"How did we survive back then?"

DubiouslyDos
DubiouslyDos

June 20th, 2002, 7:57 pm #11

Like some others, I too remember smoking in the workplace. I particularly liked the optimism (spelling?) of this thread. It is good to know that the world is changing....and that rather that persist in harmful habits to both ourselves and others....by chosing not to smoke, we are changing with it. Our homes, offices and public places are becoming more pleasant and safer places....and by never taking another puff, we're part of the solution, not the problem.

Dos (Dubiously)
X-Smoker, Breathing Easy and More Healthy Every Day I do Not Smoke
3 Weeks, 20 Hours, 55 Minutes
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Joel
Joel

October 5th, 2002, 10:58 pm #12

04 Oct 2002 23:00
British workers want smoke-free workplaces - poll
LONDON, Oct 5 (Reuters) - Despite medical evidence of the dangers of passive smoking, many Britons are exposed to smoking in their workplaces although 85 percent believe they should not be.

A survey by anti-smoking group ASH, Action on Smoking and Health, published on Saturday revealed that 11 percent of employees, which equates to more than three million people, said smoking is still allowed in all areas where they work.

"The population understands that passive smoke kills, yet millions are being put at risk," said Marsha Williams of ASH. "This survey reflects the widespread view that it is simply unacceptable to force people to work in smoky conditions if it can be avoided."

Forty-two percent of the 2,000 people who took part in the survey said smoking rooms were provided where they worked and 40 percent reported a complete ban on smoking in their workplace.

Eighty-five percent said the right to a smoke-free workplace outweighed the right to smoke during working hours, and 62 percent of smokers in the survey agreed in principle with workplace restrictions on smoking.

"Our respondents are sanctioning the fact that government should be putting the right to a safe and healthy working environment before the ill-founded complaints of others about smoking restrictions being an attack on their freedom," Williams added.

ASH wants the issue to be debated in parliament because it believes legislation should be introduced to protect workers.

A review of research into the risks of passive smoking by experts at the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) showed breathing in second-hand smoke increases the risk of lung cancer.

The concentration of harmful chemical and gases inhaled by passive smokers are not as high as in smokers but they are just as dangerous.
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Joel
Joel

November 6th, 2002, 10:06 pm #13

See Way to go Florida! thread
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Joel
Joel

November 20th, 2002, 9:11 am #14

For Zengirl:
From: Joel. Sent: 2/23/2002 6:27 AM
This serves as a reminder for those of us in countries that have altered such exposure. But not all of our members have that same luxury, some of our members are still in societies where smoking is a very accepted norm. But even these people should take heart and know that even when smoking was at its peak in America--people did quit smoking even though they were constantly exposed to the smoke of others. Today many of us enjoy the ability avoid smoke most of the times. Hopefully over the coming years all of us will have this ability. But just know the way that you can minimize your own risk of smoking induced diseases is by you always knowing that to avoid the highest exposure to the thousands of chemical in cigarette smoke is by you knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joel

April 12th, 2003, 2:03 am #15

I saw Carlene had the pleasure of sitting next to a smoker at a softball game today. Since I wrote this particular article, I think there is no more smoking allowed in the stands of most professional sporting events in the Chicago area. We are making progress.
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Trew Silver
Trew Silver

April 12th, 2003, 2:42 am #16

Wonderful article - thank you for bringing this up. Since the title is "How did we survive back then?", I don't think it will be off-topic for me to comment on how many memories came flooding back to me of my childhood.
I remember riding in the backseat of my parent's car, and their smoke (yes, of course, they both smoked) ALWAYS drifted back there with me. I would beg my Mother to crack her window, and she would, just barely, because she didn't want the wind to mess up her "hairdo" (she's the one now with COPD, my father has quit). I remember them dragging me to their parties and having to endure hours of boring adult conversation and gagging on all the smoke. I mean, one of the first things I swallowed when I was a toddler was a cigarette butt which I was promptly forced to vomit.

And no, I had no idea how irritating smoke was until I became an ex-smoker. I wish I could apologize to all the people I made sick who were just trying to enjoy themselves at outdoor events.

