Gums, Dreams & Aunt Jemima

Gums, Dreams & Aunt Jemima

Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 20:57

29 Dec 2003, 22:38 #1

Ok, so I'm on my 17th day and I've noticed some bizarre things.... First, my gums are supersensitive. I remember my dentist once telling me that as a smoker, I didn't bleed as much as non-smokers. So, could it be that since I quit, my gums are now going back to what should be normal?

Also, I'm dreaming about smoking. I've had several dreams where I purposely decide to begin smoking again. So, technically, in the dream I was quit, but then I relapsed. Why am I having these?

Lastly - and this is the strangest one yet... every once in awhile I smell this strong odor of pancake syrup. This has happened at least a half dozen times now... lol.. it's so weird. Just out of the blue, it permeates the air... I don't even eat pancakes/waffles/french toast etc.

Can anyone shed some light on these minor, yet odd, syndromes?

Peace & Love,
Kim - Fabulously free for 2 weeks, 3 days, 10 hours (and counting)
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:01

30 Dec 2003, 00:00 #2

First of all, congrats on you quit. I don't know about the gums or syrup but many of us have had the smoking dream(s). It is quit normal. Take a look at this link below:

Dreams of smoking

Hang in there. It will get better.

Bob
I have chosen not to give in to my junkie thoughts and inhale 4000+ chemical compounds and 43 known carcinogens into my lungs for 5 Months 3 Weeks 1 Day 14 Hours 59 Minutes 57 Seconds. Cigarettes not smoked: 3512. Money saved: $878.12.
Life gained back to share with future grandchildren 3 Wks 3 Days 9 Hrs 24 Mins 59 Secs
YESSSSSS!!!!!!
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Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 20:57

30 Dec 2003, 00:46 #3

Please don't take this as a medical declaration, but I do remember reading that cigarette smoke is an antiseptic -- no surprise considering some of the nasty industrial-waste type chemicals in it! I read somewhere that there can be a brief period of higher susceptibility to oral infections and such, because of the antiseptic qualities of cigarette smoke. Sounds like something worth checking with the dentist though.

The smoking dreams seem to be pretty common, and in fact are well known to anyone who has quit an addictive drug (not limited to nicotine). I've had a bit of past experience with NA, and "drug dreams" are a well known phenomenon.

As far as smelling strange odors, it seems to me that in the first month of a quit it could just be the ol' sniffer repairing itself. But that might be worth checking out too, particularly if it branches out to other strange odors at unusual times. Smelling strange odors can be a sign of certain diseases.

yqb,
Tim

-- Nicotine free for 4 days, 11 hours and 19 minutes. 89 cigarettes not smoked, saving $20.12. Life saved: 7 hours, 25 minutes.
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 01:47

30 Dec 2003, 00:47 #4

Kim, Congrats on your quit. The dreams are quite common for us. It is
horrifying when I have them, but soooooo great when I realize it was just a
"dream." I haven't heard of smelling syrup before, but I have been craving
pancakes. Keep up the great quit. jery 41 days quit

-----Original Message-----
From: kimmers722 [mailto:kimmers722@hotmail.com]
Sent: Monday, December 29, 2003 8:39 AM
To: Freedom From Tobacco - Quit Smoking Now
Subject: Gums, Dreams & Aunt Jemima


-----------------------------------------------------------

New Message on Freedom From Tobacco - Quit Smoking Now

-----------------------------------------------------------
From: kimmers722
Message 1 in Discussion

Ok, so I'm on my 17th day and I've noticed some bizarre things.... First,
my gums are supersensitive. I remember my dentist once telling me that as a
smoker, I didn't bleed as much as non-smokers. So, could it be that since I
quit, my gums are now going back to what should be normal? Also, I'm
dreaming about smoking. I've had several dreams where I purposely decide to
begin smoking again. So, technically, in the dream I was quit, but then I
relapsed. Why am I having these? Lastly - and this is the strangest one
yet... every once in awhile I smell this strong odor of pancake syrup. This
has happened at least a half dozen times now... lol.. it's so weird. Just
out of the blue, it permeates the air... I don't even eat
pancakes/waffles/french toast etc. Can anyone shed some light on these
minor, yet odd, syndromes? Peace & Love, Kim - Fabulously free for 2
weeks, 3 days, 10 hours (and counting)

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Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

30 Dec 2003, 01:05 #5

Hi Kim,

Here's an interesting article:
How's Your Blood Flow?
You're healing and doing great, yay YOU!

