Eileen D (GOLD)
Eileen D (GOLD)

11:13 PM - Jun 01, 2002 #41

I too started smoking when it was so cool to do, and to this day that is my worst junkie thought. it's almost like I am not myself without the cig in my hand. I never realized how it controlled so much of my life.It was the first thing I did in the morning and the last thing at night. like all addicts I always said that I could quit whenever I wanted to and I still really believe that .All my other quits failed because my heart wasn't in it and I didn't want to quit. This time I made up my mind to do it and with the help of everyone at freedom I did it. I started smoking when I was 15 and I quit on May 1st 2002 ------- I turned 56 on May 13th 2002
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Reasons
Reasons

10:57 PM - Jun 06, 2002 #42

Congratulations on your quit! I just passed my one -year mark and am feeling so good! I know that you still have cigarette thoughts, but after a year, the only cigarette thoughts I have are that I am soo glad I quit. Hang in there and everyday will be better and you will be sooo very proud of yourself. Freedom is the key word here. Freedom is wonderful!
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

7:02 PM - Jul 10, 2002 #43

With so many younger members still in their 20's arriving here at Freedom, it can be easy for them to use the fact that many longer term smokers, such as those who've posted to this wonderful thread, continued smoking and eventually broke free. It's true, no doubt about it but a tremendous price is paid for each year of bondage.
The damage, decay, and destruction inflicted upon the human by the 4,000+ chemicals present in each burning cigarette is gradual yet continuous. Although we can't see the carbon monoxide destroying the lining of every blood vessel in the human body nor nicotine causing the release of stored facts, it happens a bit more with each puff.
Yesterday Kris71780 posted about a study in which physicians found that "the broken legs of cigarette smokers took an average of 276 days to heal while the non-smokers' legs took 146 days." I found it hard to believe so I did my own search and apparently it's true.
http://www3.utsouthwestern.edu/library/ ... okbone.htm
That's 130 days difference in healing time. Why? Think about oxygen, blood supply and a vascoconstrictor called nicotine. Other studies show that vascular damage starts very early in a smoker's life. Circulatory disease kills far more smokers than lung cancer. How clogged are your young arteries?

Smoking and Circulation

Medical Implications of Smoking

I can't quit or I won't quit.
Last edited by John (Gold) on 11:21 PM - Mar 11, 2009, edited 2 times in total.
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

6:53 AM - Jul 26, 2002 #44

For Lilac - you'll need to to use left and right controls at the top or bottom of the page to move back through the posts, as there are some wonderful stories by lots of fantastic graduates who have a few less years than 55 but not too many! Celebrate each day of freedom and healing as a full and complete victory all on its own! Today is doable!
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Lilac (Bronze)
Lilac (Bronze)