Tracy
Two months, three weeks, one day, 22 hours. 1392 cigarettes not smoked.
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casper700kawa
casper700kawa

April 12th, 2003, 2:57 am #17

yup... i remember the same thing mom would only open the window just a crack didn,t want to ruin the bee hive hair .i can remember the burning eyes the stink ect. my mom quit. it killed my dad....yqb..brad..=Two months, four weeks, one day, 1 hour, 50 minutes and 18 seconds. 2642 cigarettes not smoked, saving $528.46. Life saved: 1 week, 2 days, 4 hours, 10 minutes.
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MsArmstrongKIS
MsArmstrongKIS

April 12th, 2003, 3:14 am #18

I really like this one, because it gave me a good way to think about smokers now that I have quit.

Other times when I have quit, I have played a little mind game where I decide to think smokers are stupid and disgusting and I can't believe I ever did that. But that never felt right to me and now I realize that it's because I didn't have an understanding of why people smoke.

I was having a discussion with my professor for the substance abuse awareness class I am taking for teacher certification. She is a never-smoker. She asked me how I could stand being in a restaurant now, when somebody lights up. She told me how rude she considered it, and that her kids would sometimes go right up to the smoker and say something. She asked me if I supported the new ban on public smoking in New York.

Well, I don't go to bars or restaurants very often (too poor!). I don't love it when somebody across the room lights up. But I know now that they are not doing it to make me angry or to be rude. I never was, when I was a smoker. I just didn't consider it rude, really. I didn't know that the smoke was gross. All I knew was that I really needed to smoke.

When somebody in a restaurant lights up, I'm not sure the proper response is to boo or hiss. Mostly I just feel sorry for the person, because of course they are not trying to be rude--They are feeding an addiction. I've been very pleasantly surprised how much easier dealing with my own cessation from smoking, and the current smoking of others is when you see it as an addiction instead of as a habit.

Now that I understand how much maintening an active addiction was stealing from my life (up to and including my ignorant rudeness towards those surrounding me), I am finding it easier and easier to live with the idea of never smoking again. I still get craves but they are easy to blow off in light of the fact that the alternative is so grim. Conversely, I am finding it easier and easier to deal with current smokers, as well--not as evil, rude people, but as people who are under the power of a force that is stronger than they are.

Alex
1 month 4 weeks
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Joel
Joel

May 9th, 2003, 8:39 pm #19

This serves as a reminder for those of us in countries that have altered such exposure. But not all of our members have that same luxury, some of our members are still in societies where smoking is a very accepted norm. But even these people should take heart and know that even when smoking was at its peak in America--people did quit smoking even though they were constantly exposed to the smoke of others. Today many of us enjoy the ability avoid smoke most of the times. Hopefully over the coming years all of us will have this ability. But just know the way that you can minimize your own risk of smoking induced diseases is by you always knowing that to avoid the highest exposure to the thousands of chemical in cigarette smoke is by you knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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DlunyGOLD
DlunyGOLD

December 4th, 2003, 3:05 am #20

Boy this brings back some memories!

When I was about 6 or 7 years old, my family would go to the local Elks club on Friday nights to play Bingo. Being the late-1960's, the banquet room where the games were held was like a smoke chamber--I imagine it was like being next to one of those "smoking machines" I saw in one of Joel's or John's articles on Whyquit.com.

The smoke would burn our eyes and our clothes stank because of it! My mother was diagnosed with extreme allergies and chronic bronchitis about this time and she stopped atending the bingo nights with us (she has never smoked). When we came home we would have to remove or clothes and hang them up on the front porch to air out before they could be brought in the house the stench was so bad.

Another memory I have is in the early 80's when I was in college. I worked part-time in the back-office of the University library (safely away from the main stacks that any smoking regulations that would have been in place in the "public areas" did not apply in this room) and 2 of the full-time staff members in my work-group smoked. Each one of them (and everyone else on that floor who smoked) had a machine on their desks that was supposed to pull the smoke out of the room. They worked fairly well but not as well as they could have as we still suffered a fair amount of 2nd hand smoke from them.
Then there were 2 different lecture classes I had where the professors smoked RIGHT IN CLASS DURING THEIR LECTURES!!! Talk about setting a poor example for young people! Of course, the effects were not all that bad in these 2-500 seat auditoriums unless you sat down front.

And to think, those were the "good old days!" As the Virginia Slims ads used to say, "You've come a long way baby!"

