John (Gold)
John (Gold)

January 24th, 2001, 5:27 am #11

Wow! Does this bring back childhood memories I'd forgotten all about being six years old walking a mile to the store with a note in my hand to buy my mom some smokes. I'd forgotten all about it! Thanks Linda! Thanks all! This is a wonderful thread that I hope every newbie reads.
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mirigirl (silver)
mirigirl (silver)

January 24th, 2001, 6:29 am #12

WOW! - I'M READIN, I'M READING.....YOU ARE ALL SUCH AN INSPIRATION TO ME........THANK GOD FOR YOUR EXPERIENCE, STRENGTH AND HOPE! AND SHARING...........
Maz
Three days, 9 hours, 34 minutes and 27 seconds. 84 cigarettes not smoked, saving $27.19. Life saved: 7 hours, 0 minutes.
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wexmer
wexmer

January 24th, 2001, 8:02 am #13

Great stories all of you. Me? 35 years of smoking, 5 short of 40 but a long time nevertheless. And I was a Health Nut! Studied macrobiotics and even was a live-in macrobiotic chef in Spain. Made darn sure I had my Camels with me in my suitcase on the way to Spain. Camel straights. Healthier you know. Not filled up with chemicals because there's no filter. That job lasted less than a year. Moved back to USA. Started rolling our own cigarettes to a)save money and b) smoke less. Well that didn't last long. And on and on and on and on. Been trying to quit pretty serioulsy since turning 40. Next month I turn 50. Finding this web site has made all the difference. My first cigarette was an Old Gold. Anybody remember them??? We use to steal our parents cigarettes. Untape the bottom of the pack, gently pulll out 1 or 2 and tape it back up. Smoking stories go on and on. I remember going thru the Garbage once for cigarette butts on a camping trip. Gross.
Quitting is tough. The addiction is VERY POWERFUL. REad, read, read, read. Everyday I find something to latch onto to be my daily afirmation. Thanks to Joel. My new favorite is "Cigarettes are a fantasy. But smoking is a miserable addiction"
DAY 23 - Alice
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Hal(Gold)
Hal(Gold)

January 31st, 2001, 5:55 am #14

Hi all. I have been smoking for almost 55 years. I started smoking at age 15 when smoking, as so many of you have said, was COOL. My wife and I live in the mountains in Nevada at 7400 feet. We have a three story house, with the kitchen on the second floor. When I used to bring the groceries up the stairs, especially after 2 or 3 trips, i was so winded I had to sit down for 5 minutes to catch my breath. Of course this was also a good occasion to light one up. My doctor said I had the beginnings of emphysema and of course to quit smoking. On the evening of November 28, 2000 I had a coughing fit that just wouldn't quit, and both lungs hurt.
I went downstairs and ground up the 5 remaining packages of cigarettes in the garbage disposal. Im surprised the garbage disposal did'nt throw up. lol. Anyway I haven't had another puff since that night. I am still having trouble with cravings, but I keep telling myself that No matter how bad I feel, smoking is NOT an option. I also have a problem in that my wife still smokes, and she is nine months older than I. She will turn 70 in March, and to smoke menthols is a double whammy I am told as supposedly the menthol crystallizes in the lungs. NOT ANOTHER PUFF, NEVER. 2M 2D 2h 1m 11s, 2523 not smoked, Savings of $315.42. LS 1W 1D 18h 15m
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improud (golder)
improud (golder)

February 14th, 2001, 4:33 am #15

Are we not the coolest!!!! INTO MY 6th week NIC free after 40 years.
Last edited by improud (golder) on July 8th, 2009, 2:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Triin (GOLD)
Triin (GOLD)

February 24th, 2001, 10:42 pm #16

Those are the kind of stories that help me best. I have this overwhelming fear that if i don't quit now I will never be able to do it. This fear is not irrational. If I don't quit now, I will end up 50yrs old and still smoking. I'm 21 now. It's the last time for me to quit. And I'm going to make it!!!