Sal
Eleven months, two weeks, three days
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Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 18:58

18 Jan 2004, 21:16 #6

I may be a bit late in replying to this post, but I've only been here a few days. I wanted to say something about memory and oders. Let me point out that this is not mental health diagnostic information, as these symptoms do overlap with some serious (and not so serious) mental health conditions and difficulties... and it is only my personal opinion.

Approximately 5 days into my quit I noticed the strangest thing: The return of long term memories that I hadn't thought about in ages. ...Just some silly, but great, childhood memories. I did recognize that I had a flood of them for a few days. Coupled with this, is the fact that I am one who uses ol factory sensations in memory (like others use audio or visual images, mine is linked to smell, secondarily but strongly.) So... I also noticed an increase of sudden orders appearing at different times. I was asking my husband things like, "Do you smell cotton candy? I smell cotton candy!" Etc. etc. I do this often, so I wasn't alarmed, just noted that it had seriously increased.

I read somewhere that smoking was linked to the loss of long term memory, and I was thinking that these two concepts may be related in the mental cleansing of nicotine. What do ya think?

Astonished
1 week, 4 days, 8 hours !!!
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

18 Jan 2004, 21:31 #7

Hi kim
When we quit our sense of smell starts to come back to its original quality,i don,t know why you are smelling pancakes,is it possible that it is a childhood memory,you might be remembering a smell that was familiar to you before you became an addict,smoking actually causes or accelarates gum disease,i had the opposite effect my gums got better after a few months and did,nt bleed as easily,see your dentist about this one,you have the smoking dream thread and basically the tar that is coming through your saliva is triggering a smoking dream.
Rickdabler 10 months 1 week 2 days 10hrs happily nicotine free.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

18 Jan 2004, 22:40 #8

You're not alone Kim it finding your gums getting more oxygen while experiencing far less nicotine induced vasoconstriction while also being fed far less carbon monoxide. Although not yet fully explained, there is new study evidence suggesting that the increased incidence of bleeding may actually be independent of gingival health and more associated with gingival epithelial thickness.
Can't seem to put my hands on it now but there is an older study which found that the average smokers has an average of three fewer teeth in older age than their nonsmoking counterpart.
As for the smoking dream, please read Joel's article that Bob linked for you.
Tim, I've never read any study indicating that ex-smokers sustain a greater rate of infections than smokers. Increased circulation is not necessarily a bad thing. Please take care in not feeding the junkie mind too many excuses to get their antiseptic back. Thanks. Also, you might want to read Joel's Dreams of smoking too as horizontal healing lungs loaded with a tremendous suppy of tars reflecting the chemicals consumed drifting up to meet a healing sense of smell and taste pretty much assures the new ex-smoker a vivid dream.
Only one rule, no nicotine today, Never Take Another Puff! John

Gingival bleeding on probing increases after quitting smoking.

Journal of Clinical Periodontology 2003 May; 30(5): 435-7.
Nair P, Sutherland G, Palmer RM, Wilson RF, Scott DA.

Department of Periodontology and Preventive Dentistry, Guy's, King's and St Thomas' School of Dentistry, Kings College, Guy's Campus, London SE1 9RT, UK.

BACKGROUND: Gingival inflammation associated with plaque accumulation is delayed or impaired in smokers. Anecdotal evidence suggests that smokers who quit experience an increase in gingival bleeding.

METHOD: A group of 27 subjects on a Quit-smoking programme were examined for changes in gingival health over a 4-6-week period.

RESULTS: The bleeding on probing with a constant force probe increased from 16% of sites to 32% of sites, despite improvements in the subjects oral hygiene.

CONCLUSION: This provides further evidence that tobacco smoking affects the inflammatory response and that these changes are reversible on quitting.

PMID: 12716336 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Tobacco smoking and periodontal hemorrhagic responsiveness.

Journal of Clinical Periodontology 2001 July; 28(7): 680-5.

Bergstrom J, Bostrom L.

Department of Periodontology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

OBJECTIVE: The influence of smoking on the periodontal hemorrhagic responsiveness was investigated in 2 different populations, one exclusively consisting of patients with established periodontal disease, the other of dental hospital admissions in general.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: The hemorrhagic responsiveness of the patient was clinically found from "bleeding on gentle probing" expressed as the relative frequency of bleeding sites (%). In the periodontal patient population, gingival bleeding was assessed by 1 examiner with known probing force, whereas in the dental hospital admissions population assessments were done by a great number of non-calibrated examiners with unknown probing force.

RESULTS: Smokers exhibited a significantly lower hemorrhagic responsiveness than non-smokers. This held principally true for both populations but the effect was much more clearly detectable in periodontal patients than in dental hospital patients in general. A dose-response effect was typically evident in the periodontal patient population. Accounting for the periodontal disease severity, however, the effect of smoking became clearly detectable also in the general patient population.