David - Free and Healing for Twenty Six Days, 5 Hours and 5 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 1 Day and 15 Hours 19 minutes, by avoiding the use of 472 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $35.42.
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hmavmom
hmavmom

December 4th, 2003, 7:01 am #21

I live in Barrie, Ontario, Canada and Iam terribly fortunate that I do. Last year they passed a non smoking bylaw that no longer allows citizens to smoke in public places. I have often spent time thinking about what a blessing that is to an ex-smoker to be able to quit and then not have to be continually exposed to cigarettes. In recent years I never smoked in my house or my car because I thought it disgusting but not disgusting enough to quit. I carry with me remorse for all the times I exposed others to a habit so gross I wouldn't even have it in my home. I apologise for people behind me in: lineups, concerts, restaurants and movie theatres. I even had the nerve to be irritated if someone showed opposition. You are right Joel that world has changed and thank god it(we)have.
Last edited by hmavmom on March 27th, 2009, 11:55 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Steve012904
Steve012904

April 18th, 2004, 12:51 am #22

Hi all,
I just wanted to post a little on how far things have progressed!!!
I went to a rock concert last night at the Univ of Illinois-Chicago Pavilion and it was SMOKE-FREE. They weren't even letting cigarettes into the building. They searched everyone entering and forced people to either throw-out the smokes or return them to their car....My wife and I discussed how horrified we would have been if we couldn't have smoked for 3 hours...Imagine!!! This was the first concert that I've seen since quiting so I was very pleased to see that it was smoke-free.

Steve

Two months, two weeks, five days, 1590 cigarettes not smoked, saving $393.76.

P.S. It's mind boggling to think I would have consumed 1500+ cigarettes had I continued in slavery!!!
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Joel
Joel

April 24th, 2004, 10:02 pm #23

I suspect most places with cigar bars still allow smoking in them. (See the post Madison, Wisconsin.) But not all of our members have that same luxury of living in areas with such regulations and some of our members are likely still in societies where smoking is still a very accepted norm. But even these people should take heart and know that even when smoking was at its peak in America--people did quit smoking even though they were constantly exposed to the smoke of others. Today many of us enjoy the ability avoid smoke most of the times. Hopefully over the coming years all of us will have this ability. But just know the way that you can minimize your own risk of smoking induced diseases is by you always knowing that to avoid the highest exposure to the thousands of chemical in cigarette smoke is by you knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joel

November 24th, 2004, 10:03 pm #24

I saw a post from a member who was faced with travel abroad and the lax nature of smoking regulations in many other countries.

This string serves as a reminder for those of us in countries that have altered such exposure. As we can see here not all of our members have that same luxury, some of our members are still in societies where smoking is a very accepted norm. Even these people should take heart and know that even when smoking was at its peak in America--people did quit smoking even though they were constantly exposed to the smoke of others.

Today many of us enjoy the ability avoid smoke most of the times. Hopefully over the coming years all of us will have this ability. Just know the way that you can minimize your own risk of smoking induced diseases is by you always knowing that to avoid the highest exposure to the thousands of chemical in cigarette smoke is by you knowing to never take another puff!
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Joel
Joel

February 3rd, 2005, 8:26 pm #25

This string serves as a reminder for those of us in countries that have altered such exposure. As we can see here not all of our members have that same luxury, some of our members are still in societies where smoking is a very accepted norm. Even these people should take heart and know that even when smoking was at its peak in America--people did quit smoking even though they were constantly exposed to the smoke of others. Today many of us enjoy the ability avoid smoke most of the times. Hopefully over the coming years all of us will have this ability. Just know the way that you can minimize your own risk of smoking induced diseases is by you always knowing that to avoid the highest exposure to the thousands of chemical in cigarette smoke is by you knowing to never take another puff!
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Joel
Joel

June 30th, 2005, 4:13 am #26

This string serves as a reminder for those of us in countries that have altered such exposure. As we can see here not all of our members have that same luxury, some of our members are still in societies where smoking is a very accepted norm. Even these people should take heart and know that even when smoking was at its peak in America--people did quit smoking even though they were constantly exposed to the smoke of others. Today many of us enjoy the ability avoid smoke most of the times. Hopefully over the coming years all of us will have this ability. Just know the way that you can minimize your own risk of smoking induced diseases is by you always knowing that to avoid the highest exposure to the thousands of chemical in cigarette smoke is by you knowing to never take another puff!
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Joel
Joel

