Have you ever embraced a crave?

Subconscious use cue extinguishment
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:03

20 Jul 2007, 10:47 #51

Congratulations, Gump, and thank you for always bumping this up, Sal. I'm Gold x3 plus and this is the only thread to which I still subscribe. It was a key to my successful quit, and to my life.

I learned within months of my quit that I had anxiety disorders and had been suppressing them (but not the problems they caused) for 30 years with nicotine. I also learned that there are healthy ways to actually treat anxiety, not simply suppress it like every cigarette (or gum or patch.)

From what I've gathered here, most people don't wind up needing meds or formal therapy, but for those who do, know that unlike with the vicious cycle of nicotine, you'll be getting your life back, in more ways than one. And it's nothing to be ashamed of; it's courageous and beautiful.

Embrace your crave, return to yourself, and Never Take Another Puff.

Love to all.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

07 Nov 2007, 10:58 #52

This really hits home for me. Rather than mask it by eating, drinking or doing something to get my mind of it I actually have let it hit me full on! Feel it, acknowledge it, cry if I must. Experience the crave and it does move on and then you actually feel stronger. It's the whole " what doesn't kill you makes you stronger".....

As long as you never take another puff!!!

Kristi
One month, one week, four days, 23 hours, 26 minutes and 49 seconds. 839 cigarettes not smoked, saving $209.88. Life saved: 2 days, 21 hours, 55 minutes.
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Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

10 Jan 2008, 10:23 #53

A crave will go away whether you feed it or not.
Not is a good choice!
Last edited by Sal GOLD.ffn on 23 Jul 2009, 02:34, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

26 Jul 2008, 07:21 #54

If I had to choose just one post for every newbie to carry at all times, this would be it !!!!!

If you haven't tried it, you should. It's so simple, it works, and it's a life saver.
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:05

28 Aug 2008, 12:09 #55

Thank you for this post, as a newbie I found this message so true and very inspiring. I am going to print this so I can read it often. I plan on embracing my craves, each and every one!

Tracey - 8 days Free
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Joined: 03 Mar 2009, 00:32

23 Dec 2009, 21:21 #56

After almost 7 yrs of being nicotine free last night for some reason I walked into a store and a guy was smoking. Usually the smell stinks and I can't stand it. But last night it smelt good!
I couldn't figure out why then I remembered a post from John the the cigerette companies do this on ppurpose! They will add chocolete or some other smell to lure us addicts to thier products!
I couldn't believe it! But then I remembered I'm an addict and I will always look for a reason to smoke. I'm just greatful I remembered that. Thanks John and Joel

Rickgoldx6
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Joined: 03 Mar 2009, 00:32

04 Jan 2010, 23:57 #57

jackrabit50 wrote:
After almost 7 yrs of being nicotine free last night for some reason I walked into a store and a guy was smoking. Usually the smell stinks and I can't stand it. But last night it smelt good!
I couldn't figure out why then I remembered a post from John the the cigerette companies do this on ppurpose! They will add chocolete or some other smell to lure us addicts to thier products!
I couldn't believe it! But then I remembered I'm an addict and I will always look for a reason to smoke. I'm just greatful I remembered that. Thanks John and Joel

Rickgoldx6
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Joined: 01 Oct 2010, 12:52

04 Oct 2010, 23:13 #58

Its only been a week for me but I have to say that this has been the most effortless quit I've ever done. I'm absolutely certain that I will never smoke another cigarette and this is primarily attributed to the first page I came across on this site on day 1 which was the Law of Addiction article. It made me realise for the first time since I started smoking 15 years ago how little influence I had in the "decision" to smoke. I always believed I liked it and often cited that as a reason why I still smoked. I don't like being conned and this is a huge motivator in the way I deal with cravings now.

When I get a craving I observe it almost as though it were a third party. I think of it as a salesman trying to sell me something I don't need for 365 easy payments a year for the rest of my life. Its obviously even worse than that. Sometimes I admire it a little bit thinking to myself: "Wow! Thats a really powerful crave. This drug truly is amazing!". I mean, you have to give it points for cleverness. But just like I might appreciate the skill involved in a good sales pitch, I don't buy it. I now know its a really bad deal no matter how its wrapped and I will never allow myself to be conned by nicotine ever again. I'm annoyed I was for so long. I find my cravings last about 10-20 seconds using this persepective.

So I wouldn't say I embrace cravings exactly, but I don't run away from them either. I'm more like an observer this time whereas previously I was an active participant completely absorbed in the story the salesman was telling me.
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Joined: 11 Nov 2008, 19:22

04 Oct 2010, 23:46 #59

Excellent Dave!  Nope, standing back and embracing are clearly two different things   What you're doing is being smarter than your dependency is strong.  Outstanding, literally!  Although your limbic mind screams that smoking is critical to your well being, your rational thinking mind now knows the truth.  It knows that your chemically captive limbic mind has no choice but to lie to you, that it's simply operating as designed, but by a non-intended master.  Be proud of yourself, Dave.  Still just one rule ... no nicotine today!

Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,

John (Gold x11) 
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Joined: 18 Jan 2009, 06:57

13 Oct 2010, 13:30 #60

The last paragraph of this Freedom Classic by John meant so much to me during early recovery.  I hope it can do the same for others now learning to live free of dependency.

Enjoy your recovery don't fear it.  Embrace and welcome each and every crave episode, as the arrival of each signals another time, place, location, event or emotion that you are about to reclaim.  Enjoy coming home.  There is a calm, quiet and free mind at the end, one that will go days, weeks and then months without wanting for nicotine.   But don't take my word for it.  Read the accounts of those you came before you!  Yes you can!

Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,

John
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Joined: 18 Jan 2009, 06:57

22 Mar 2012, 16:48 #61

[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]Enjoy your recovery don't fear it.  Embrace and welcome each and every crave episode, as the arrival of each signals another time, place, location, event or emotion that you are about to reclaim.  Enjoy coming home.  There is a calm, quiet and free mind at the end, one that will go days, weeks and then months without wanting for nicotine.   But don't take my word for it.  Read the [/font]accounts of those you came before you[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]!  Yes you can![/font]

[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,[/font]

[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]John[/font]
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Joined: 25 Feb 2012, 01:44

22 Mar 2012, 19:27 #62

amcanuck ( GOLD ) wrote: I decided a while ago that when I feel an urge to smoke ,I would give that my undivided attention. At first ,I would distract myself with other things.Now ,I face the thoughts dead on. I picture myself smoking and I remember what a let down the last one was. Then I forsee my dissapointment in myself. Then,by the time Im done doing all this in my mind,the desire has passed and I feel good.I know Im stronger than I ever thought I could be. So yes I embrace those craves because I think if you dont you will never be prepared for the bigger ones,the ones that are so tricky that you almost fortget how far you`ve come and that maybe if you could quit once you could do it again.I am getting fewer craves now ,sometimes most of a day will go by without a thought to smoking,and that is why when I do think about it I try to go through the whole process of relaspe in my mind,including the aftermath.amcanuck
this is so helpful, right now, at this moment. when I've come this far and try not to think about how far I have to go...a "seemingly" long time. I just don't want to be disappointed in myself again--at least, not for going back to smoking. so, no hiding from craves, no hiding from all of me...and each day becomes a day of pride while I watch the "relapse disappointment" slowly fade into the mists of the past.
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Joined: 18 May 2012, 15:22

21 May 2012, 18:31 #63

I have found this post very interesting.  I think in my first few days I embraced the craves, but for some reason I have started running from them and fearing them.   dont know why I have started doing this, but I am now going to face the next one head on and actually feel it!  Hopefully then I wont be as scared of them in the future!
Thank you for this

Suquimby
Six days, 20 hours, 31 minutes and 25 seconds. 68 cigarettes not smoked, saving £22.24. Life saved: 5 hours, 40 minutes.
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Joined: 22 Feb 2009, 23:36

26 Jul 2017, 16:22 #64

  It's been a long time since I've been here, but I was just wanted to share my account of this post because it has great significance to me. 

  I decided that I had enough of smoking, so I decided that I was going to quit (yet again). So with that, I went to the store, bought a box of patches and decided that the next day I was going to finally stop smoking. 


  The first day was pretty rough, but I managed to get through it. The second day though was torture. I was suffering! I had continuous anxiety and a constant rush of panic attacks. In fact, as it was nearing noon time, I decided that I couldn't quit and I had enough of these feelings of anxiety and panic. I was just too weak to quit smoking. I made the decision that when lunch time came around, I was going to go across the street and buy a pack of cigarettes. 


  So as lunch came, I started to leave to the store, but a voice told me to go to the computer to maybe look for some miracle pill that may help me quit later. I listened to this voice and got on the computer and searched quitting smoking. I found WhyQuit.com and this was the very first post I read. 


  As I began to read, I also began to step away from myself and really start observing myself. How much of this panic and anxiety was self induced? I realized that quite a bit of it was. It was this post where the penny dropped and I went from hopeless to a feeling that I really could quit smoking. In fact, I was so confident about this that I ripped off the patch right then and there and went home that night and threw all of my patches away. A few days later I joined WhyQuit.com


  Obviously, I never made it to the store that day and I have never smoked a cigarette since. That was over 13 years ago. 


  So to be a bit cliche, I am here to tell you new quitters, that you can quit, because if I can, I know you can. 


All you have to remember is to NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!


Eric


  
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