoking, and the current smoking of others is when you see it as an addiction instead of as a habit.

Now that I understand how much maintening an active addiction was stealing from my life (up to and including my ignorant rudeness towards those surrounding me), I am finding it easier and easier to live with the idea of never smoking again. I still get craves but they are easy to blow off in light of the fact that the alternative is so grim. Conversely, I am finding it easier and easier to deal with current smokers, as well--not as evil, rude people, but as people who are under the power of a force that is stronger than they are.

Alex
1 month 4 weeks
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

09 May 2003, 20:39 #19

This serves as a reminder for those of us in countries that have altered such exposure. But not all of our members have that same luxury, some of our members are still in societies where smoking is a very accepted norm. But even these people should take heart and know that even when smoking was at its peak in America--people did quit smoking even though they were constantly exposed to the smoke of others. Today many of us enjoy the ability avoid smoke most of the times. Hopefully over the coming years all of us will have this ability. But just know the way that you can minimize your own risk of smoking induced diseases is by you always knowing that to avoid the highest exposure to the thousands of chemical in cigarette smoke is by you knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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DlunyGOLD
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

04 Dec 2003, 03:05 #20

Boy this brings back some memories!

When I was about 6 or 7 years old, my family would go to the local Elks club on Friday nights to play Bingo. Being the late-1960's, the banquet room where the games were held was like a smoke chamber--I imagine it was like being next to one of those "smoking machines" I saw in one of Joel's or John's articles on Whyquit.com.

The smoke would burn our eyes and our clothes stank because of it! My mother was diagnosed with extreme allergies and chronic bronchitis about this time and she stopped atending the bingo nights with us (she has never smoked). When we came home we would have to remove or clothes and hang them up on the front porch to air out before they could be brought in the house the stench was so bad.

Another memory I have is in the early 80's when I was in college. I worked part-time in the back-office of the University library (safely away from the main stacks that any smoking regulations that would have been in place in the "public areas" did not apply in this room) and 2 of the full-time staff members in my work-group smoked. Each one of them (and everyone else on that floor who smoked) had a machine on their desks that was supposed to pull the smoke out of the room. They worked fairly well but not as well as they could have as we still suffered a fair amount of 2nd hand smoke from them.
Then there were 2 different lecture classes I had where the professors smoked RIGHT IN CLASS DURING THEIR LECTURES!!! Talk about setting a poor example for young people! Of course, the effects were not all that bad in these 2-500 seat auditoriums unless you sat down front.

And to think, those were the "good old days!" As the Virginia Slims ads used to say, "You've come a long way baby!"

David - Free and Healing for Twenty Six Days, 5 Hours and 5 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 1 Day and 15 Hours 19 minutes, by avoiding the use of 472 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $35.42.
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