Once, I met my old friend whom I hadn't seen for 2 years. We were chatting and she asked if I was still smoking. I said "I should quit soon". She replied "yeah, yeah, I've heard that before". It was then when I realized how long I had been telling myself and others I have to quit, but nevertheless I hadn't done it! I started to hate myself because of smoking, and I still did it! I was so ashamed! Now I'm free, and my intention is to stay free for the rest of my life!

Triin

I have been Quit for: 5D 16h 41m 47s. I have NOT smoked 113, for a savings of $7.83. Life Saved: 9h 25m
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Patticake (Gold)
Patticake (Gold)

February 25th, 2001, 11:20 am #17

I guess after smoking for 40+ years I can relate to just about every reply I have seen here. I guess no matter how old you are stopping an addiction is difficult. But I want to tell the young people who are here for support this: Please stop now, don't let nicodemon become part of your history and your future. I kept telling myself I was going to quit, I kept asking myself when. Smoking is life threatening, smoking is expensive, smoking smells, no where will you find one positive thing about smoking. When I first started smoking I thought why not everyone else is doing it. My aunts, uncles, cousins, parents, friends, movie stars, total strangers on the streets, I thought it was the thing to do. I didn't have a clue it was addictive, and I don't think anyone ever warned me it was, and my family was in the medical profession. I can remember in the early 60's a new mother could smoke in her room in the maternity ward, you could buy cigarettes in the lobby of the hospital. Smoking was allowed in doctors waiting rooms. And if one thinks the cost of a pack of cigarettes is high just think about the cost to your body after long term smoking. I am being honest when I say this has been one of the most difficult steps I have made in my life, this has been hard and I don't ever want to go through this again. I have been smoke free for one month and one week today and I take it one day at a time.
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Tessa
Tessa

February 25th, 2001, 12:46 pm #18

I was an addicted everyday smoker at the age of 17, but had sneaked smokes with friends on occasion before that.... I will soon be
56, so cigerettes had been a part of my life for 38 years. The first pack I bought was 24cents and the other penny from the quarter
went for gum balls in the hope of covering the smell. Ash trays were as important as milk bottles and coffee cups in our house
and every Aunt,and Uncle and almost every visitor smoked.
Every event , Christenings, Weddings, Holidays,and Funerals(in the adult room) took place in a fog of smoke. It was just a way of
life , you just sort of grew into. I`m so glad to see it fading away from social events and becoming a social tabu . Sure is easier on the
non smokers, and really gives a little affirmation, to us ex smokers, who are trying hard to make the addiction a thing of the past.
I wish freedom had been a part of my life at least 25 yrs ago, but am grateful I found them when I did....... Tessa

I hope to be smoke free the next 40years !!!!
Two months, two weeks, three days, 11 hours, 9 minutes and 49 seconds. 1589 cigarettes not smoked, saving $238.39. Life saved: 5 days, 12 hours, 25 minutes.
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R b rt
R b rt

March 10th, 2001, 12:17 am #19

hey y'all, just caught this thread before signing off ...
I re-read it and figured I'd add my current day stats to the bottom of it to show "I AM STILL HANGING AROUND"
SMOKEFREE !!!
7MONTHS/8DAYS
you CAN do it !! !! !!
- robert -
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

March 22nd, 2001, 4:02 am #20

forty year plus smokers....add your story. how we wish we'd had the courage to quit many years ago. Maybe we can make the younger quitters understand why we did it so, so long. Really....what was our excuse?
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Chet Kast (Gold)
Chet Kast (Gold)

March 22nd, 2001, 4:18 am #21

In 1955, amongst other things, it was simply really cool to smoke. Especially growing up in the streets of Brooklyn, NY trying to be a big guy and accepted in the crowd at your local candy store. As one of Joel's writings said, everyone smoked - my parents, my family doctor, my friends, dentist, Elvis, everyone. Why worry? Ha!

