*Freedom's Fabulous Forty year plus fighters

Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 18:58

22 Mar 2001, 04:18 #21

In 1955, amongst other things, it was simply really cool to smoke. Especially growing up in the streets of Brooklyn, NY trying to be a big guy and accepted in the crowd at your local candy store. As one of Joel's writings said, everyone smoked - my parents, my family doctor, my friends, dentist, Elvis, everyone. Why worry? Ha!

Chet


I have Quit for: 1M 14h 16m 4s. I have NOT smoked 789 cigs, for a savings of $118.48. Life Saved: 2D 17h 45m.
Last edited by Chet Kast (Gold) on 09 Jul 2009, 03:21, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 20:34

23 Mar 2001, 08:07 #22

i started smoking at the age of 14 about 43 years ago. before many years went by i was smoking 3 1/2 packs a day. tried to quit many times thru the years all of them ending in failure. but now for the 1st time i have found hope here at freedom. thanks all. hugs, bonnie

Two weeks, 6 hours, 21 minutes and 21 seconds. 998 cigarettes not smoked, saving $112.33. Life saved: 3 days, 11 hours, 10 minutes.

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Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 23:20

30 Mar 2001, 15:17 #23

Smoked for 35 years, have been smoke -free for two weeks.
All the stories and anecdotes in this thread about smoking in the 50's, 60's and even 70's may sound incredible to us in this day and age. However, I lived in Europe (Belgium, Spain and Greece) for eight years up until two years ago and I can tell you doctors and nurses do smoke in some hospitals, smoking is permitted in doctors' waiting rooms, some movie theaters, libraries, etc. The smoking section at most restaurants is most of the restaurant (non-smokers are seated at the little corner table by the kitchen). Non-smoking signs at some airports are mainly for decorative purposes, since most smokers ignore them and most non-smokers usually wouldn't confront a smoker with such petty technicality (a sign). Funny thing is that even airport security personnel smoke inside some airports. Young teens can buy lose cigarettes almost anywhere. Joe Camel is really big (literally), and is seen in full 3D glory on tens of stratigically located billboards throughtout major cities. For the most part, the police is not familiar with penalties associated with smoking in non-smoking public places. Fact is that in some countries penalties are not enforced at all, or are not even on the books.
I hope you undersatnd that I'm not trying to critisize any country or anybody. Heck, when I lived there I loved it since I was a heavy smoker. I could smoke anywhere I wanted, anytime I wanted and I did.
Things are changing though. And some countries like England are even tougher with smokers than even here at home.
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

31 Mar 2001, 04:03 #24

I also sucked on those nasty sickerettes for over 40 years and for about 35 of those years knowing full well that there was serious health risks involved. I started smoking at about 15 to be one of the "cool" guys. Had to work hard at getting addicted (dizzyness, coughing etc.) but by golly I was not to be denied. By the time I was 16 I could inhale with the best of them and even blow smoke out my nostrils and I know that impressed everyone, particularly the girls. Could roll up a pack of Lucky"s in my t-shirt also, ala James Dean. Oh, I was just so "cool". As a pilot in Vietnam I can remember taking off my oxygen mask shutting off the the oxygen (always safety first) and having a sickerette. At about 30,000 ft., not only hard to light but hard to keep lit. **** like crazy and the fire nearly comes back in your mouth. As I look back that was really smart.....and now I think of my Grandparents who I just adored. Neither of them ever smoked but I would go in there and smoke like a chimney. Of course I was not alone, but I now know how that must have smelled to them. It was a dirty rotten stinky job and I'm glad it's over and now I have been smokeless in Dallas for: Six months, one day, 17 hours, 28 minutes and 27 seconds. 7309 cigarettes not smoked, saving $1,005.23. Life saved: 3 weeks, 4 days, 9 hours,
Last edited by Stan (Gold) on 09 Jul 2009, 03:21, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

31 Mar 2001, 06:01 #25

Stan, (fellow Texan) I know you didn't mean for it to be funny, but at 30,000 feet???!!! My cartoon mind just went wind with that mental picture!! You're much "cooler" now. In fact in today's jargon you'd be called "kewl", I think that's spelled right. Hugs, Mari
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

21 Apr 2001, 20:56 #26

I'm still hanging around ...
8 months
&
20 days
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

22 Apr 2001, 05:48 #27

Once upon a time in my youth prior to starting smoking I can remember watching other people smoke. Seemed everyone was doing it. Didn't know smokers lives were going up in smoke, didn't realize some of them would die from smoke related illnesses, didn't even know it was an addiction. Perhaps I had my head stuck in the sand, I just don't know. Even when I started hearing reports about smoking related diseases I can remember thinking, "well if smoking is that bad surely it will become illegal". Well, what can I say? Antonia. Robert it makes me happy to see you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

