General warning about getting a cold or flu after quitting

Physical healing of the body and mind

General warning about getting a cold or flu after quitting

Joel
Joel

December 18th, 2004, 10:28 pm #1

General warning about
getting colds or flu after quitting


All recent quitters need to be aware of two things that can happen when getting cold or flu near the time that they quit smoking. First, a cold may be more annoying than normal. If anyone gets a cold within a few months of a quit, it is often a really uncomfortable one. The reason being not only are you producing excessive mucous from the infection itself, but since your Cilia are still in the process of cleaning out of the built up mucous that has been accumulated over the years and decades that never had a chance of coming out before, the amount of congestion and the symptoms can really make a person miserable.
Also, with nerve cells that have now regenerated throughout your whole respiratory tract functioning normally, you can feel pain and irritation that were dulled when you were a smoker. It may have taken you a little longer as a smoker to even know when you were getting sick. With impaired nerve cells you may not have felt earlier symptoms, or if you did you may not have been able to differentiate what was just an effect of smoking too much or of actually having some sort of infection. With nerve cells back in place you are likely not going to be overly tempted to smoke for the concept of pouring hot irritating smoke on an already irritated throat is generally not a pleasant thought.

Where you do have to be careful and aware is that when your cold starts to dissipate, you might get stronger than normal thoughts for cigarettes. For while you likely cut back on cigarette consumption when you were a smoker with a cold, when you started to get better you would have to make up for lost time, or more accurately, for lower than normal nicotine levels since you had instinctively cut cigarettes down to a bare minimum in those times. This makes the first time getting well a potentially powerful trigger. Just be aware of the fact and it will help you to minimize the effect. Then know that over your lifetime, your colds will probably be less frequent, resolve quicker and be less severe as long as you always remember to never take another puff!



Joel

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Last edited by Joel on March 4th, 2011, 1:08 am, edited 5 times in total.
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BillW Gold.ffn
BillW Gold.ffn

February 16th, 2005, 11:18 pm #2

Hi......

Just a wierd comment on Joel's observations above. While I would cut back on smoking with a cold, especially a cold with a bad cough.... I would still try to smoke enough to stop the coughing. Since smoking suppresses coughing, I saw those few cigarettes as a very perverse form of cough medicine. For me, that made the "Got A Cold" trigger a little more intense, until I realized just how insane it was......

BillW free and healing for Three years, one week. 33091 cigarettes not smoked, saving $6,452.87. Life saved: 16 weeks, 2 days, 21 hours, 35 minutes.
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LEHarris52
LEHarris52

February 17th, 2005, 12:49 am #3

The cool thing I've noticed over the last "almost" year is that I just am not getting those colds anymore. I used to count on a "summer cold" and a "winter cold" every year, with a cough that lasted a long time after. I think I might have gotten my one and only cold since quitting smoking a few weeks ago, but it was so mild, I'm not even sure it was a cold. Just another FANTASTIC benefit to being a Quitter!!

Laura in KY
hmmm.......I seem to have lost my quit counter for the moment, but I do know it will be one year next Tuesday!
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elrandou
elrandou

April 21st, 2005, 6:49 pm #4

What amazes me the most in this extraordinary site is that I find the answers to every single case and issue that may concern both smoking and quitting!! It is three days now that I caught a terrible cold. "Normally" (I mean when I was smoking) I used to catch cold twice a year: first around November and once more around May. But this time my throat feels so irritated and I have such pain when I swallow, I have never felt so badly before! And it was a very unpleasant surprise for me, because I thought that since I quit, sickness will be easier to deal with! So, I came here to seek for comfort and … I found the explanation for what is happening to me! And that is much more important and helping . When you know what and why is happening, you can fight it more effectively. Needless to say, I'm very proud to not even think about smoking!

Thanks Joel, your post helped me a lot!