Chet


I have Quit for: 1M 14h 16m 4s. I have NOT smoked 789 cigs, for a savings of $118.48. Life Saved: 2D 17h 45m.
Last edited by Chet Kast (Gold) on July 9th, 2009, 3:21 am, edited 1 time in total.
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bonnie123(silver)
bonnie123(silver)

March 23rd, 2001, 8:07 am #22

i started smoking at the age of 14 about 43 years ago. before many years went by i was smoking 3 1/2 packs a day. tried to quit many times thru the years all of them ending in failure. but now for the 1st time i have found hope here at freedom. thanks all. hugs, bonnie

Two weeks, 6 hours, 21 minutes and 21 seconds. 998 cigarettes not smoked, saving $112.33. Life saved: 3 days, 11 hours, 10 minutes.

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Chuckie
Chuckie

March 30th, 2001, 3:17 pm #23

Smoked for 35 years, have been smoke -free for two weeks.
All the stories and anecdotes in this thread about smoking in the 50's, 60's and even 70's may sound incredible to us in this day and age. However, I lived in Europe (Belgium, Spain and Greece) for eight years up until two years ago and I can tell you doctors and nurses do smoke in some hospitals, smoking is permitted in doctors' waiting rooms, some movie theaters, libraries, etc. The smoking section at most restaurants is most of the restaurant (non-smokers are seated at the little corner table by the kitchen). Non-smoking signs at some airports are mainly for decorative purposes, since most smokers ignore them and most non-smokers usually wouldn't confront a smoker with such petty technicality (a sign). Funny thing is that even airport security personnel smoke inside some airports. Young teens can buy lose cigarettes almost anywhere. Joe Camel is really big (literally), and is seen in full 3D glory on tens of stratigically located billboards throughtout major cities. For the most part, the police is not familiar with penalties associated with smoking in non-smoking public places. Fact is that in some countries penalties are not enforced at all, or are not even on the books.
I hope you undersatnd that I'm not trying to critisize any country or anybody. Heck, when I lived there I loved it since I was a heavy smoker. I could smoke anywhere I wanted, anytime I wanted and I did.
Things are changing though. And some countries like England are even tougher with smokers than even here at home.
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Stan (Gold)
Stan (Gold)

March 31st, 2001, 4:03 am #24

I also sucked on those nasty sickerettes for over 40 years and for about 35 of those years knowing full well that there was serious health risks involved. I started smoking at about 15 to be one of the "cool" guys. Had to work hard at getting addicted (dizzyness, coughing etc.) but by golly I was not to be denied. By the time I was 16 I could inhale with the best of them and even blow smoke out my nostrils and I know that impressed everyone, particularly the girls. Could roll up a pack of Lucky"s in my t-shirt also, ala James Dean. Oh, I was just so "cool". As a pilot in Vietnam I can remember taking off my oxygen mask shutting off the the oxygen (always safety first) and having a sickerette. At about 30,000 ft., not only hard to light but hard to keep lit. **** like crazy and the fire nearly comes back in your mouth. As I look back that was really smart.....and now I think of my Grandparents who I just adored. Neither of them ever smoked but I would go in there and smoke like a chimney. Of course I was not alone, but I now know how that must have smelled to them. It was a dirty rotten stinky job and I'm glad it's over and now I have been smokeless in Dallas for: Six months, one day, 17 hours, 28 minutes and 27 seconds. 7309 cigarettes not smoked, saving $1,005.23. Life saved: 3 weeks, 4 days, 9 hours,
Last edited by Stan (Gold) on July 9th, 2009, 3:21 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Mari (GOLD)
Mari (GOLD)

March 31st, 2001, 6:01 am #25

Stan, (fellow Texan) I know you didn't mean for it to be funny, but at 30,000 feet???!!! My cartoon mind just went wind with that mental picture!! You're much "cooler" now. In fact in today's jargon you'd be called "kewl", I think that's spelled right. Hugs, Mari
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R b rt
R b rt

April 21st, 2001, 8:56 pm #26

I'm still hanging around ...
8 months
&
20 days
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Patticake (Gold)
Patticake (Gold)

