Freedom's Best Crave Coping Tips !

Subconscious use cue extinguishment
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:02

05 Jan 2004, 23:21 #51

Congratulations to alll of our newbies for making the decision to TAKE YOUR LIVES BACK! And thank you all for reminding me what it felt like to be in the first week of withdrawal. I sure as heck NEVER want to go back to that! Here's a thread I thought you might enjoy...please feel free to add YOUR tips for meeting, greeting, and defeating those craves!

I know when I first started this battle I kept a rubber band around my wrist. Whenever the crave hit really hard, I would twist this band around in my fingers to help with that "I need to do something with my hands" feeling. Remember, celebrate your victories...and every crave beaten is a victory!

YQS-

Lotus~ 468 Days
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

08 Jan 2004, 03:51 #52

Hi friends,

I am a newbie, but I have found a wierd thing that works for me.

I keep a small container of my favorite hand/body lotion in my fanny pack. (I have room for that now, because I'm not trying to jam in a packet of cigarettes!).

When I am visiting friends or family and I feel a craving, I pull my little container out and put some on my hands. I think this works for me because I like the smell. It's such a treat not to smell smokey hands.

I've been free for 1 week, 3 days, and nearly 2 hours. I'll NEVER take another puff!
Reply
Like

Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:40

22 Jan 2004, 01:11 #53

My favorite smoke of the day was always the one that I had when I first woke up. I would roll over, turn off the alarm, turn on the news and light a cig. I'd spend some time coughing up the **** that my lungs had cleaned out overnight and smoke my cig. My hubby would do the same and we would not speak or get near each other while we went through this routine.

Now that we both have quit, we roll over stretch and take a deep breath, turn on the news and snuggle while we wake up. So, I guess my coping tip is to spend some time close and snuggling with someone you love and enjoy the fact that you will be able to snuggle that much longer since you have added time to your life.

Kelly - Free and Healing for Nine Days, 5 Hours and 5 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 15 Hours, by not smoking 184 cigarettes that would have cost me $30.50.
Reply
Like

Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:40

23 Jan 2004, 05:39 #54

I'm sure this one is listed somewhere, but I like to take a brisk walk. I'm fortunate in that the company I work for has literally miles of hallways. When cravings hit, sometimes I'll just get up and go for a walk. If it's nice outside, I'll go for a walk outside. Stairs would probably work too, but we don't have any long flights of those in this building.

One other that I can think of that really works - coming here and reading. But then, if you're reading this, you already know that. ;)
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

23 Jan 2004, 12:04 #55

There are several things that help me during a crave. Thankfully these are happening less often and are much less intense. One thing I do is wash my hands. For some reason that helps. If I am not where I can wash my hands, I have some great smelling lotion I put on. I like the smell and it gives me something to do. Shower definitely help a lot. I'm sure I could come up with more, but those are the main ones I have used almost daily to get me to this point. Hope that helps.

************************************************************************************
Lady H
Happily healing and smoke free for Two weeks, three days, 23 hours, 32 minutes and 10 seconds. 719 cigarettes not smoked, saving $71.92. Life saved: 2 days, 11 hours, 55 minutes. 
Last edited by LadyHouck on 18 Feb 2014, 14:04, edited 3 times in total.
Reply
Like

Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:40

23 Jan 2004, 13:10 #56

Stomping around and huming a tune. By the time Im done with the song Im laughing so hard I forgot to smoke.

~MS~

15 Days Freedom
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

17 Apr 2004, 23:26 #57

cold cranberry juice also provides such a kick and gives a nice boost to blood sugar if i'm feeling particularly crabby; ice cold water has been working for me as well. both are great for killing any craves, they keep my mouth busy, and i can bring a bottle with me in the car.
i've also been brushing my teeth after i eat to reprogram my ritual of smoking after i have finished. who wants to smoke after having such nice breath?

