Health benefits, what are they?

Physical healing of the body and mind

Health benefits, what are they?

Gump19690
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

06 Feb 2007, 04:12 #1

Hello all....

Hope your having a great day..........been here for some time now and have read and watched as many videos as possible within Why Quit.

I have been quit for over a month and I am now looking for additional information of how my body can heal itself after years and years of smoking. I am aware of the "timeline benefits table", however I am looking for more. Is there more information out there that I havent found yet?

Will my lungs turn back to pink color?
Will arteries unclog themselves?
Am I still at risk for cataracts?
Will all the carbon eventually leave my body?
I had my blood pressure taken, by one of those automated machines at the pharmacy, and it was 111 over 78. I always heard 120/80 was normal, Is low blood pressure a symptom of smoking?
etc. etc


Thanks
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

06 Feb 2007, 04:21 #2

Will my lungs turn back to pink color?
Any hope for damaged lungs after smoking?
How long before you can get the lung function of a person who has never smoked?
Are lungs permanently destroyed

Has the "damage" been done?
Will lungs ever look better?



Will arteries unclog themselves?
Covered in here: How long does it take for different improvements to occur?
Will all the carbon eventually leave my body?
Your carbon monoxide levels return to that of a non-smoker within a week of quitting.
I had my blood pressure taken, by one of those automated machines at the pharmacy, and it was 111 over 78. I always heard 120/80 was normal, Is low blood pressure a symptom of smoking?
Smoking elevates blood pressure. 111/78 is in fact considered within a normal range. It would not be classified as low pressure.
Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

06 Feb 2007, 04:40 #3

"Am I still at risk for cataracts?"

Smoking does increase risk of developing cataracts. Quitting smoking reduces the increased risks that was posed by smoking.

Here is an abstract from JAMA that discusses this issue that also has numerous links to other articles discussing covering this risk.

http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/284/6/713

Smoking Cessation and Risk of Age-Related Cataract in Men
William G. Christen, ScD; Robert J. Glynn, ScD; Umed A. Ajani, MBBS; Debra A. Schaumberg, ScD; Julie E. Buring, ScD; Charles H. Hennekens, MD; JoAnn E. Manson, MD


JAMA. 2000;284:713-716.

Context Although cigarette smoking has been shown to be a risk factor for age-related cataract, data are inconclusive on the risk of cataract in individuals who quit smoking.

Objective To examine the association between smoking cessation and incidence of age-related cataract.

Design Prospective cohort study conducted from 1982 through 1997, with an average follow-up of 13.6 years.

Setting and Participants A total of 20,907 US male physicians participating in the Physicians' Health Study I who did not have a diagnosis of age-related cataract at baseline and had reported their level of smoking at baseline.

Main Outcome Measures Incident age-related cataract defined as self-report confirmed by medical record review, diagnosed after study randomization and responsible for vision loss to 20/30 or worse, and surgical extraction of incident age-related cataract, in relation to smoking status and years since quitting smoking.

Results At baseline, 11% were current smokers, 39% were past smokers, and 50% were never smokers. Average reported cumulative dose of smoking at baseline was approximately 2-fold greater in current than in past smokers (35.8 vs 20.5 pack-years). Two thousand seventy-four incident cases of age-related cataract and 1193 cataract extractions were confirmed during follow-up. Compared with current smokers, multivariate relative risks (RRs) of cataract in past smokers who quit smoking fewer than 10 years, 10 to fewer than 20 years, and 20 or more years before the study were 0.79 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.64-0.98), 0.73 (95% CI, 0.61-0.88), and 0.74 (95% CI, 0.63-0.87), respectively, after adjustment for other risk factors for cataract and age at smoking inception. The RR for never smokers was 0.64 (95% CI, 0.54-0.76). The reduced risk in past smokers was principally due to a lower total cumulative dose (RR of cataract for increase of 10 pack-years of smoking, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.04-1.10). A benefit of stopping smoking independent of cumulative dose was suggested in some analyses. Results for cataract extraction were similar.

Conclusion These prospective data indicate that while some smoking-related damage to the lens may be reversible, smoking cessation reduces the risk of cataract primarily by limiting total dose-related damage to the lens.

Author Affiliations: Division of Preventive Medicine (Drs Christen, Glynn, Ajani, Schaumberg, Buring, and Manson) and Channing Laboratory (Dr Manson), Department of Medicine, and Department of Ambulatory Care and Prevention (Dr Buring), Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Departments of Biostatistics (Dr Glynn) and Epidemiology (Drs Buring and Manson), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Mass; and Departments of Medicine, Epidemiology, and Public Health, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Fla (Dr Hennekens).

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Gump19690
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

06 Feb 2007, 04:56 #4

Thank you Joel...........
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Photo Larry
Joined: 27 Jan 2009, 18:29

10 Jun 2009, 22:10 #5

I am occasionally coughing up yucky stuff but little amounts. I just am curious what the normal healing process is so I can prepare. First let me say that I did not smoke a lot so curious if my lungs are damaged less than say a pack a day smoker (I typically smoked a pack in a week). Second, I just want Joel to give me an idea of how long it may take for the cilia to clean out my lungs back to normal? I have a slight ache in my chest since I quit and curious if this could be the lungs trying to heal. Appreciate any info. Thank you.
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SalGold
Joined: 06 Dec 2008, 17:54

10 Jun 2009, 23:15 #6

Hi Photo Larry,

Here are some threads that may answer your questions:

Cilia
Smoking's Impact on the Lungs
Masked or hidden conditions - healthier before quitting?
Medical advice - getting and giving it online

If you are concerned about the ache in your chest please see a doctor as we cannot diagnose for you.

No nicotine today!

ImageSal
Gold x 6
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Photo Larry
Joined: 27 Jan 2009, 18:29

10 Jun 2009, 23:55 #7

I am going to see him tomorrow just to make sure but after reading all those articles I am sure that smoking cannot cause me to be healthier! Indeed quite the opposite.
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