April 22nd, 2001, 5:48 am #27

Once upon a time in my youth prior to starting smoking I can remember watching other people smoke. Seemed everyone was doing it. Didn't know smokers lives were going up in smoke, didn't realize some of them would die from smoke related illnesses, didn't even know it was an addiction. Perhaps I had my head stuck in the sand, I just don't know. Even when I started hearing reports about smoking related diseases I can remember thinking, "well if smoking is that bad surely it will become illegal". Well, what can I say? Antonia. Robert it makes me happy to see you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Hal(Gold)
Hal(Gold)

May 3rd, 2001, 3:06 am #28

HI ZEP, HOW DID YOU KNOW I WOULD BE DROPPING BY TODAY. AFTER SMOKING FOR 54 YEARS, I AM PROUD TO SAY THAT I HAVE BEEN SMOKE FREE FOR:Five months, four days, 8 minutes and 25 seconds. 6160 cigarettes not smoked, saving $774.82. Life saved: 3 weeks, 9 hours, 20 minutes.
Hal
Last edited by Hal(Gold) on July 9th, 2009, 3:22 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Robert2(Bronze)
Robert2(Bronze)

June 18th, 2001, 8:01 am #29

Thanks for all the sharing. Rang a lot bells with me. James Dean? But ofcourse! It was just part of me, I never saw Frank Sinatra or Dean Martin without a cigarette, did you? Forty one years and enough is enough is enough! Three weeks and two days.
With Love,
Robert2
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Toast (GOLD )
Toast (GOLD )

June 18th, 2001, 11:17 am #30

Hey, ya know I didn't smoke for 40+ years - only 20 - but I know folks who did! My grandfather - the one who died from a series of debilitating strokes - smoked from childhood til he was in his 70s. He quit cold turkey after his first stroke. Lucky Strikes. Ha. I remember he had cartons all over - in the car, by his sofa, etc. He grew up raising tobacco, as did my mother, his daughter. I still remember the sweet, oily, tobacco-y smell of the curing barn on their farm ... His wife never smoked, but had suffered TB in the 30s and ended up dying from COPD. No doubt, 60 yrs of living w/a smoker didn't help. My mother smoked from teen years til her death at 60 from an aneurysm. She had a habit of making sure she had a pack stationed where ever she tended to sit a spell. It was her Silva Thins I first snuck, via the popular unsealing the bottom of the pack method. My dad smoked from teen years all the way thru his year and a half of terminal cancer, chemo, radiation and until his death at 49. I remember visiting him in the hospital after one or another exploratory surgery and finding him sitting in bed smoking. They had smoking & non-smoking hospital rooms back then. I remember the **** we raised when the same hospital made us start smoking outside. He smoked regular Camels, giving me my first puff at age 4, no doubt hoping to make me sick & make an impression. His mother died of lung cancer, but never smoked. Both his brothers died from cancer too, one lung, one skin. His father from a heart attack.

As a young child, I remember begging, pleading and lecturing my parents about smoking. I remember the long car rides with them smoking & me carsick. It seemed so obvious to me that they were killing themselves with the **** things. But at such a young age in understanding, little did I know about the power of addiction, even in the face of strong desire to quit. So, by the time I was 14 or so, my father still newly dead, and me feeling like I didn't do something or other enough to make him stop before it killed him, I decided I'd "show them." I know now that it wasn't my job to make him stop, wasn't my fault he died, but nothing like youth and the hormones of puberty to make the world seem so black & white. I started smoking when I was out with my friends. I told myself it was in part to have something to do while they were getting stoned, which I wasn't much for. I see now that I was doing it too in a desperate act to get attention, to get confirmation that this was wrong behavior, and also hoping someone would show they cared enough to beg me to stop. Man, teen years are hard, no?? Such a martyr. I could buy 2 packs for $1. What a grown up! I remember the day I finally told my mother I smoked (how did she not notice??), we ended up at the drug store buying me a carton. Her advice, and I quote: "You know the dangers." I look back now and see that my mother had lived so long with her addiction, her hopelessness with it, that she couldn't see anymore that I might not yet be so hopeless. My parents were of the generation where it was sophisticated to smoke - smokers made their own choices! You learned to hold your liquor and smoke. Alas ....