Never take another puff.

ahnaka
six days, 11 hours, 54 minutes and 27 seconds. 97 cigarettes not smoked, saving $20.71. Life saved: 8 hours, 5 minutes.
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

18 Apr 2004, 02:00 #58

Change Something!
After day 3, I stopped dealing with physical cravings and was now dealing with psychological triggers -- though some psychological triggers certainly have their physical manifestations. Anyway, my brain takes cues from what I am doing and cues from the environment, compares them to my memory banks and says, "Time to smoke" when it finds similarities. Consciously changing something small seems to break most connections. I have done the following when experiencing a trigger:
  • Moved furniture in each room around slightly
  • Moved the plants
  • Driven a different route
  • Walked on the other side of someone I often walk with
  • Exit out a different door
  • Changed my purse
  • Rearranged the items on my desk
See what I mean? Even switching something from my left to right hand or vice versa when a trigger comes up helps disassociate it with the scene or event. You don't have to do it all the time. I drive a different route home from work once every week or two and the rest of the time I still don't think about smoking in my car any more. Our brains are amazing things.

NTAP! This is a great thread.

~ Kay ~
Celebrating 3 Months, 25 Days, 8 Hours and 29 Minutes of Freedom.
Forsaking 2327 doses of poison has liberated $748.23 and 8 Days and 1 Hour of my life.
Reply
Like

Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:31

19 Apr 2004, 10:44 #59

I found cleanning something to be a good distraction. Clean a window or the glass on a painting near where you smoked and look at the brown smudges on the paper towel. Then think about that gunk on your lungs.

Jenny
Enjoying 36 days of freedom
Last edited by jennyissilver on 18 Feb 2014, 14:10, edited 1 time in total.
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

19 Apr 2004, 11:40 #60

Deep Breathing and healing appreciation. It's hard to believe how well it works for me.

Every day I can breath deeper and it may be my imagination, but these deep breaths "taste" sweeter in my healing lungs everyday. That might not make much sense but it works for me.

When a trigger hits, I take a deep breath, remember how it was to wake up that morning without coughing, and tell myself that if I give in and have a ****, I will lose the ability to take deep breaths and my morning cough will come back and just like that; the trigger passes and I go on living without smoking.

Also, as time passes, I find myself doing it more and more just for pleasure as my triggers become less and less frequent.

It'a great as a coping mechanism as it needs no special equipment to perform and you can do it anytime, anywhere. All you need is air and your own lungs.

Lee
Put down the sickerettes 1M 3D 21h 43m ago. 1,396 **** unsmoked. $244.32 saved and already spent on other things...
Reply
Like

Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:40

25 Jun 2004, 04:42 #61

I usually drop down and do some push ups, that or dips, or I run or something.

Exercising my way through a crave is also helping to keep my weight in check during the first couple weeks of my quit.
Reply
Like

Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:40

16 Jul 2004, 08:56 #62

These are great ideas. Thanks for sharing. My fave. Now that my smeller works better the air seems to smell stale( maybe old cig smoke?) so I spray something. I like the " Pure Citrus" orange freshner best but in a pinch or for a change I'll spritz on some fresh perfume.


Vonnie
2M 3W without nicotine... thanks to you all & Freedom
Reply
Like

Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:35

28 Sep 2004, 02:40 #63

I stay busy! I haven't stopped for much more than sleep and food for two weks. I'm getting so much stuff done it's great! After that I just remember there is no such thing as one puff. That does it for me.
DeWitt
I have been quit for a little more than 13 days. I have saved $34.68 by not smoking 277 cigarettes (that's allot a smoke!). I have saved 23 hours and 5 minutes of my life. I WILL N.T.A.P. THERE CAN NEVER BE ONLY ONE!
Reply
Like

Ann
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:02

29 Sep 2004, 05:09 #64

Okay, I have one. Next time you have a crave, find someplace where you can observe smokers (perhaps preferably from a distance). One woman in particular has been almost a blessing for me (and that is very selfish, but . . .). She goes outside to smoke as all smokers do and as she inhales she coughs and hacks that nasty wet mucousy cough. Then she takes another drag. I don't know--maybe this isn't a good coping technique, but it puts me right off!
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

29 Sep 2004, 06:24 #65

Yesterday I had the first real serious consideration to use tobacco that I have had since the first week of my quit.Sure there have been fleeting thoughts and urges but nothing like this on. I thought; "I will just get a can and have one chew" this time I was seriously considering it.

