Have you noticed some of these "lost" long-term quits?

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

18 Mar 2003, 23:12 #61

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MsArmstrongKIS
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

19 Mar 2003, 05:51 #62

Thought I'd try to repair a little of the damage I did to the "Good news, our members don't relapse anymore" thread.

I know people who seem to be able to smoke only once in a while--you know, the "exceptions". But I am also only 23 years old, and most of those "exceptions" are younger than I am. Therefore, there is still plenty of time for them to bear out the one=all philosophy.

I also know plenty of people who had good, long quits going--2, 3, 4 year quits--who started smoking again as a result of a misbegotten cigarette at a party, or with a smoking friend. I've seen it happen. In fact, a good friend of mine is now a major league smoker, and when I first met him, he didn't smoke at all--he had quit for two years.

Personally, I have never quit for nearly as long as I have now, which in my opinion really proves to me that I'm decidedly living under the law of addiction. No question. Every time I've quit before I thought after a couple of days that I could socially smoke, now that I had broken my habit of smoking 15/day. Well, it didn't work then and I am not deluding myself any longer. I will never be a social smoker, just, in the words of O'Bob (or Hillbilly. . .can't remember which), a "plain old regular smoker".

The road of a thousand miles begins with one step. The road of a thousand cigarettes begins with one puff. If you don't want to go down the road, don't take the puff and you KNOW you never will.

Alex
1 month 4 days
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madisonsmom(DBLGREEN)
Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 23:23

29 Mar 2003, 03:50 #63

I had to share my story since I have lost a long-term quit. I quit smoking when I turned 30 and after a few months I felt better than I ever had in my entire life. I started working out, ran my first 5k and 10k and was loving every minute of it. I eventually reached the point where I could not be around cigarettes at all; breathing in other's smoke made my throat hurt and I could not stand the smell of it. I thought that I would never smoke another cigarette in my life - I never wanted to.

Well, close to three years later, I had a few drinks and was hanging with my old smoking buddies and decided to have one just to see what it would be like. The next day I bought a pack and smoked a couple and threw the rest out. I repeated this for a few days until I decided to go ahead a smoke a whole pack - didn't want to waste any money! Of course within two weeks I was smoking a pack a day again.

Well, here I am after smoking again for the last two years. Hopefully a little more educated than before and very determined to get that feeling back again! I have my sites set on an early winter 5K!

MM

One week, six days, 13 hours, 49 minutes and 28 seconds. 298 cigarettes not smoked, saving $58.24. Life saved: 1 day, 50 minutes.
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MsArmstrongKIS
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

12 May 2003, 10:11 #64

Joel. . .I am really wondering about something. My housemate had one cigarette yesterday at a party and she insists that it was just that one and that she's never going to smoke another one again. She quit two days before I did. I talked to my dad on the phone today and he said that a year after he quit he had one cigarette and he will always remember that one because it was so disgusting he realized that he never wanted to smoke again. And he hasn't for about 30 years, although now he smokes a cigar once in a while.

I am incapable of thinking about smoking just one cigarette. When I visualize it I can feel myself instantly wanting to go to the gas station and buy myself a pack. It's almost like I can feel the relapse process in my head before it even happens. So I know that smoking just one would never work for me, which actually makes it much easier for me to remain nicotine-free.

You can delete this post if you want because I know that it's not great to have examples of people who seem to fly under the radar of addiction but I just don't get it. I don't get why my father has a cigar once in a while and doesn't become a full-fledged smoker. I know I can't do that, there is not one doubt in my mind that I can't do that, but I don't get why other people seem to be able to do it.

Alex
2 months 3 weeks 7 days
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

12 May 2003, 10:47 #65

Read these posts, especially the comments I wrote in them today:
The relapse of a "social smoker" 38 5 IrishLotus (Silver) 5/11/2003 9:45 PM
The Lucky One's Get Hooked! 16 Joel. 5/11/2003 9:17 PM
Last edited by Joel on 31 Jan 2011, 05:25, edited 2 times in total.
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KereGreen2
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:03

03 Jun 2003, 23:19 #66

Joel,

I was having some difficulty seeing how these other people had quit for so long and then gone back. Reminds me, Never Take Another Puff.....

Kere
Two weeks, three days, 23 hours, 25 minutes and 42 seconds. 359 cigarettes not smoked, saving $111.45. Life saved: 1 day, 5 hours, 55 minutes.
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BubblyDoodlebug Gold
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:10

03 Jun 2003, 23:36 #67

I had quit for over a year once. I was miserable the whole time. I always wanted to smoke even if I was not around smoking. I felt as if I lost a love one. I grieved. This quit is not like that at all. I will be honest I have had moments where I felt like that but this time I understand my quit. Actually I don't remember why I started back, I don't even remember my cig when I started back. How weird is that??? The quit before this one I went back because I was told I was a nicer person when I smoked. That hurt my feelings so bad. I got in my car drove a block away and bought a pack. If I was told that now I would tell them "Go make new friends". Katherine
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jeanne
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

04 Jun 2003, 10:47 #68

I hope it's not too late in the day to respond to this post. I know I've mentioned my long term quit before in my 1st post probably, but after reading some of the posts here it got me thinking about my former quit of 10 years. It really is true about the education fact, the MAJOR difference between that quit and this one is knowledge. I had never quit before, and I was ignorant enough to believe because of that lack of knowledge, that I could have a few cigarettes and be o.k. It wasn't even a stressful situation that got me started again. I was away with a good friend on a trip to San Francisco, and I never knew she was a closet smoker for the 8 years I had known her at that time. We were having a bottle of wine on our hotel veranda, and she said want a cigarette?? After I got over the initial shock of realizing that she smoked, I said sure why not, I'll probably hate it. Well, I didn't like it too much at first, but then over the next few days of our trip, we had a couple more together. I didn't really start smoking right away on a regular basis when we returned home. About a month or so later, I encountered a stressful situation, and now I knew she smoked, it was the first place I went. If I knew then what I know now, not only about smoking addiction but about my self being an addict, I never would have accepted that first cigarette. Quitting truly comes from within yourself, you have to truly want it, but it is such an easier and safer process with knowledge. Thank you freedom!!! Jeanne F. 4 months 4 days and 8 hours
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

09 Feb 2004, 18:31 #69

I had one member in the group that I am graduating tonight who once had a 20 year quit. The group we have did very well, we only lost four members out of the original 28. (We had a few people who were not officially in the group, but who I was working with one on one because of travel and time issues making clinic attendance impossible.) Sadly, one of the four we lost was the person who once had the 20 year quit. No matter how long you have quit for the only way to keep this quit going and never have to face dealing with "trying" to quit again is to stick to your commitment this time to never take another puff! Joel
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Rhiannonsky
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 01:33

18 May 2004, 10:54 #70

Thank you for this string. It is so appropriate for me as I have lost several long term quits because I thought that I could somehow control my addiction to nicotine. I thought that I really could "just have one". However, I realize now that this is completely impossible. If I have one, I will have a pack and then I will be back to smoking full time. NTAP!!

Jen
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