So anyway, sorry to ramble on. Thanks for being there! I'm not craving, just remembering ...
:) Melissa

3 Weeks 5 Days 9 Minutes 1 Second ago I decided to express how much I care about myself by putting down cigarettes. Since then, I have not smoked a potential 520 cigarettes, at a savings of $70.22.
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

June 18th, 2001, 12:36 pm #31

((((Melissa)))

what you just did was good....you got a heap of feelings off your chest and that has a way of working miracles.

don't let your children see you suffer the way you watched your parents and family suffer. they sound as if they are pretty much from the same generation I came from when smoking was considered the norm, not the exception. we smoked because we thought we liked it and and kept on doing it because we did not know how to stop. little did we know that we were addicts addicted to the deadliest substance there is, and like most people, we did not know how to break that addiction until we found Freedom and the wonderful information here. Knowledge is power and the more we know about our addiction and it's hold on us, the easier it is to defeat it.

keep on rambling sweetheart, and keep on healing!

hugs, Linda
1yr, 5+months
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

September 8th, 2001, 8:48 pm #32

This is the thread that hopefully makes our 30 to 40 year new quitters tell themselves that "knowledge," patience, attitude, and one nicotine free day at a time, may just be the keys to meeting a wonderful new you!
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

October 27th, 2001, 8:43 pm #33

From Wendy:
HI!!!!!!!!!!!
I had to respond to you as YES isn't it ridiculous,,the only DRUGS that are illegal are the semi-harmless ones,the only ones in the USA that are legal are the REAL KILLERS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
AS of May 11, 2001 I smoked gpc light 100s,they were cheaper ,generic....My 14 year old son told me GPC stands for GOVERNMENT CONTROL POPULATION!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
I TRULY BELIEVE THAT THERE IS SOME TRUTH IN THAT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

(Wendy, I reposted your post from the deleted spot at message 41 above so that I could delete a few hundred of the !!!!!!!!! If we string too many characters together without any spaces between them then it causes the entire page to widen and makes it so that all reading the thread have to use their scroll right or left bar to read each line. I've done it myself, it's no big deal, but I did want you to know why I'd moved your post. Hugs, John )
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SonKist501(GREEN x2)
SonKist501(GREEN x2)

December 31st, 2001, 3:00 am #34

Hi,
Just wanted to put in my two cents worth.
I was born into a family that smoked. I had 2 grandma's that dipped snuff instead of smoking.

I tried cigarettes on and off all my life. Started smoking full time at the age of 17. My mom and Dad both smoked, and it was just so cool, I was a rebel that didn't need a cause!! All the cool kids at school smoked!
Of course I married a man that smoked. He dropped over of a massive coronary 10 years ago due to his 5 pack a day addiction. I heard the doctors tell him years before, "You don't have time to taper off cigarettes, you have to quit today or you are a dead man".

I raised 2 children and of course they smoke. My daughter just quit a few months ago.

I feel as tho this addiction has taken so much from me, and after 38 years, I will not give it any more. I only wish I had done it years before.NEVER ANOTHER PUFF, NEVER!
So newbies and lurkers, you can do it!! I am living proof its doable and you will be so happy you did. Never take another puff!! Betty
FREE 1 month, 5 days, cigs not smoked 2005, $saved 150.38
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janetd (GOLD)
janetd (GOLD)

January 2nd, 2002, 7:45 am #35

I loved this post, and just wanted to say thank you to everyone for sharing their experiences with me.

YQS, Janet

I have chosen not to smoke for 1 Month 2 Weeks 1 Day 11 Hours 1 Minute 48 Seconds. Cigarettes not smoked: 909. Money saved: $227.30.
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