So.....I used Joel's wisdom and asked myself "Do you really want all the additional doses that goes with that first dose of nicotine?" and "The odds are stacked against you, in that you may never have another quit in you!" and the final weapon was "Is it worth it?"

That would be my tip, since it worked for me.
Kevin, NicFree & Luv'n It for 103 days. I quit chewing tobacco on 6/17/04, have not spent $516.70 on copenhagen.
Reply
Like

Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:40

29 Oct 2004, 12:18 #66

I just made it through week one myself but I hope this advice helps an even fresher newbie.
I read that thing on theWhyQuit site about how nicotine releases stored sugars and fat to your brain within seconds. (it's almost like slamming fat and sugar into your veins....mmmmmrrrgh - slurp - yum. A big part a the first few days of withdrawal is due to low blood sugar. That factiod saved me from smoking for the first 72 hours. I kept drinking juice and eating fruit in SMALL AMOUNTS almost as often as I would've smoked (once an hour at least) and saying to myself, "You can wait 20 minutes until this sugar kicks in just like every other normal person does. You are so used to instant gratification...anyone can wait 20 minutes." This was the easiest first week EVER. I've managed maybe 2-3 times in my life to make it a week or more but I remember it being HORRIBLE. Couldn't think/sleep/concentrate/feelSANE. AWFUL! This time was 80% better! Keep hydrated and eat healthy snacks like apples 'n stuff, it will make the first 3 days tolerable anyway.
Also: Look at all these people on Freedom who have made it! Doesn't it just blow your mind?
-K8
Last edited by K8ster591 on 16 Mar 2009, 22:02, edited 1 time in total.
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

18 Nov 2004, 02:10 #67

When I get a crave, I keep saying to myself, remember, I don't smoke anymore. This works for me most of the time. I have also cut drinking straws and chewed on them or pretended I was smoking while driving in the car during the first few days. A friend who quit with me was having a bad day today. I made her a copy of the Stop Smoking Recovery Timetable with photos included at the end. This seemed to help her after we cried for awhile. Thanks again for all the info. You can do it! Barb
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

18 Nov 2004, 05:10 #68

I step out on the front porch and take af ew deep breaths of fresh air, or I busy myself making a cup of chamomile tea...by the time I have the cup of tea ready, the craving is gone.
Reply
Like

Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:40

18 Nov 2004, 15:44 #69

Today is my 12th day off . My Crave Coping Tips are :

1) Changing the phrase: "I must not smoke" into "I don't want to smoke.
2) Walking/Jogging
3) Drinking a glass full of water in slow sips
4) Taking a bubble bath with candles lit and listening to an audio book or nice music, wearing a face mask and a hair mask - good treatment :o)
5) going shopping ;o)

Stay Nicotine free and do not give up on yourselves: you are worth it!
Love Oxygentle
Reply
Like

Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:40

23 Dec 2004, 22:41 #70

I am "cleaner" than I ever have been in my life! Sometimes, when I am in the shower, I run the hot water tank empty! But, when I am at work or otherwise cannot take a shower, I have found something nice and low fat: Chocolate mint candy canes! They are also helping ease the withdrawal from "what to do with my hands." Yesterday, I even took my candy cane outside to the designated smoking area in the parking lot to wish my former smoking friends a Merry Christmas (on vacation now until next week.) I had to stand a good distance away from then though, as the smell was unbearable!

Julie
1 week 3 days 13 hours 40 minutes!
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

07 Jan 2005, 07:39 #71

Read through all the replies to this thread to take advantage of the experiences of so many who've gone before!

I recommend dancing and singing with the music up LOUD. It gets you through the crave and uses your healing body to actively celebrate at the same time!