11:56 PM - Jul 29, 2002 #45

Well, crum, I posted my "story" this morning and then noticed at the last minute I had typed an extra i in quit. Of all words to misspell So I hit cancel and the posting disappeared, never to reemerge. I hope by posting again the orginal post isn't residing someplace so I have made identical posts. Top off my troubles for the day, I answered a very interesting posting which I completely misinterpreted due to not seeing clearly the most important word which was CHEW. I saw chew as CHOW and responded in kind. I am not going to post again for a very long time. My ego doesn't need it----wow! Here is the smoking history of a 55 year smoker--because I feel I more or less promised to write it
I really have nothing to add to the stories other long time smokers have related. They have told the smokers' tale much more vividly than I can tell it. I also have trouble remembering how it came about that I loved smoking from the start or what really, in the end, led me to quit I believe I started to smoke out of curiosity. I had been taught that it was vulgar for a woman to smoke. This was in the forties in a small town. When I affiliated as a student nurse in a large hospital in a city, I had my first cigarette. From then on cigarettes and I were inseparable. We went through life together, never apart for a day. I was a perfect slave. And so it continued until three weeks and three days ago. I have a very close and loving family who , for too long, have been deeply concerned about my smoking. I finally really made myself look at their concerned faces and listened to their concerned voices and I said to myself, "This is nuts! Why am I still doing this to people who love me?" And that is that. I would take back the years I caused them to worry but you can't live backwards. All I can do now is join them in our mutual delight that I have FINALLY quit. And it hasn't been that bad. Most amazingly it hasn't. Have been Helped a great deal by this forum.
A thought or two for unconvinced smokers.: Smoking makes your skin wrinkle very early on, especially around the mouth which causes lipstick to bleed.
Smoking helps bring early onset of brittle bones. Fractured hips, ribs,and spine are very, very painful.
Smoking is bad for your teeth. You will hate dentures. They may look good if you are lucky, but they will always feel foreign in your nouth. And you don't have to be old for the damage to be done.
I always knew that, but I let it happen anyway. However, on the positive side--after only three weeks or so of being nicotine and tar free, I walk with a springy step, I breathe easily and deeply, and I feel strong and able to tackle anythng. And I no longer grieve (often) for the loss of my treacherous little friends. Lilac 3weeks 3 days Quit 55 yr. smoker
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Hillbilly(Gold)
Hillbilly(Gold)

12:24 AM - Jul 30, 2002 #46

Lilac, it's okay. We're all family here and if you misspell a word we're going to overlook it. Just keep posting when you want to and especially when you need to.

We'll still love you even if you don't speel everything just rright. :-) The important thing is to keep your quit!!!

Dave
I have chosen not to smoke, nor chew nor go with the girls that do for 3 Months 1 Week 4 Days 11 Hours 34 Minutes 37 Seconds. Cigarettes not smoked: 3586. Money saved: $493.20.
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CdnpheonixGold
CdnpheonixGold

2:46 AM - Aug 15, 2002 #47

Hello all you Fabulous Forty yr+ Freedom Fighters!!!

I'm not one of you, but this is such a wonderful thread and soooo inspirational I thought it needed to come up! Maybe some newbies have stories to add!

YQS
C
3W 16h 11m 25s (-650 cigarettes)
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

2:00 AM - Sep 16, 2002 #48

Earlier, I read a post about "people of age" and while I'm not sure what it was about or it's origins, I do know one thing for sure...

It makes NO difference how old we are, how long we smoked, or what physical problems we might be suffering, there is nothing in the world as wonderful, especially for us "older quitters" than to have finally realized we can live our lives without nicotine. The hardest thing, I believe, for us "people of age" (thank you Lilac, I never thought I would love that term, but I do), is just getting started. We are fortunate, here at Freedom to have found Joel and to have the tools to teach us about our addiction. Once we begin utilizing those tools, and reading, and learning, and yes, communicating with others going through this with us, we realize that quitting is not the horrible, dreaded act that we thought it would be.

Some people, usually long time smokers afraid to try, will say that it is more difficult for older quitters to quit , but believe it or not, if you look back at these posts, it is not difficult to quit, It may be a little scary at first, but in actuality, the act of quitting has been a lot easier than most of us thought it would be. What a relief to finally be able to say "I quit"! There is absolutely no better, no more wonderful, no more exhilarating and certainly, no more self satisfying feeling anywhere in the whole world to know that we NEVER again have to take another puff.

My husband and I are both aging, grateful, and very happy ex smokers,

Linda
after 41 years of smoking, free for 2 years 9 months
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Tellmeemore Silver
Tellmeemore Silver

