General Comments About the Use of Zyban

General Comments About the Use of Zyban

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

25 Oct 2004, 07:56 #1

General Comments About the Use of Zyban

In some ways I am pretty neutral with the use of Zyban. Zyban is not a nicotine replacement so does not perpetuate the withdrawal state. Because there is no nicotine involved I don't feel it undercuts a person chance of quitting like nicotine replacement products can. I have had people in my clinics that have quit while using Zyban. In all honesty though, I didn't see them do any better or worse success wise than the others in their groups.

While during the initial quitting period while in the clinic you couldn't really see any differences in the people taking Zyban when compared to those who were not using it. Where differences would sometimes become more noticeable though was a few weeks after the clinic was over. Then I would see that clinic participants who were still on Zyban were having side effects not happening to the other clinic graduates who quit at the same time as them. The most notable complaint was sleep problems that went much longer than one would normally expect for those who do not use Zyban.

Because of the extended side effects I personally question whether it is really worth the longer-term side effects and expense if it isn't making a real difference in success? On the other hand, would some of these people not have even started their quits without the feeling that it was really going to make the difference?

I do think more people take it than really need to but if a person does not experience unwanted side effects and his or her doctor thinks that he or she should take it and the person does actually quit, well then he or she is off smoking and that is what is important. Again, I suspect that the person could have done it without the medication, but since the person is off that belief is a moot point.

I am troubled when I see people report on the board that they can't quit smoking because they can't tolerate the medication. They are feeling handicapped before they start to quit and they are giving the drug too much credit. Again, you can quit with it if it is tolerable and you and your doctor feels it is safe for you to use. You can quit without it too if you really want to stop and are willing to put in the effort it takes to quit. That is the truth in both cases though, with Zyban or without. Your quit will succeed either way if you always understand the importance of knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

30 Oct 2004, 03:03 #2

Image
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

07 Dec 2004, 02:15 #3

Who's testing, who's telling?
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kattatonic1 gold4
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

31 Dec 2004, 16:25 #4

To new quitters using Zyban:
I'd like you to understand that if you give up on Zyban,
there is no reason to give up on your Quit.
I quit with Zyban because I was afraid I couldn't do it without aids and I knew 3 people who successfully quit using Zyban. Zyban was not good for me. I took it for the required 10 days to 2 weeks before quitting and then quit smoking. Even after that initial adjustment time, Zyban was not for me. It was like I was on Speed Overdrive X 3. My doctor was keeping tabs on me and 5 days into my Quit we agreed to give up on the Zyban, but I remained quit of nicotine.
I post this because I now know 3 additional people who tried to quit with Zyban and couldn't tolerate the drug either. They stopped taking the drug and also gave up on quitting smoking... that is, they relapsed because "the Zyban didn't work". The Zyban was not what did the quitting. I did the quitting.
Through the education available at Freedom and WhyQuit (and questioning my doctor), I realized that I quit Cold Turkey with or without the Zyban whether I knew that at the beginning or not. It was a Cold Turkey quit even during the five days when I was on Zyban because I withdrew all nicotine from my system. I was not replacing one form of nicotine with another (like you do with the patch, the gum or another NRT).
I considered smoking when I made the decision to quit the Zyban. What classic junkie thinking... "It's not working; so how can I quit? I'll have to find another method." Thanks to the education here, I realized that the method I was using was actually Cold Turkey. Zyban might have made it easier for me, like it did for the 3 successes I know, but it didn't. Allow me to repeat what I said above:
The Zyban was not what did the quitting. I did the quitting.
If you are reading and quitting and using Zyban, that's fine. I hope the Zyban helps (like it did for the couple I know who it helped). If it does or doesn't help, understand for certain that you own any clean time you rack up. You get all the credit. Hot baths made quitting easier for me. They might drive other people crazy. I cannot say that hot baths quit for me. I did the quitting.
Welcome to Freedom. Read all you can. Giving up nicotine is the best thing you can do for yourself.
~ Kay (Gold) ~
Celebrating 1 Year, 8 Days, 21 Hours and 47 Minutes of Freedom.
Forsaking 7478 doses of poison has liberated $2,430.16 and 25 Days and 23 Hours of my life.
Last edited by kattatonic1 gold4 on 03 Nov 2009, 11:07, edited 1 time in total.
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JoeJFree Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

02 Dec 2005, 04:31 #5

This message is written with the hope that for somebody - just like I was 1-year ago - happens to be researching or reading at this revolutionary resource, FreedomFromTobaccoQuitSmokingNOW.

Early in December of 2004 is when I first found WhyQuit.com through a link on the ALA site's quit smoking resources section. I thought it too 'harsh'. I guess I was not ready to face reality, my reality.
The second time I found WhyQuit and subsequently 'Freedom' I literally had my coat on and a script for Wellbutrin from my doctor in my hand. I kid you not, script in hand I was on the way to the Pharmacy to get it filled cause I knew it was time for me to quit smoking. Matter of fact - I'd known it had been time for me to quit smoking for about 20 years. Wellbutrin was the last 'magic bullet' I had not tried. A neighbor friend had quit smoking using the twin drug Zyban. She had also subsequently relapsed in less than three months. I must admit that fact , her failure to quit for good, did disturb me. Awful expensive way to test a seemingly better but not fool proof method. But I had to use SOMETHING I thought at the time! I'd tried everything else!!
So just after lunch on 1/9/2005 I sat down at the computer and typed in 'quitting smoking with wellbutrin' in a google seach bar. I was curious about side effects. I was curious about effectiveness. On that day (it no longer does) whyquit again came up as a top choice with this article NRT - do quitting aids work? So I stopped to read what was said about the drug. The Law of Addiction was linked in that article. Then I read some more about the drug nicotine. Then I read about getting rid of nicotine and getting back control of me. And then a little later on I saw John's graphic of 'The Cycle of Addiction' and a LIGHT went onImage. The light of understanding. The light of truth.
An hour or so had passed. My coat was now off, the script was in the garbage can under the desk in the study. After about 40 years of constant nicotine use I quit that day and after a session with Just one little puff I inhaled my last nicotine hit at 10:15 the next morning and QUIT

You don't need anything else to 'help' you quit smoking.
You need No 'Program', No Pills, No Patches, No Pieces of Gum, No Potions, No Powders in capsules.