Alyson
Gold Club
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

07 Jan 2005, 07:44 #72

I'd have to say during my first 2 weeks, I was soooooo clean from showering/bathing perpetually.
Last edited by Just Gie Gold on 18 Feb 2014, 14:16, edited 1 time in total.
Reply
Like

Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:01

07 Jan 2005, 08:19 #73

Nothing beats a good, old fashioned walk. Raining? Who cares? Dark? Who cares? Little kids at home? Put em in the stroller and have at it. My $0.02.
Steve 7 months, 24 days.
Last edited by ZZRSteve GOLD on 16 Mar 2009, 22:03, edited 1 time in total.
Reply
Like

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

09 Oct 2005, 20:10 #74

I saw where a newer member wrote that she picked up on the idea of using cinnamon sticks to help her quit smoking and got the idea from a suggestion on our board. I only found a few strings that ever mentioned cinnamon sticks, and all of them that I could find except this one had the link to Crutches to Quit Smoking attached to them. While some people may have made comments of what they did in this string, no one should feel that all suggestions by individuals should automatically be construed as good ideas. Any item of practice can become of crutch. Below is the full text to the string Crutches to Quit Smoking that discusses the implication of crutch replacement. Other strings addressing this issue are
"Do whatever it takes to quit smoking" and Conventional quitting wisdom.


Crutches to Quit Smoking


"Boy did I ever drink my brains out, today," a clinic participant enthusiastically proclaimed, "But I did not smoke!" She was so proud of her accomplishment. Two whole days without smoking a single cigarette. To her, being bombed out of her mind was a safe alternative to the deadly effects of cigarettes.

Just 24 hours earlier I had made a special point of mentioning the dangers of replacing one addiction with another. In quitting smoking one should not start using any other crutches which might be dangerous or addictive. But this was not of concern to her. She said, "I already have a drinking problem, so what more could go wrong with getting drunk to quit smoking." Twenty minutes into the program, she stood up, passed out and had to be carried out.

Quitting by crutch replacement carries varying degrees of risks. Turning to any other addictive substance, even legal or prescribed drugs, carries the risk of a new addiction. In many of these cases the end result will be a more significant problem than just the original smoking. The new addiction can cause the person's life to end in shambles, and when it comes time to deal with the new dependance he or she will often relapse to cigarettes.

Turning to food, especially high calorie sweet foods, will usually result in a psychological need with a subsequent weight gain. The risk of weight gain is insignificant in comparison to the dangers associated with cigarettes. The ex-smoker would have to gain over 100 pounds to create the equivalent health hazard of cigarette smoking. But weight gain often results in a state of panic and frustration which can lead the ex-smoker to conclude that he or she would rather be a skinny smoker than an obese ex-smoker. The fallacy which causes the ex-smoker to reach this conclusion is that only two options exist for him or her - smoke or eat more. In fact, other choices exist. One is not smoking and eating in a manner similar to when he or she was a smoker. Another is increasing activity levels to compensate for the added caloric intake when eating extra amounts.

Some people turn to a healthy alternative as a crutch, like jogging or swimming. These activities carry low risk and, in fact, often result in physical benefits. But if they are being done as a direct crutch in maintaining abstinence, they pose one major threat. As with drugs, alcohol, or food, when the day comes that one must stop the activity, the seemingly successful ex-smoker will often relapse. Sometimes a minor ankle sprain will temporarily end a jogger's running, or an ear infection will interfere with swimming. What should be a temporary minor inconvenience ends in a tragic result - relapse to cigarettes. Again, the ex-smoker believes that only one of two states exist for him or her - either smoking or mandatory exercise. But, in actuality, a third choice exists, not smoking and doing nothing. This is not to say an ex-smoker should not take up physical activities after quitting. But exercise should be done for the enjoyment and for the true benefits derived from it. The ex-smoker should do it because he or she wants to, not because he or she has to.

If you are going to develop a crutch, make sure it is one which you can maintain for the rest of your life without any interruption. One that carries no risks and can be done anywhere, anytime. About the only crutch which comes close to meeting these criteria is breathing. The day you have to stop breathing, smoking will be of little concern. But until that day, to stay free from cigarettes all you need to do is - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!


Last edited by Joel on 14 Apr 2009, 12:19, edited 1 time in total.
Reply
Like

Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:01

08 Jan 2006, 10:34 #75

The best thing for me is to come to this site and read - calms me right down!
Libby - 7 weeks, 3 days quit
Reply
Like