03 May 2001, 03:06 #28

HI ZEP, HOW DID YOU KNOW I WOULD BE DROPPING BY TODAY. AFTER SMOKING FOR 54 YEARS, I AM PROUD TO SAY THAT I HAVE BEEN SMOKE FREE FOR:Five months, four days, 8 minutes and 25 seconds. 6160 cigarettes not smoked, saving $774.82. Life saved: 3 weeks, 9 hours, 20 minutes.
Hal
Last edited by Hal(Gold) on 09 Jul 2009, 03:22, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 20:35

18 Jun 2001, 08:01 #29

Thanks for all the sharing. Rang a lot bells with me. James Dean? But ofcourse! It was just part of me, I never saw Frank Sinatra or Dean Martin without a cigarette, did you? Forty one years and enough is enough is enough! Three weeks and two days.
With Love,
Robert2
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

18 Jun 2001, 11:17 #30

Hey, ya know I didn't smoke for 40+ years - only 20 - but I know folks who did! My grandfather - the one who died from a series of debilitating strokes - smoked from childhood til he was in his 70s. He quit cold turkey after his first stroke. Lucky Strikes. Ha. I remember he had cartons all over - in the car, by his sofa, etc. He grew up raising tobacco, as did my mother, his daughter. I still remember the sweet, oily, tobacco-y smell of the curing barn on their farm ... His wife never smoked, but had suffered TB in the 30s and ended up dying from COPD. No doubt, 60 yrs of living w/a smoker didn't help. My mother smoked from teen years til her death at 60 from an aneurysm. She had a habit of making sure she had a pack stationed where ever she tended to sit a spell. It was her Silva Thins I first snuck, via the popular unsealing the bottom of the pack method. My dad smoked from teen years all the way thru his year and a half of terminal cancer, chemo, radiation and until his death at 49. I remember visiting him in the hospital after one or another exploratory surgery and finding him sitting in bed smoking. They had smoking & non-smoking hospital rooms back then. I remember the **** we raised when the same hospital made us start smoking outside. He smoked regular Camels, giving me my first puff at age 4, no doubt hoping to make me sick & make an impression. His mother died of lung cancer, but never smoked. Both his brothers died from cancer too, one lung, one skin. His father from a heart attack.

As a young child, I remember begging, pleading and lecturing my parents about smoking. I remember the long car rides with them smoking & me carsick. It seemed so obvious to me that they were killing themselves with the **** things. But at such a young age in understanding, little did I know about the power of addiction, even in the face of strong desire to quit. So, by the time I was 14 or so, my father still newly dead, and me feeling like I didn't do something or other enough to make him stop before it killed him, I decided I'd "show them." I know now that it wasn't my job to make him stop, wasn't my fault he died, but nothing like youth and the hormones of puberty to make the world seem so black & white. I started smoking when I was out with my friends. I told myself it was in part to have something to do while they were getting stoned, which I wasn't much for. I see now that I was doing it too in a desperate act to get attention, to get confirmation that this was wrong behavior, and also hoping someone would show they cared enough to beg me to stop. Man, teen years are hard, no?? Such a martyr. I could buy 2 packs for $1. What a grown up! I remember the day I finally told my mother I smoked (how did she not notice??), we ended up at the drug store buying me a carton. Her advice, and I quote: "You know the dangers." I look back now and see that my mother had lived so long with her addiction, her hopelessness with it, that she couldn't see anymore that I might not yet be so hopeless. My parents were of the generation where it was sophisticated to smoke - smokers made their own choices! You learned to hold your liquor and smoke. Alas ....

So anyway, sorry to ramble on. Thanks for being there! I'm not craving, just remembering ...
:) Melissa

3 Weeks 5 Days 9 Minutes 1 Second ago I decided to express how much I care about myself by putting down cigarettes. Since then, I have not smoked a potential 520 cigarettes, at a savings of $70.22.
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

18 Jun 2001, 12:36 #31

((((Melissa)))

what you just did was good....you got a heap of feelings off your chest and that has a way of working miracles.

don't let your children see you suffer the way you watched your parents and family suffer. they sound as if they are pretty much from the same generation I came from when smoking was considered the norm, not the exception. we smoked because we thought we liked it and and kept on doing it because we did not know how to stop. little did we know that we were addicts addicted to the deadliest substance there is, and like most people, we did not know how to break that addiction until we found Freedom and the wonderful information here. Knowledge is power and the more we know about our addiction and it's hold on us, the easier it is to defeat it.

keep on rambling sweetheart, and keep on healing!