10:22 AM - Sep 25, 2002 #49

Back in 1952 I sneeked cigrette 's from my dad's drawer. so did my sister, we went to the show and sat in the balcony and puffed away, (it was ok at that time) well one day my Dad ask my mom what was happening to all his cigrettes.,they were going fast,he had a carton now there were only a few packs left, well my sister and I decided to confess not knowing what would happen to us, to our surpiise Dad said he was glad that we smoked his cigretts rather than takeing cigaretts from strangers because so much "dope"was being used. and someone might give us some without us knowing it. so he said if we must smoke he would buy them for uslittle did we know at that time what cigrettes did, Ive tried many times to quit but have never had a site like this to communacate with, it makes all the difference in quiting and smoking. I thank after alot of prayers god had a lot to do with me finding this site, the first day I quit I needed help and did'nt know where to go , so I used keyword stop smoke and guess what came up. I did'nt know this site even excisted . I ve had support before but not like this, it really does work, Iam proof, I havent smoken in 7 days and hardley no withdrawal at all. amazing.
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Dragonfly (bronzed)
Dragonfly (bronzed)

12:28 PM - Dec 07, 2002 #50

Hi, I am Stephanie and I am a smokaholic! I have been Nicotine free for: 2W 5D 14h. I have NOT smoked 274, for a savings of $41.13. Life Saved: 22h 50m.
My mother is also a smokaholic. She will be 70 years old in February, but she is quite the spring chicken. She has smoked for around 50 years. She does have a cough but tells me that the doctor listened to her chest and her lungs are "clear."

I have a terrible fear!!!!

My mother told me that she is afraid that if she quits smoking now, the tar will clear from her lungs, leaving them unprotected and all of those years of smoking will then take their toll. I know that is silly. However, my fear is that if she quits smoking now, then in the near future we will learn she has lung cancer and she will die very soon. I am only 35 and feel that I have stopped the smoking in time. But, 50 years of smoking must have done some serious damage to my mother's internal organs. It seems that a number of people I know have had family members quit smoking, only to find out they have cancer and die within a year. I know the literature all says it's never to late to quit. So.. Please give me a link to an article that will help me come to my senses. I think if I give her a little push, she could quit too (but I'm scared).

Thanks!
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Dragonfly (bronzed)
Dragonfly (bronzed)

12:34 PM - Dec 07, 2002 #51

OH, by the way...

To all of you Forty year plus fighters,
You should be proud!! It really is the best gift you could give yourself and your loved ones!!
Stephanie
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

12:48 PM - Dec 07, 2002 #52

for stephanie....


"I Can't Quit or I Won't Quit" by Joel
Last edited by GrumpyOMrsS (Gold) on 2:52 PM - Feb 25, 2009, edited 1 time in total.
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Dragonfly (bronzed)
Dragonfly (bronzed)

1:10 PM - Dec 07, 2002 #53

Thanks! Printed article for bedtime reading. (These days that's about 2 a.m.)
Stephanie
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janetd (GOLD)
janetd (GOLD)

5:13 AM - Dec 08, 2002 #54

Hi Stephanie! Can't you talk to your Mother about this? If she's not already sick, quitting smoking will be good for her. If she is already sick quitting smoking will improve her chances of getting better. I hope someone better equipped to respond to your questions and concerns comes along. There is no guarantee for any of us here that we won't discover that we have lung cancer down the road. But in the interim, we have found our lives to be more enjoyable free of the chains of smoking.

yqs, Janet
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Dragonfly (bronzed)
Dragonfly (bronzed)

3:11 PM - Dec 09, 2002 #55

Janet,
Thanks for your reply. I'm not sure how I will approach her yet, but I will. I hate to be one of those reformed nagging ex-smokers - but I think it is my responsibility to be. I have not yet reached the comfort zone myself but everyday is really easier. Especially the past two days. I think I will get her after the holidays when she is less stressed and I am further into my own quit.

Stephanie
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OBob Gold
OBob Gold

10:26 AM - Mar 27, 2003 #56

For Madge...


