Have you noticed some of these "lost" long-term quits?

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

21 Jul 2004, 05:54 #71

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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

06 Aug 2004, 18:48 #72

I was recently informed that a friend of mine referred his friend over to www.whyquit.com and Freedom. His friend was off of smoking for 20 years and recently relapsed. I wanted to pop this one to the top in the event he is reading here.
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Rickrob53 Gold
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:03

10 Sep 2004, 01:38 #73

(for anyone who has lost a quit before, and doesn't want to lose this one)
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"Nicotine is nicotine is nicotine. Nicotine is stronger than you are, it has controlled you for years and maybe even decades. Even though you knew it was harming you and possibly killing you, nicotine made you keep delivering it over and over again day by day. You will not win this battle by being stronger than it, you will win it by being smarter than it. Use your intellect in this effort. Know your enemy inside and out. To stay in control, give up the idea that you can control nicotine. You can't control quantity. Your options are to smoke nothing or to smoke everything. This translates to you can stop delivering nicotine and live, or deliver it once and use it over and over again till it cripples and kills you. If you prefer the former, stay focused on to stay free of tobacco products and stay in control you must never take another puff!"

Joel
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CKay87
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 18:56

15 Sep 2004, 02:09 #74

Wow, this was a good one for me right now. I almost never come on here anymore because I am a year and a half into what feels like a very successful quit. Every now and then I'll be in a situation where others are smoking and inevitably I'll think - "hey, I could join them in just one." I never do because of the education I've received here from articles such as this one. I'm going to hang on to it - thanks so much.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

19 Nov 2004, 23:07 #75

One almost gold member just wrote that she had once lost a 10 year quit. Most clinics I do have at least one person who once lost a ten or more year quit. My last group had one man who had lost an 18 year quit. I have had two people in the past three years who had both lost 35 year quits. Any person can lose their quit no matter how long they have been off if they ever drop their guard. On the same token though, any person who has quit can maintain that quit forever if he or she simply keeps his of her ammunition reinforced and sticks to his or her commitment to never take another puff!

Joel
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Rickrob53 Gold
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:03

16 Mar 2005, 02:31 #76

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ivanochiki007
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

18 May 2005, 08:30 #77

" What I always thought was the greatest indicator of the addictive nature of nicotine is not how hard it is to quit. I think what better illustrates it is how easy it is to go back. That after being off for months, years, or even decades does not render a person "cured.""
The words above are so very true. I didn't find quitting that difficult. I have quit several times, for periods up to three years. So why go back?? Because it is an addiction and I will never be completely cured.
But this time I am not giving up. It is not difficult. I don't want to become a smoker again, so I will NEVER take another puff.
And why should I? It is not worth dying for! Ivano - free since April 6
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

17 Sep 2005, 19:10 #78

Nicotine is nicotine is nicotine. Nicotine is stronger than you are, it has controlled you for years and maybe even decades. Even though you knew it was harming you and possibly killing you, nicotine made you keep delivering it over and over again day by day. You will not win this battle by being stronger than it, you will win it by being smarter than it. Use your intellect in this effort. Know your enemy inside and out. To stay in control, give up the idea that you can control nicotine. You can't control quantity. Your options are to smoke nothing or to smoke everything. This translates to you can stop delivering nicotine and live, or deliver it once and use it over and over again till it cripples and kills you. If you prefer the former, stay focused on to stay free of tobacco products and stay in control you must never take another puff!

Joel
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Gormo Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

17 Sep 2005, 22:24 #79

Thanks Joel

Most appropriate for me today at Gold times three.

Gormo
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

17 Oct 2005, 22:38 #80

Being that I am bringing up a few posts relating to Peter Jenning's experience, I thought that this string seemed very appropriate to pop up. Peter Jennings had a 20 year quit that he lost during.

s it said in a Newsweek article just after the time of his death:
On April 5, 2005, he appeared, haggard and hoarse, for the for final time on television and explain what happened. "Yes, I was a smoker until about twenty years ago and I was weak and I smoked over 9/11." It is unclear how much he relapsed in the year since but he was still addicted and known to retreat into the bathroom for a furtive smoke. He began coughing and feeling fatigued last fall, but was not diagnosed until March. His cancer was inoperable, though he tried chemotherapy and experimental radiation.
Peter Jennings example here was the most high profile case I can remember of a famous person relapsing after being off for many years. No one should think though that this is a rare occurrence. At almost every clinic I do I will get multiple year quitters who relapsed, and people who are off for 5, 10, 15 or 20 year time periods are not uncommon. Since 2000 I had two people who were once off for over 35 years before relapsing.

No matter how long a person has been off, it is crucial that he or she understands that to continue to be able to stay off he or she must continue to stick to a personal commitment to never take another puff.

Joel
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