To quit smoking you just need to - QUIT SMOKING!
All you need is Motivation, Determination and Education to Never Take Another Puff , No Matter What. The relatively short period of adjustment to Your journey to comfort that is the quitting part and it can be challenging. But the rewards on the other end of that period of adjustment are immeasurable.
Don't believe it? Spend an hour or two reading the TRUTH from thousands of Successful Quitters whose stories are shared in the archives of this forum who have quit for good, quit for Life - by simply sticking to an unbroken committment to NTAP!
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on 03 Nov 2009, 11:15, edited 1 time in total.
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ZZRSteve GOLD
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:01

02 Dec 2005, 09:05 #6

"To quit smoking you just need to - QUIT SMOKING!"

Lifted from the above post..... and how true! Now, I've tried nicotine gum with miserable results and I've tried that step down method you may have seen as well with just as miserable results. I might even have tried Zyban or Wellbutrin but I couldn't because it wasn't allowed because of my job. Somehow, I instinctively knew that cold turkey was the way to go anyway. Luckily, I found WhyQuit.com and FFT and all the education available here and there has proven to me, at least, that cold turkey is the most effective way to rid yourself of your nicotine addiction. Some people may be able to quit using some other method and more power to them. The bottom line is you gotta get the nicotine out of your body for the healing process to truly begin and the quickest way to do that is...... you guessed it.....Cold Turkey! Good luck to all you quitters out there.....but you don't really need luck if your resolve to Never Take Another Puff (NTAP). Those people who NTAP have a 100% success rate and never, ever relapse. Think about it. Steve 18 months.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

14 Jan 2006, 20:38 #7

I am troubled when I see people report on the board that they can't quit smoking because they can't tolerate the medication. They are feeling handicapped before they start to quit and they are giving the drug too much credit. Again, you can quit with it if it is tolerable and you and your doctor feels it is safe for you to use. You can quit without it too if you really want to stop and are willing to put in the effort it takes to quit. That is the truth in both cases though, with Zyban or without. Your quit will succeed either way if you always understand the importance of knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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julez4you
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 01:43

15 Jan 2006, 08:11 #8

It's funny how this topic came back around today- I started a script for Wellbutrin on Monday in hopes of helping to lesson some of the turbulent emotions I was having after quitting.

Unlike many, I didn't visit the Dr. prior to setting my quit date and take the medication for the 2 weeks preceeding. I only thought to try this prescription after I had been off nicotine for almost a week.

The last 3 nights I've suffered from insomnia. I get tired at the normal time and have no problem falling asleep initially. But then I wake up 2-3 hours later with my mind racing and I can't get back to sleep no matter how hard I try. It also seemed as though my heart was beating more rapidly than normal.

I decided this morning to stop taking the meds. I guess it just wasn't for me. Just thought I'd share my experience. -Julie
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

31 Jan 2006, 07:17 #9

I am troubled when I see people report on the board that they can't quit smoking because they can't tolerate the medication. They are feeling handicapped before they start to quit and they are giving the drug too much credit. Again, you can quit with it if it is tolerable and you and your doctor feels it is safe for you to use. You can quit without it too if you really want to stop and are willing to put in the effort it takes to quit. That is the truth in both cases though, with Zyban or without. Your quit will succeed either way if you always understand the importance of knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

31 Jan 2006, 22:30 #10

I wanted to add a comment here. You will notice that the title I gave this string was "General Comments about the Use of Zyban." I purposely did not make the title "General comments about Wellbutrin" or "General Comments about Bupropion."
I think people need to be aware that Zyban is a medication that a doctor can write for a patient wanting to quit smoking. Generally, if the prescription is written as "Zyban," most health insurances won't pick up the cost.
Wellbutrin is a medication that a doctor can write a prescription for that many if not most insurance companies will pick up. I just think people need to be aware that the reason that insurance will cover the cost of a Wellbutrin prescription is that by writing the prescription as "Wellbutrin," the physician has in the view of the insurance company made a diagnosis of depression in the patient's medical record.
I have had a few clinic participants report that this procedure has gone on to cause problems for them. Months or years after quitting smoking, when some people went on to get life insurance or health insurance, they were not given preferred rates because they had recent bouts with depression. This came as a surprise to these people for as far as they could recall, they had never been particularly depressed and as far as they were concerned, they were never treated for depression. Their medical records indicated otherwise though because they were given Wellbutrin by their physician.
I had one clinic participant who never even filled the prescription and yet who was impacted by the fact that her medical record had indicated that Wellbutrin was prescribed for her. My comments in the original string here about Zyban is really only about Zyban. We wouldn't comment on Wellbutrin for we have always had a strictly reinforced policy in place at Freedom about giving and getting medical advice--and any discussion about a prescription drug to treat a medical condition is not allowed at Freedom. All questions involving prescription medications should be taken up with your personal physician.

Related readings:

Normal depressive reaction or real organic depressive episode?
Last edited by Joel on 03 Nov 2009, 11:17, edited 1 time in total.
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