Have you ever embraced a crave?

Subconscious use cue extinguishment
Lilac (Bronze)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

29 Jul 2002, 03:47 #21

I read your article earlier today and it stuck in my mind for some time afterward. I was trying to decide if I am running away from "craves" or hiding or exactly what. Then I got busy after deciding that I don't really know what I do--would have to wait till the next episode developed.

Just now as I lay out linoleum on the den floor to cut for the little bathroom I had to laugh. Last week I would have run in terrror from reflooring a room. My creative juices were always fed and rewarded with cigarettes. when I got involved in relatively complicated activities. And here I am at the end of three weeks, snorting with frustration, concerned about getting my measuremets correct , rolling a heavy roller over the linoleum to straighten it--------and I am not out of breath, I am not tired. My legs are not heavy., and tho' I am thinking of cigarettes as you can tell by my message, I really can't say I want one. I still don't know tho' if I go out to meet my craves and hug them. Maybe time will tell.... Lilac
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Lynne
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 18:58

04 Aug 2002, 11:15 #22

Thanks for bringing this article up Roger. I did not know until I'd read through all the messages here that you had brought this thread up for me.
While I was reading the John's original msg, I kept saying, "Oops - that's me. That's what I've been doing. Running..." I get it. I finally get it. I have read several articles about triggers, but this one is the one that did it. I read the subject, "Have you ever embraced a crave?" HA! Ya gotta be kidding! Look forward to? Embrace? the crave that drives me CRAZY? But, I read the article, and I got it.
OKAY CRAVE - bring yerself on!
Lynne Image
Last edited by Lynne on 23 Jul 2009, 02:29, edited 1 time in total.
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Rzquit Green
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 18:58

06 Sep 2002, 11:36 #23

What a wonderful Post this is!I never thought of embracing a craving.. Thought they were to be feared... I was teetering.BAD.Cravings were real bad...Almost tearful.. Ate out tonight and the staff at the place were so confused where we should sit. Tried to show us our usual table in the smoking section. They were so used to us sitting in smoking section they argued among themselves as to where to seat us. . .. Looked at us like we came from outer space when kept requested non smoking. . However it felt good to sit in non smoking :-). I was afraid to go there tonight as we used to smoke there for many years....Very habitual place. Made it over that hurdle too. Nicotine free.. Still fighting back! Determined not to take another puff..
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

16 Oct 2002, 21:11 #24

A three minute crave will not give you emphysema. Would you like to compare the challege of a three minute crave to the challenge of having emphysema? Get a drinking straw and try breathing through it for an entire three minutes. Now imagine only having that many functioning alveoli for the balance of your life. Forget about exercise - out of the question. Your battle is to simply keep breathing.

A short crave anxiety episode can not cut you, break a bone or otherwise hurt you, while that one puff of nicotine for which it begs could very well bring with it a 50/50 chance of you receiving the death penalty.
Unlike smoking, the challeges of this adjustment period called quitting are temporary. The next few minutes are doable!
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long! John
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

27 Oct 2002, 03:12 #25

So much of what we feel is self-inflicted!
Relax and clear your mind of needless chatter!
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second chance (green)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

27 Oct 2002, 08:24 #26

Thank you, John for this post. I honestly believe this is the way I have been able to stay quit this time. I have "accepted" these cravings and understood that they will happen and that they need to happen so that I can heal myself. I believed that the cravings would get better after the nicotine was out of my system and it is true, they aren't nearly as bad and don't last very long. It is easy for me to think of something else when the craving occurs.
I have been anxious to meet the "other person" inside of me that I have forgotten about nearly all of my life. I want to love that person and take better care of her. Thanks for your wonderful perspective!!
second chanceImage
Last edited by second chance (green) on 23 Jul 2009, 02:30, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

28 Oct 2002, 05:12 #27

I was pretty beat-up after 30 years of defeats, Second Chance, and it was nice looking in the mirror and having a bit more respect for the fella looking back. As for the sense of comfort, roughly 90% of Freedom's members spent their ENTIRE adult life trying to keep up with the simple fact that one-half of their body's nicotine reserves were constantly being depleted every two hours. The endless cycling between need and feed was draining. The dopamine tub doesn't overflow anymore but it doesn't get empty either. It's almost like the tub is always a little more than half-full and the water never gets cold. It's nice! The next few minutes will be doable Second Chance! John : )
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Roger (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