Lena, (sneezing, coughing, aching but determined to NTAP, NTAP, NTAP!!!)

almost 16 days smoke-free, 312 cigs not smoked, 34,94 € saved, 1day 2:00 life saved
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kattatonic1 gold4
kattatonic1 gold4

April 21st, 2005, 11:54 pm #5

Learning all this was HUGE for me! The sickness triggers were my most annoying.
When I needed to learn, Freedom was a united team of pedagogues! For those who are new to this topic, check this link out:
Nicotine is not medicine / Triggers when I'm sick
And guess what! That was my very last trigger!! Woohoo!!
Kay (Gold)
Celebrating 16 months of Freedom in 2 days!
Last edited by kattatonic1 gold4 on March 13th, 2009, 12:04 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joel

November 10th, 2005, 8:53 pm #6

Where you do have to be careful and aware is that when your cold starts to dissipate, you might get stronger than normal thoughts for cigarettes. For while you likely cut back on cigarette consumption when you were a smoker with a cold, when you started to get better you would have to make up for lost time, or more accurately, for lower than normal nicotine levels since you had instinctively cut cigarettes down to a bare minimum in those times. This makes the first time getting well a potentially powerful trigger. Just be aware of the fact and it will help you to minimize the effect. Then know that over your lifetime, your colds will probably be less frequent, resolve quicker and be less severe as long as you always remember to never take another puff!
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Prettihart
Prettihart

January 10th, 2006, 9:22 pm #7

This post was "right on time". I'm going on 9 days and got a cold about 4 days ago. My lungs are really "burning". I never did cut down when I was sick, only making the duration and severity of my cold worse, and worse than that I have asthma. So...thanks for the post. I do have to admit I'm a bit bummed cause I was looking forward to things easing up a little after day 14. But its not worth going through this quit process again.
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LeoEx Smoker
LeoEx Smoker

February 3rd, 2006, 5:32 pm #8

Hey Oldbies,

I read somewhere on the site about the point that BillW raises above - sorry I'm a newbie and I can't remember where this was! It's a post about cigarettes having brochodilators in them (I think) so that we smoke more/ingest more nicotine or something... and that's why smoking, bizarrely, helps when you have asthma.

Does someone know where that post/article is?

My Dad used to say that when he was a kid, when he had an asthma attack he'd sneak outside and have a cigarette, and it would be better. He thought it was counter-intuitive but swore by it. I found the same with asthma attacks in my 20's. The first time I realised why that was so was when I read this website.

Amazing eh. My Dad found that out practically all those years ago, but never knew why.

Cheers,

Leonie

Leo - Free and Healing for One Month, One Day, 8 Hours and 54 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 3 Days and 22 Hours, by avoiding the use of 1133 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $499.18.
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Joel
Joel

February 3rd, 2006, 7:36 pm #9

From the string "You Were a Lot Healthier Before You quit Smoking!":
From: Joel Sent: 6/24/2003 2:24 PM

This post brings up such an important point to work with your health care providers in the event that something seems wrong after quitting. For some people things may just happen at some point in time after quitting that were going to happen whether they had quit smoking or not. In a few other people, conditions that may have actually existed when they were smoking and were being masked may now present noticeable symptoms for the first time .




Either way, there are likely treatments available for these conditions if they just get properly diagnosed. What it so ironic is how a people can be afraid to go to a doctor for risk that he or she may prescribe a medication for a problem that smoking was "treating" and now the patient is afraid of the side effects of the new medication.



Well in the case of the bronchodialators you had said you found out were in cigarettes, the prescribed medication may be the same as ones found in smoke, but now not being accompanied by the thousands of other chemicals, poisons and cancer causing agents that they were delivered simultaneously with your cigarettes. Everyone should know for a fact that there is no drug that is ever going to be prescribed that carries a one in two chance of being fatal--and cigarettes do carry that risk.

Life goes on after quitting. Most people do in fact get healthier and don't develop such reactions from quitting. But there are people who do have masked problems or problems that were being treated by medications already that may require dose adjustments after quitting. This is because your body eventually returns to normal after quitting.