December 8th, 2005, 7:54 pm #27

The string Seattle P.I. reccomends WhyQuit.com is a good attachment for this string. First, it illustrates the point of how many areas are making it harder and harder to smoke. But also, as can be seen in the first reply to the string, not all people have the luxury of living in a society where such rules or oven such social pressure to quit yet exists. The good news even for these people is the knowledge that at one time, even places now with the strictest of enforcements used to be safe havens for smokers. Yet people did quit even in those times, eventually reaching a point where so many people became non-smokers that it became the norm not to smoke in most public places. The world is not there yet but city by city, state by state, province by province and in some cases, country by country, being a non-smoker is going to be the expected norm and to exist comfortably in such an area will stay exceptionally easy for all people who have made and stuck with a personal commitment to never take another puff.

Joel
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Joel
Joel

September 28th, 2006, 9:16 pm #28

The below picture was just sent to me by a long-term clinic graduate. He was in a clinic I ran back in 1984. He said I would probably appreciate this.

It was titled a:
A Painted Ceiling in a Smoking Room
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

October 28th, 2006, 2:23 pm #29

Message 30 of 68 in Discussion

From: MsArmstrongKIS
Sent: 4/11/2003 3:14 PM
I really like this one, because it gave me a good way to think about smokers now that I have quit.

Other times when I have quit, I have played a little mind game where I decide to think smokers are stupid and disgusting and I can't believe I ever did that. But that never felt right to me and now I realize that it's because I didn't have an understanding of why people smoke.

I was having a discussion with my professor for the substance abuse awareness class I am taking for teacher certification. She is a never-smoker. She asked me how I could stand being in a restaurant now, when somebody lights up. She told me how rude she considered it, and that her kids would sometimes go right up to the smoker and say something. She asked me if I supported the new ban on public smoking in New York.

Well, I don't go to bars or restaurants very often (too poor!). I don't love it when somebody across the room lights up. But I know now that they are not doing it to make me angry or to be rude. I never was, when I was a smoker. I just didn't consider it rude, really. I didn't know that the smoke was gross. All I knew was that I really needed to smoke.

When somebody in a restaurant lights up, I'm not sure the proper response is to boo or hiss. Mostly I just feel sorry for the person, because of course they are not trying to be rude--They are feeding an addiction. I've been very pleasantly surprised how much easier dealing with my own cessation from smoking, and the current smoking of others is when you see it as an addiction instead of as a habit.

Now that I understand how much maintening an active addiction was stealing from my life (up to and including my ignorant rudeness towards those surrounding me), I am finding it easier and easier to live with the idea of never smoking again. I still get craves but they are easy to blow off in light of the fact that the alternative is so grim. Conversely, I am finding it easier and easier to deal with current smokers, as well--not as evil, rude people, but as people who are under the power of a force that is stronger than they are.

Alex
1 month 4 weeks
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Joel
Joel

April 29th, 2007, 9:20 pm #30

From above:

This string serves as a reminder for those of us in countries that have altered such exposure. As we can see here not all of our members have that same luxury, some of our members are still in societies where smoking is a very accepted norm. Even these people should take heart and know that even when smoking was at its peak in America--people did quit smoking even though they were constantly exposed to the smoke of others.

Today many of us enjoy the ability avoid smoke most of the times. Hopefully over the coming years all of us will have this ability. Just know the way that you can minimize your own risk of smoking induced diseases is by you always knowing that to avoid the highest exposure to the thousands of chemical in cigarette smoke is by you knowing to never take another puff!

Additonal note here:

Even though some of our members who may live in countries or other places where smoking is unacceptable, they may still belong to social networks where smoking is still popular and even encouraged by other members of their groups. The original article and additional commentaries here address this issue.
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

July 25th, 2007, 11:31 pm #31

From: Joel Sent: 7/25/2007 10:06 AM
Governor signs statewide smoking ban

By David Mendell and James Kimberly

Tribune staff reporters

9:15 PM CDT, July 23, 2007

Smokers throughout Illinois soon will have to step outside or into a private setting to light up after Gov. Rod Blagojevich on Monday signed into law a smoking ban that extends to nearly all public places across the state.

