Have you noticed some of these "lost" long-term quits?

NPannie
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:55

15 Jan 2002, 23:44 #41

Thank you, Joel.

How fitting that you should post this today. At 2:00 pm today there is a memorial service for a good friend's husband. He was 47, passed away at 2:30 Sunday morning. He was admitted to the hospital on 12/14 in severe pain. He only was able to come home for a couple of days after that. He spent from Friday till Sunday morning in hospice. He apparently had cancer of the liver, pancreas, and some spots showed on his lungs. He was gone so fast, I don't think they ever determined where the cancer started. As best as I know, he quit smoking 10 years ago. But, it sounds like it wasn't soon enough. I don't know if he relapsed, and don't want to ask. I can't make it to the service because I have an appointment with my pulmonary specialist. Kind of ironic. But you can know my thoughts and prayers will be with that family even though I can not be there for his service.

I hope I never get too comfortable with my quit to let my gaurd down. On my 6 month anniversary, I reread my first post and diary. Thank you so much for having us record this trying time, because your mind can still play tricks on you, even after 6 months. Last night I had the worst nicotine demon dream yet. It was like someone was whispering in my ear all night long "too bad you've been sneaking a smoke once a day. You haven't really quit. You just haven't made it back to a pack a day yet".
So, we addicts can never, ever let our gaurd down. Hard to imagine a dream being so hard to shake, but it really shook me up.

Loving my freedom.
Thank you all for such a wonderful website, you are saving lives daily.
I'll never, ever, take another puff!
Nancy
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Galemarie2
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 20:20

16 Jan 2002, 02:15 #42

This is such a timely post for me. About six years ago, I quit smoking for two years Went out with a few friends, had a beer, thought one wouldn't hurt. It has taken me six years to gather together the motivation to quit again. That's why I am grateful for Freedom. Everything I read here hones in on the addiction and the realization that I can never take another puff.

This is the fifth day of my quit and I hope that I hope I have the good sense to reinforce the message every day that I can never take another puff.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

23 Jan 2002, 18:33 #43

Image For Richit

As you will see, a lot of people lost long-term quits and all the relapses shared two things in common. First, while they all may have had different strories--none of the reasons were legitimate reasons to relapse to full-fledged smoking. Secondly, they all went back the same way, they took a puff on a cigarette. Even after 23 years it did in your quit. This should tell you something. It should tell you what it tells everyone else here...that if you want to stay smoke free you must understand the importance of knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

06 Mar 2002, 20:35 #44

Image For Betsybe:

Losing a 13 day quit is nothing--people can lose a 13 year quit or a 35 year quit if they ever think in terms of "a slip." A quit is only going to be successful over the long-term if over the long-term you always stay focused that to save your quit, your health and likely your life is as simple as always remembering to never take another puff!

Joel
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happycamper 67
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 18:58

09 Apr 2002, 20:01 #45

Wow Joel! #46 is really powerful stuff. Just what I needed! Thanks!
yqs,
maggie
day 425 CT
Never Question Your Decision To Quit
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

11 May 2002, 19:10 #46

As noted in a number of posts in this string, relapses are very rare here and we like to keep it that way. I know bringing up all these articles can seem like overkill when no one is talking about relapsing but when it comes to relapsing--no amount of prevention can be too much. For the sake of a person who relapses as well as for the sake of every other person here, the understanding and implication of a relapse must be understood in its entirety by everyone. Your very lives depend on accepting nicotine as an addiction and treating it as such. That treatment comes down to constantly reminding yourself that you never want to be a full-fledges smoker again and the way to avoid the life an actively using nicotine addict is to always remember that to stay free you must never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

16 May 2002, 19:40 #47

Image It was pretty interesting that in last night group, one man had once quit for 6 months, one woman for five days , one girl who was 17 had once tried to quit for two days, and one man who has smoked for 40 years had never tried to quit before. Normally in groups they get to witness more lost long-term quits to learn from--that did not happen here. So in the event that the four people read here, I am bringing up some post specific to this issue--that no matter how long a person is off they will lose their quit if they don't understand the bottom line law of addiction that to stay smoke free you must never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

07 Jun 2002, 15:37 #48

This clinic has been really interesting. We had one woman who once had a 20 year quit who lost it. Unfortunately she didn't make it this time around. We had one woman who had a thirteen year quit, and one woman who had two ten year quits lost. Off 10 years, on 5 years, off 10, on 5. We also had one man who had a few year quit going and relapsed on a cigar. He has been smoking and inhaling cigars ever since. The relapse happened in the mid 1970's.

The only way to insure you don't face a similar fate is to always remember to make this quit stick requires always staying reinforced and committed to never take another puff!

Joel
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OBob Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

13 Aug 2002, 09:37 #49

'bout time this resurfaced... Image
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

13 Sep 2002, 06:31 #50

As noted in a number of posts in this string, relapses are very rare here and we like to keep it that way. I know bringing up all these articles can seem like overkill when no one is talking about relapsing but when it comes to relapsing--no amount of prevention can be too much. For the sake of a person who relapses as well as for the sake of every other person here, the understanding and implication of a relapse must be understood in its entirety by everyone. Your very lives depend on accepting nicotine as an addiction and treating it as such. That treatment comes down to constantly reminding yourself that you never want to be a full-fledges smoker again and the way to avoid the life an actively using nicotine addict is to always remember that to stay free you must never take another puff! Joel
Last edited by Joel on 31 Jan 2011, 05:24, edited 2 times in total.
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