hugs, Linda
1yr, 5+months
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

08 Sep 2001, 20:48 #32

This is the thread that hopefully makes our 30 to 40 year new quitters tell themselves that "knowledge," patience, attitude, and one nicotine free day at a time, may just be the keys to meeting a wonderful new you!
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

27 Oct 2001, 20:43 #33

From Wendy:
HI!!!!!!!!!!!
I had to respond to you as YES isn't it ridiculous,,the only DRUGS that are illegal are the semi-harmless ones,the only ones in the USA that are legal are the REAL KILLERS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
AS of May 11, 2001 I smoked gpc light 100s,they were cheaper ,generic....My 14 year old son told me GPC stands for GOVERNMENT CONTROL POPULATION!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
I TRULY BELIEVE THAT THERE IS SOME TRUTH IN THAT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

(Wendy, I reposted your post from the deleted spot at message 41 above so that I could delete a few hundred of the !!!!!!!!! If we string too many characters together without any spaces between them then it causes the entire page to widen and makes it so that all reading the thread have to use their scroll right or left bar to read each line. I've done it myself, it's no big deal, but I did want you to know why I'd moved your post. Hugs, John )
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

31 Dec 2001, 03:00 #34

Hi,
Just wanted to put in my two cents worth.
I was born into a family that smoked. I had 2 grandma's that dipped snuff instead of smoking.

I tried cigarettes on and off all my life. Started smoking full time at the age of 17. My mom and Dad both smoked, and it was just so cool, I was a rebel that didn't need a cause!! All the cool kids at school smoked!
Of course I married a man that smoked. He dropped over of a massive coronary 10 years ago due to his 5 pack a day addiction. I heard the doctors tell him years before, "You don't have time to taper off cigarettes, you have to quit today or you are a dead man".

I raised 2 children and of course they smoke. My daughter just quit a few months ago.

I feel as tho this addiction has taken so much from me, and after 38 years, I will not give it any more. I only wish I had done it years before.NEVER ANOTHER PUFF, NEVER!
So newbies and lurkers, you can do it!! I am living proof its doable and you will be so happy you did. Never take another puff!! Betty
FREE 1 month, 5 days, cigs not smoked 2005, $saved 150.38
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

02 Jan 2002, 07:45 #35

I loved this post, and just wanted to say thank you to everyone for sharing their experiences with me.

YQS, Janet

I have chosen not to smoke for 1 Month 2 Weeks 1 Day 11 Hours 1 Minute 48 Seconds. Cigarettes not smoked: 909. Money saved: $227.30.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

24 Jan 2002, 10:16 #36

Many of Freedom's 40+ Year Quitters Club Members have written wonderful entries in this thread and if you have never taken the time to go back though them, please do! Their tremendous number of years spent in bondage bred some pretty powerful insights!
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

12 Mar 2002, 20:49 #37

Be Sure and Read the Early Posts to This Thread!
First Previous Next Last
When viewing large threads like this one, which currently has over 50 messages posted to it, it's important to keep in mind that each page of the thread holds just 15 messages. When the 16th message is posted to any new thread, a new page is started. This thread has 4 different pages and after reading or scrolling to the bottom of each page you must turn the page 3 times in order to read all the member posts. The early posts following Linda's wonderful post are very inspiring! Pages are turned by using the following commands located at both the top and bottom of each thread page.
First Previous Next Last
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

31 Mar 2002, 01:42 #38

pssst.....a little birdie told me again that Freedom has lots of new and wonderful quitters, who like me, smoked for decades and began when smoking was the "in" thing. Please add your stories. Forty is an arbitrary number...but we would love to hear from those of you who began smoking when it was glamorized and was allowed everywhere including hospitals and doctors' offices.

Linda
after 41 years of smoking, 2 years, 3 months, free
Last edited by GrumpyOMrsS (Gold) on 11 Mar 2009, 23:22, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:24

31 Mar 2002, 13:53 #39

I started smoked on the sly at the age of 12, that was at least 2 sickarettes/day and started smoking full time at 18, am 52 now. Sickarettes were 25 cents/pack from the machines. I remember saying I was going to quit when they went to 35 cents. But being the true blue addict that I was I paid the 35 cents, then 75, and every increase til now! I have been smoke free 10 days,11 hrs,57 min. and very proud! I am one of those that have no ill-effects at present but what the future holds, time will tell. Here's to remaining smoke free and enjoyng it!DebD
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

01 Jun 2002, 22:36 #40

For Lil its never too late your quit sis mirigirl
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:07