The governor's action, which state health officials said makes Illinois the 19th state with a broad smoking ban, culminated nearly two decades of intense efforts by anti-smoking advocates to curtail smoking in public.

The law will take effect on Jan. 1, stitching together a patchwork of local smoking bans passed mostly in the Chicago area in recent years.

Blagojevich scrawled his signature on the bill at Northwestern Memorial Hospital amid hundreds of joyous medical professionals, cancer survivors, health advocates and other anti-smoking crusaders. They said this day was a long-time coming after years of lobbying village councils, small-town and big-city mayors, state lawmakers and, finally, the governor.

"For me, this has been a 30-year battle," said an emotional Barb Nation, a Springfield resident who lost part of her lung to a tumor that her doctor told her resulted from second-hand smoke in the workplace. "This is a new day, an amazing day."

Yet as the anti-smoking advocates cheered and hugged each other, tavern owners and smokers across Illinois had quite a different reaction. Bar managers criticized lawmakers for succumbing to political pressure that they said almost certainly will hurt, if not destroy, some of their businesses.

They were heartened, however, that the ban would extend across the state instead of being targeted to specific locales. Currently, 44 communities have smoking bans, and bar owners in no-public-smoking areas have complained that smokers are traveling out of town to hoist a beer and light up a cigarette.

"I think it's going to cost me a lot of money-I hope I can stay in business," said Bill Broukal, owner of Cuzin's Tavern and Pizza in Tinley Park. "I don't think the governor cares-whatever looks good for him. I think the governor should let the people decide."

At Jake Moran's pub in Mundelein, which allows smoking, response to the ban among the 10 or so patrons ranged from the merely angry to the unprintable.

"It's the General Assembly being our new nanny," said Wally Degner, 70, of Palatine, a pipe smoker for 50 years. "After this they'll ban foods that are too fatty. You'll have to ask the state what you can eat and drink-they'll start regulating hamburgers."


Some home offices hit The law will prohibit smoking in all public buildings and in most businesses and government vehicles. Smoking will be illegal in bars and restaurants, as well as places ranging from student dormitories to private homes in which businesses open to the public are operated.

Chicago's smoking ban took effect Jan. 16, 2006, and covered areas including restaurants, CTA train platforms and bingo halls. But free-standing bars and restaurants with bar areas were given until July 1, to eliminate smoking. The state law would hasten that ban by six months.

Local communities are still free to pass more stringent no-smoking bans with those local rules superseding the state law, named by legislators as the Smoke Free Illinois Act.

Ringing endorsements of Blagojevich's signature came from throughout the health care and anti-smoking communities. Advocacy groups such as the American Cancer Society, American Lung Association and American Medical Association have long waged campaigns to curb public smoking in the hopes of cutting back on overall smoking.

These activists filled the large conference room for Blagojevich's bill signing. They wore T-shirts that read, "8 people in Illinois die every day from second-hand smoke" and they held placards that showed a burning cigarette with the proclamation, "Weapons of Mass Destruction." They said up to 13,000 volunteers had worked over the years toward Monday's goal.

Activists hope that Illinois' action will keep momentum going for more states to follow suit.

Blagojevich said it took little persuasion for him to back the legislation.

"This law will save lives," the governor said. "The realities are that smoking kills people. . . .My only regret is that this took so long."


Smoker to try take-out That sentiment did not extend to all quarters, however. As she sat at a table on the outdoor patio of Jimmy's Grill in downtown Naperville, a Marlboro Light Menthol dangling from her fingers, Heather Pavlik said she considered the new law an affront to her individual rights.

"I think it's ridiculous that alcohol is legal and they are going to ban tobacco. It's just taking away citizen's rights. They're just pushing people around for no reason," Pavlik said.

Pavlik said the law will affect her behavior.

"This will change my attitude toward dining out," she said. "I'd rather stay home and eat take-out."

Restaurateur Jim Bergeron believes such attitudinal shifts will be common and will affect the bottom line of bars and restaurants. Bergeron and his father own Jimmy's Grill and Tessa's in Naperville.

"It is not good for the industry because it targets the regulars who make up the bulk of our profit margin," Bergeron said. "Smokers tend to go out three to four times more often than non-smokers."

Still, Bergeron called the full statewide smoking ban "the better of two bad alternatives."


chicagotribune.com

www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-070723n ... ylocal-hed

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