27 Nov 2002, 09:30 #28

Image Still great reading John. I believe this principle is an integral key to an earlier comfort level. Fully understanding it requires just a slight adjustment of the big picture. Perhaps a slight change in ones attitude.
Last edited by Roger (Gold) on 23 Jul 2009, 02:31, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

01 Apr 2003, 10:58 #29

Riding Robust Dreams to Freedom

What is the inner source that will allow you to stop smoking nicotine, skip those once mandatory feedings, and resume full control of your life? Strength, willpower, desire?

It would be natural to think that it's a combination of the three but none of us are stronger than our addiction, as is clearly evidenced by our inability to live the drug addict's first wish of being able to control the uncontrollable. You cannot beat your dependency into submission, stand toe to toe with it, or handle one puff of nicotine and prevail. Nicotine's chemical bond with the brain's reward pathways is beyond the reach of strength.

Willpower? Yes, we can each temporarily muster mountains of willpower but can willpower make any of us of us endure a challenge that we lack the motivation to complete? Can you inhale, chew or **** nicotine into your body and then "will it" to not travel to the brain's addiction circuitry or create the chemical need for more? Have you ever been able to order or command the challenges of chemical withdrawal or psychological recovery to cease? If we are incapable of using strength to control our addiction and we cannot "will" our chemical dependency into hibernation or submission, then what remains?

As simple as it may sound, dreams and desires born of honest recognition of tobacco's impact upon our life have the amazing ability to fuel change, but it takes keeping those original honest motivations in the forefront and driver's seat of our mind so that they can both consciously and subconsciously guide us home.

The successful quitter finds ways to protect and safeguard their primary motivations so that they remain robust, alive and available at a moment's notice to fuel the patience needed to transition this temporary period of adjustment called "quitting." The intelligent quitter's strategy combines an understanding of the law of addiction - one puff of nicotine equals relapse - with well-protected core motivations.

The successful quitter does not try to forget what their health was like while smoking, what it felt like to be controlled, the growing sense of becoming a social outcast, or that feeling as we stood at the tobacco counter and paid our hard earned money to purchase the more than 4,000 chemicals contained in each cigarette that would slowly destroy our body and mind. The successful quitter keeps such memories - and others - in the forefront of their mind as honest reminders and motivations to fuel their dreams and desires.

The intelligent quitter realizes that if they allow their motivations to die that it is very possible their freedom and healing will die along with them. The intelligent quitter finds ways to fuel their motivations, just one day at a time, through study, understanding, education, skills development, critical observation and honesty. They know that they are 100% guaranteed to continue free today if they'll only maintain and protect their original day #1 genuine desires to ... Never Take Another Puff!
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long! John
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

19 May 2003, 08:12 #30

From: Storm_ Sent: 5/18/2003 6:03 PM
Maybe my head is still in a fog, because I have read this over and over and I don't get it. How do you embrace a crave? Does it mean to accept it for what it is (a crave) and deal with it the best you can? Today has been a bit challenging, but so far, I have rode it out. I felt like I was sure to lose it earlier, but I think I'm ok now, thanks to my husband. He talked me through it. I've had trouble getting anything done today. I didn't even want to get myself cleaned up, but I made myself do it anyway. I really feel abnormal in my way of thinking today. Anybody else felt this way too??

Storm, this has been reposted so that the .exe file link you attached could be removed. Please review our Our Courtesies as all external links need to be cleared in advance through one of the managers.

As for this post, sitting around fearing the arrival of the next crave can be draining. An objective of this post was to try get members to see that much of the anxiety we feel during early recovery is self-inflicted. It was my hope that members might lose some of that anticipation type anxiety if they would only allow themselves an opportunity to experience a crave for what it really is - a brief anxiety event that can not hurt you. John
Last edited by John (Gold) on 23 Jul 2009, 02:28, edited 2 times in total.
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