01 Jun 2002, 23:13 #41

I too started smoking when it was so cool to do, and to this day that is my worst junkie thought. it's almost like I am not myself without the cig in my hand. I never realized how it controlled so much of my life.It was the first thing I did in the morning and the last thing at night. like all addicts I always said that I could quit whenever I wanted to and I still really believe that .All my other quits failed because my heart wasn't in it and I didn't want to quit. This time I made up my mind to do it and with the help of everyone at freedom I did it. I started smoking when I was 15 and I quit on May 1st 2002 ------- I turned 56 on May 13th 2002
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Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 23:20

06 Jun 2002, 22:57 #42

Congratulations on your quit! I just passed my one -year mark and am feeling so good! I know that you still have cigarette thoughts, but after a year, the only cigarette thoughts I have are that I am soo glad I quit. Hang in there and everyday will be better and you will be sooo very proud of yourself. Freedom is the key word here. Freedom is wonderful!
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

10 Jul 2002, 19:02 #43

With so many younger members still in their 20's arriving here at Freedom, it can be easy for them to use the fact that many longer term smokers, such as those who've posted to this wonderful thread, continued smoking and eventually broke free. It's true, no doubt about it but a tremendous price is paid for each year of bondage.
The damage, decay, and destruction inflicted upon the human by the 4,000+ chemicals present in each burning cigarette is gradual yet continuous. Although we can't see the carbon monoxide destroying the lining of every blood vessel in the human body nor nicotine causing the release of stored facts, it happens a bit more with each puff.
Yesterday Kris71780 posted about a study in which physicians found that "the broken legs of cigarette smokers took an average of 276 days to heal while the non-smokers' legs took 146 days." I found it hard to believe so I did my own search and apparently it's true.
http://www3.utsouthwestern.edu/library/ ... okbone.htm
That's 130 days difference in healing time. Why? Think about oxygen, blood supply and a vascoconstrictor called nicotine. Other studies show that vascular damage starts very early in a smoker's life. Circulatory disease kills far more smokers than lung cancer. How clogged are your young arteries?

Smoking and Circulation

Medical Implications of Smoking

I can't quit or I won't quit.
Last edited by John (Gold) on 11 Mar 2009, 23:21, edited 2 times in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

26 Jul 2002, 06:53 #44

For Lilac - you'll need to to use left and right controls at the top or bottom of the page to move back through the posts, as there are some wonderful stories by lots of fantastic graduates who have a few less years than 55 but not too many! Celebrate each day of freedom and healing as a full and complete victory all on its own! Today is doable!
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

29 Jul 2002, 23:56 #45

Well, crum, I posted my "story" this morning and then noticed at the last minute I had typed an extra i in quit. Of all words to misspell So I hit cancel and the posting disappeared, never to reemerge. I hope by posting again the orginal post isn't residing someplace so I have made identical posts. Top off my troubles for the day, I answered a very interesting posting which I completely misinterpreted due to not seeing clearly the most important word which was CHEW. I saw chew as CHOW and responded in kind. I am not going to post again for a very long time. My ego doesn't need it----wow! Here is the smoking history of a 55 year smoker--because I feel I more or less promised to write it
I really have nothing to add to the stories other long time smokers have related. They have told the smokers' tale much more vividly than I can tell it. I also have trouble remembering how it came about that I loved smoking from the start or what really, in the end, led me to quit I believe I started to smoke out of curiosity. I had been taught that it was vulgar for a woman to smoke. This was in the forties in a small town. When I affiliated as a student nurse in a large hospital in a city, I had my first cigarette. From then on cigarettes and I were inseparable. We went through life together, never apart for a day. I was a perfect slave. And so it continued until three weeks and three days ago. I have a very close and loving family who , for too long, have been deeply concerned about my smoking. I finally really made myself look at their concerned faces and listened to their concerned voices and I said to myself, "This is nuts! Why am I still doing this to people who love me?" And that is that. I would take back the years I caused them to worry but you can't live backwards. All I can do now is join them in our mutual delight that I have FINALLY quit. And it hasn't been that bad. Most amazingly it hasn't. Have been Helped a great deal by this forum.
A thought or two for unconvinced smokers.: Smoking makes your skin wrinkle very early on, especially around the mouth which causes lipstick to bleed.
Smoking helps bring early onset of brittle bones. Fractured hips, ribs,and spine are very, very painful.
Smoking is bad for your teeth. You will hate dentures. They may look good if you are lucky, but they will always feel foreign in your nouth. And you don't have to be old for the damage to be done.
I always knew that, but I let it happen anyway. However, on the positive side--after only three weeks or so of being nicotine and tar free, I walk with a springy step, I breathe easily and deeply, and I feel strong and able to tackle anythng. And I no longer grieve (often) for the loss of my treacherous little friends. Lilac 3weeks 3 days Quit 55 yr. smoker
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