"It makes NO difference how old we are, how long we smoked, or what physical problems we might be suffering, there is nothing in the world as wonderful, especially for us "older quitters" than to have finally realized we can live our lives without nicotine. The hardest thing, I believe, for us "people of age" (thank you Lilac, I never thought I would love that term, but I do), is just getting started. We are fortunate, here at Freedom to have found Joel and to have the tools to teach us about our addiction. Once we begin utilizing those tools, and reading, and learning, and yes, communicating with others going through this with us, we realize that quitting is not the horrible, dreaded act that we thought it would be."
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Dionne (gold)
Dionne (gold)

10:32 PM - Oct 18, 2003 #57

"Forty Plus Linda?" That be my group! Before I forget and probably something all us ex-smokers know already, The only truly hard part of quitting is the time BEFORE the act. It is so scary thinking about being parted from our horrid stinking monkey on the back nicotine habit that we actually panic at the thought of not having it to rely on! Plain Fear! Which almost (I think) slides away soon into the quit as we start to get the notion (with a very tiny smirk) that we are actually doing the deed. We have made the committment of quitting. "The seeminly unmangeable act." "We're doing it ." And not only are we still alive, we're gaining something we didn't even know about. PRIDE. What a gift that was for me.
Linda I think it's an interesting thread to have some replies from over 40 years group. And what I would like the 'younger' bunch to know is that today at 62 I never realized I could feel so full of just plain- good- old- fashioned- happy- energy!
I have so much oxygen in my blood it gives me the opportunity to dash about my days doing what I want when I want. Which is exactly why I wanted to quit smoking. It was literally robbing me of how I wanted to live my life.

When we enter into a major change in our lives it can get lonely if it's too drastic for all around us, which is why this Freedom Family is so important to keep around us. When I've been away for too long it feels a bit lonelier in the world. And truth be told it's easy to forget the monkey is always lurking about searching for weaknesses. Remaining a working part of Freedom ensures our safety as plenty of you are there reminding all... NOT ONE PUFF!
I see the original thread is over two years old. Works for me today!

Yours as always, Sweet Smelling Dionne
3 years, 10 days
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Eileen D (GOLD)
Eileen D (GOLD)

10:48 PM - Oct 18, 2003 #58

Dionne, it works for me too---I quit after 41 years!!!

One year, five months, two weeks, three days, 6 hours, 13 minutes and 19 seconds. 16057 cigarettes not smoked, saving $2,408.67. Life saved: 7 weeks, 6 days, 18 hours, 5 minutes.
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dookiejane
dookiejane

10:57 AM - Dec 02, 2003 #59

Hi,
I'm glad Toast brought this up for me. I shoulda been here a week ago.
What an interesting thread... forty year plus fighters.
And some great messages too.
I smoked for 49 years and even though i knew what it was doing to me i kept on.
When i found this site and read what everyone had to say about how they quit i began to believe that it was possible for me to quit cold turkey. I had tried all the other ways.
One of the things i learned from here was that using NRT kept me in a constant state of withdrawal but in using nothing i was free of nicotine in 72 hours.
Also that a crave would last about 3 minutes, and...the crave will go away whether i smoked or not.
You've heard people say, "if i could go back in time and know what i know now?"
Well, If i could go back and know what i know now i would NEVER have smoked even the first cigarette.
Most of the health problems i have now was caused by smoking. if i had never smoked i would be in pretty good health at almost 61 years old.
Oh yes, by the way....cold turkey was the easiest so far.
dookiejane




I have been quit for 2 Weeks, 5 Days, 20 hours, 1 minute and 53 seconds (19 days). I have saved $98.17 by not smoking 595 cigarettes. I have saved 2 Days, 1 hour and 35 minutes of my life.

( more time to chase after the grand younguns)
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Dionne (gold)
Dionne (gold)

10:54 PM - Dec 25, 2003 #60

Our Dear Linda! I still love this post of yours. Not smoking has simply given me a new lease on life. At 62 today, Christmas Day 2003, I am planning on my morning run here in sunny PVMex. It would not be possible if I still smoke. I don't think life would be possible today if I still smoked. Certainly not the type of life I choose to live. Thanks again my friend.