Normal doesn't mean what it was like the day before you quit, normal means returning to a state that your body was designed to be in before you ever took up smoking--with aging thrown in. No one knows what that normal state is until they get there--and for some people normal is a state where they have some chemical imbalances or conditions that may require medical intervention. It can be very uncomfortable or even dangerous to ignore such conditions and just write them off to not smoking.



So again, for those of you who quit and feel great, know that this is a common reaction and you should be grateful that things have gone the way they have. For those of you who have discovered problems, know too that this is possible but there are likely therapies of one sort or another to make these problems better and you should not put up with sustained suffering any longer than necessary. Both groups should know that they are healthier since they quit for the mere fact that they did quit and will likely stay healthier, smell better, have more control over their life, and likely live happier and longer as long as they always remember to never take another puff!



Joel
Last edited by Joel on March 2nd, 2010, 2:57 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Starshinegrl Gold
Starshinegrl Gold

February 4th, 2006, 6:15 pm #10

Last edited by Starshinegrl Gold on March 13th, 2009, 12:13 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joel

June 10th, 2006, 8:03 pm #11

Where you do have to be careful and aware is that when your cold starts to dissipate, you might get stronger than normal thoughts for cigarettes. For while you likely cut back on cigarette consumption when you were a smoker with a cold, when you started to get better you would have to make up for lost time, or more accurately, for lower than normal nicotine levels since you had instinctively cut cigarettes down to a bare minimum in those times. This makes the first time getting well a potentially powerful trigger. Just be aware of the fact and it will help you to minimize the effect. Then know that over your lifetime, your colds will probably be less frequent, resolve quicker and be less severe as long as you always remember to never take another puff!
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Rayne
Rayne

September 6th, 2006, 11:00 pm #12

oh my gosh that is why I feel so miserable. Thank you so much for the heads up on the possible trigger when I feel better. Now I can prepare myself. The kids are still running around having fun even though they have runny noses and the cough. I feel like I have some exotic flu. Yuck.
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Joel
Joel

November 19th, 2006, 1:01 am #13

Video version of this string:
Title Dialup High Speed Audi Length Date added
Getting colds and flus after quitting 1.46mb 11.10mb 1.46mb 10:04 11/18/06
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The Bald Belgian
The Bald Belgian

December 19th, 2007, 11:48 am #14

Hi All,

Currently on my second cold in about 3 weeks, and the volume of phlegm and mucous that is being cleared from my body is astonishing. Buckets! The first couple of days were uncomfortable with a mild fever, but now it is just annoying, having to clear my nose and throat every 10 minutes or so. My nose is sore.

The amazingly liberating feeling accompanying this illness is that every time I blow my nose, I realise, and consciously feel, that my body is slowly healing. And that by itself is an exhilerating feeling. Going back and destroy all that again with nicotine? NEVER!!!

Stay strong.

Best wishes.

Bald Belgian Bob
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Joined: November 13th, 2008, 2:04 pm

March 12th, 2009, 9:54 pm #15

Video Title Dial Up High Speed MP3 Audio Length Created
Getting colds and flus after quitting 1.46mb 11.1mb 4.57mb 10:04 11/18/06
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FreedomNicotine
FreedomNicotine

October 23rd, 2009, 10:56 pm #16

........... when you started to get better you would have to make up for lost time, or more accurately, for lower than normal nicotine levels since you had instinctively cut cigarettes down to a bare minimum in those times. This makes the first time getting well a potentially powerful trigger. Just be aware of the fact and it will help you to minimize the effect. Then know that over your lifetime, your colds will probably be less frequent, resolve quicker and be less severe as long as you always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
Last edited by FreedomNicotine on October 24th, 2009, 2:20 am, edited 1 time in total.
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kevintaylor
kevintaylor

June 10th, 2011, 10:10 pm #17

I just started this cough today.My son has a cold he's trying to get over.When you've quit smoking how long does the cough usaully last?
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FreedomNicotine
FreedomNicotine

June 10th, 2011, 11:30 pm #18

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