CONCLUSION: Tobacco smoking is associated with a clinically suppressed hemorrhagic responsiveness of the periodontium.

PMID: 11422590 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 20:57

15 Feb 2004, 12:15 #9

This message has been deleted by the author.
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

15 Feb 2004, 13:02 #10

From: mocha_0030 (Original Message) Sent: 2/14/2004 11:08 PM
My gums have been terribly sore since approx 3 days into my quit. They hurt when I floss AND brush. No bleeding... just intense soreness. Anyone else experience this? It's better today than it was yesterday, thankfully.


I've been free of my nicotine addition for 1 Week 6 Hours 27 Minutes 13 Seconds, avoided smoking 181 disgusting cigarettes, and saved $59.06! The best part is I've added 1 Day 6 Hrs 17 Mins 13 Secs to my life!
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Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 20:10

16 Feb 2004, 10:21 #11

Interesting thread - I did notice that during the second week of my quit I kept smelling Cup of Noodle - Funny cuz we don't eat that! lol Another thing I noticed is that my gums are super sensitive, that just started this week. And of course I have had many dreams about smoking - at first they were all about my husband smoking then it was about me. They seem to have dissipated recently. Anyway - I know this thread was started a while back but since I just found it I thought I'd post my experiences on this topic.

Take good care all and NTAP!

Tammy - I have chosen not to smoke for 3 Weeks 1 Day 18 Hours 7 Minutes 5 Seconds. During this time I've not smoked 341 cigarettes at a savings of $56.32 and I've reclaimed 1 Day 15 Hrs 49 Mins 15 Secs of my life.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

16 Mar 2004, 20:19 #12

Smoking cessation increases gingival blood flow
and gingival crevicular fluid.

Journal of Clinical Periodontology 2004 April; 31(4): Pages 267-272.

Morozumi T, Kubota T, Sato T, Okuda K, Yoshie H.

Division of Periodontology, Department of Oral Biological Science, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata, Japan.

Morozumi T, Kubota T, Sato T, Okuda K, Yoshie H: Smoking cessation increases gingival blood flow and gingival crevicular fluid. J Clin Periodontol 2004 doi: 10.1111/j.1600-051X.2004.00476.x. Copyright Blackwell Munksgaard, 2004.
Objectives: The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of smoking cessation on gingival blood flow (GBF) and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF).

Material and Methods: Sixteen male smokers (aged 22-39 (25.34.0) years), with no clinical signs of periodontal and systemic diseases, were recruited. The experiment was performed before (baseline) and at 1, 3 and 5 days, and at 1, 2, 4 and 8 weeks after smoking cessation. The status of smoking and smoking cessation was verified by exhaled carbon monoxide (CO) concentration, and by serum nicotine and cotinine concentrations. A laser Doppler flowmeter was used to record relative blood flow continuously, on three gingival sites of the left maxillary central incisor (mid-labial aspect of the gingival margin and bilateral interdental papillae). The GCF was collected at the mesio- and disto-labial aspects of the left maxillary central incisor and the volume was calculated by the Periotron 6000(R) system. The same measurements except for the GBF were performed on 11 non-smoking controls (four females and seven males), aged 23-27 (24.41.2) years.

Results: Eleven of 16 smokers successfully completed smoking cessation for 8 weeks. At 1 day after smoking cessation, there was a significantly lower CO concentration than at baseline (p<0.01). Also, nicotine and cotinine concentrations markedly decreased at the second measurement. The GBF rate of smokers was significantly higher at 3 days after smoking cessation compared to the baseline (p<0.01). While the GCF volume was significantly increased at 5 days after smoking cessation compared to the baseline (p<0.01), it was significantly lower than that of non-smokers until 2 weeks after smoking cessation (p<0.01).

Conclusion: The results show that the gingival microcirculation recovers to normal in the early stages of smoking cessation, which could activate the gingival tissues metabolism/remodeling, and contribute to periodontal health.

PMID: 15016254 [PubMed - in process]
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

07 Jul 2006, 00:32 #13

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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

14 Nov 2006, 09:27 #14

Hi!!!! I just wanted to say that your sense of smell improves GREATLY when you quit smoking. Maybe there is a maple syrup smell around you and always has been but you just haven't noticed it before. I can smell someone smoking from 2 blocks away! My food also tastes and smells much more intense.

Beth
I have been quit for 4 Weeks, 23 hours, 1 minute and 19 seconds (28 days). I have saved $260.62 by not smoking 1,737 cigarettes. I have saved 6 Days and 45 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 10/15/2006 8:26 PM
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