Yours, Dionne Triple Gold
I saved this icon from one of your letters as it simply resonated with me so much that day, all days.
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Coolmare2green
Coolmare2green

2:44 AM - Dec 26, 2003 #61

Dionne, did you just say that today's your birthday? if so, HAPPY BIRTHDAY!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Love and life to you--
Mary
I have chosen not to smoke for 2 Months 3 Weeks 3 Days 12 Hours 9 Minutes 16 Seconds. Cigarettes not smoked: 855. Money saved: $196.66.
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TOM DPLN1 GOLD
TOM DPLN1 GOLD

3:13 AM - Mar 05, 2004 #62

HI LINDA,

I TOO HAVE THE DUBIOUS DISTINCTION OF BEING A 40 PLUS
YEAR SMOKER. AT THE AGE OF 58 I HAVE BEEN NICOTINE
FREE FOR OVER THREE MONTHS AND BEGINNING TO FEEL
BETTER. THE MOST NOTICABLE NOT HACKING MY GUTS UP
EVERY MORNING. ALWAYS BLAMED IT ON THE MINT FLAVOR
OF THE TOOTHPASTE. TALK ABOUT JUNKIE THINKING AND
DENIAL !!! WELL ALL I HAVE TO SAY IS IT'S NEVER TOO LATE
TO QUIT. ONE LAST POINT, DO NOT THINK YOU HAVE PLENTY
OF TIME TO QUIT, YOU MAY NOT BE AS LUCKY AS SOME OF US
LONG TERM ADDICTS. STOP NOW.

TOM 3 MONTHS FREE
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IrishLotus GOLD
IrishLotus GOLD

2:52 AM - Apr 27, 2004 #63

I'm bringing this one to the top for Jane...hopefully you will get the opportunity to add your story here. Oh, and thanks for writin' it in the first place Grumpy!

YQS~Lotus

580 days free and feelin fine!
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redislegirl
redislegirl

8:38 PM - Apr 27, 2004 #64

Well I guess I am a member of this club wether I like it or not. Forty years of addiction...it's hard to believe. When you talked about smoking being the "in" thing forty years ago you brought back a flood of memories.Everyone in my entire family smoked right down to my dear Grannie (who started late in life and never inhaled, but had the uncanny ability to smoke an intire cigarette down to the filter without flicking the ash once. To all our amazement, the ash would be the whole length of her cigarette!). At family gatherings there would be aunts, uncles, neices, nephews and cousins around the table and when the meal was over the whole gang would carry their cocktails and cigarettes into the living room. There everyone would settle down in front of the black and white TV and through a haze of blue smoke, we would all laugh at Dean Martin as he held his smoke in one hand and his martini in the other and slurred out jokes. Ahh... those were the days. It's no wonder we took up smoking in our teens, by then it was as natural as breathing in and out. But that was then and this is now and now is soooo much smarter. I won't go into a detailed list, but many of those family members died of smoking related illness, including my mother, whom I sat with untill she struggled for her last breath from lung cancer. I don't know what lies ahead for me, time will tell, but I do know that after forty years I have put them away forever. Thanks to Freedom and all the dedicated folks here I am finally free from a lifetime addiction. Neither my daughters nor my grandchildren have ever smoked. The cycle stops here!! I will never take another puff!

Pam 3wks 5dys 2hrs Free
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jennifer
jennifer

1:14 AM - Apr 28, 2004 #65

I am also a member of this club I smoked for 42 long years and I never quit I had 4 children and smoked through all my prenancies which is terrible I do not know what damage I have done to myself because the last couple of years before I quit I was smoking 50 a dayI am now feeling so much better even though I have put quite a bit of weight on I have made a promise to myself that as soon as I have been quit for a year I am going to start to watch my eating I know I will be able to loose weight if I can quit smoking I can quit eating.
I have watched a lot of my family die from smoking related problems and I really do not want to die of lung cancer or any other caner for that matter so all you young newbies out there it is doable if us olbies can do it you can so stick with it and Never Take Another Puff I ahve been nicotine free for 9 months 1 week 21 hours and sooooooo proud of myself
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