For people wondering if quitting is really worth the effort...

For people wondering if quitting is really worth the effort...

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

20 Nov 2004, 08:51 #1

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Noni 33
Bryan 34
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Kim 46

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Is Quitting Smoking a Fate Worse than Death?
People sitting in at smoking clinics are amazed at how resistant smokers are to giving up cigarettes. Even smokers will sit and listen to horror stories of other participants in sheer disbelief. Some smokers have had multiple heart attacks, circulatory conditions resulting in amputations, cancers, emphysema and a host of other disabling and deadly diseases. How in the world could these people have continued smoking after all that? Some of these smokers are fully aware that smoking is crippling and killing them, but continue to smoke anyway. A legitimate question asked by any sane smoker or nonsmoker is, "why?"

The answer to such a complex issue is really quite simple. The smoker often has cigarettes so tied into his lifestyle that he feels when he gives up smoking he will give up all activities associated with cigarettes. Considering these activities include almost everything he does from the time he awakes to the time he goes to sleep, life seems like it will not be worth living as an ex-smoker. The smoker is also afraid he will experience the painful withdrawal symptoms from not smoking as long as he deprives himself of cigarettes. Considering all this, quitting smoking creates a greater fear than dying from smoking.

If the smoker were correct in all his assumptions of what life as an ex-smoker were like, then maybe it would not be worth it to quit. But all these assumptions are wrong. There is life after smoking, and withdrawal does not last forever. Trying to convince the smoker of this, though, is quite an uphill battle. These beliefs are deeply ingrained and are conditioned from the false positive effects experienced from cigarettes.

The smoker often feels that he needs a cigarette in order to get out of bed in the morning. Typically, when he awakes he feels a slight headache, tired, irritable, depressed and disoriented. He is under the belief that all people awake feeling this way. He is fortunate though, because he has a way to stop these horrible feelings. He smokes a cigarette or two. Then he begins waking up and feels human again. Once he is awake, he feels he needs cigarettes to give him energy to make it through the day. When he is under stress and nervous, the cigarettes calm him down. Giving up this wonder drug seems ludicrous to him.

But if he quits smoking he will be pleasantly surprised to find out that he will feel better and be able to cope with life more efficiently than when he was a smoker. When he wakes up in the morning, he will feel tremendously better than when he awoke as a smoker. No longer will he drag out of bed feeling horrible. Now he will wake up feeling well rested and refreshed. In general, he will be calmer than when he smoked. Even when under stress, he normally will not experience the panic reactions he used to feel whenever his nicotine level fell below acceptable levels. The belief that cigarettes were needed for energy is one of the most deceptive of all. Almost any ex-smoker will attest that he has more strength, endurance, and energy than he ever did as a smoker. And the fear of prolonged withdrawal also had no merit, for withdrawal symptoms would peak within three days, and totally subside within two weeks.

If any smoker just gives himself the chance to really feel how nice not smoking is, he will no longer have the irrational fears which keeps him maintaining his deadly addiction. He will find life will become simpler, happier, cleaner, and most importantly healthier, than when he was a smoker. His only fear will now be in relapsing to smoking and all he has to do to prevent this is - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!
Last edited by Joel on 12 Feb 2017, 15:35, edited 1 time in total.
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Eric Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

21 Nov 2004, 00:57 #2

Good Morning Joel,
Thanks for the thread, it's something I and I'm sure most here can relate to.
When I was making my decision to quit, that was one of my biggest fears. Will I be able to enjoy things in my life (or my life for that matter) after I quit smoking.
One of my biggest pleasures is playing the guitar. It was also my biggest trigger. If I was playing my guitar, I was smoking. My friends used to joke to me when I went to play out at the clubs, that I better have my smokes or I won't be able to play. They were like my guitar battery or something.
So when I quit smoking, I didn't play my guitar for over a week. So one day I finally looked at it and decided that
A. I'll beat this huge trigger and move on or
B. My fear will be right and I won't be able to quit smoking unless I quit playing guitar.
Well (A) won hands down! I was even amazed how not a big deal it was.
All this time I had this big battle going in my head about this trigger and now that I was playing my guitar......nothing. I was just playing my guitar....no fits, no panic attacks, no so-called nicodemon screaming at me. It was just me and my guitar.
Now when I play my guitar, smoking a cigarette doesn't even cross my mind.
So is there life after smoking? YES THERE IS!!! There's more life, more time, more money(unless you've been spending crazy like me, LOL), more energy, more taste, more smell (not allways a good thing, LOL) etc.
The only thing there isn't more of is more days wondering if I'll be able to quit smoking one day.
Joel, I think I speak for everyone here, when I say THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR THE WORK YOU'VE DONE AND GIVING US ALL EDUCATION AS TO HELP US ALL IN QUITTING THIS DEADLY ADDICTION.
Without this site and the education I've gotten I don't know if I would still be smoke free this morning.
I'm 33 years old. I started smoking when I was 12. I've been nicotine free for about 4 1/2 months. That's the longest time since I started smoking that I have been nicotine free. That's both scary and wonderful to me.
Everyone have a great nicotine free day!! NTAP!!!

YQB,
ERIC

I have been quit for 4 Months, 1 Week, 6 Days, 8 hours, 55 minutes and 46 seconds (136 days). I have saved $767.08 by not smoking 4,091 cigarettes. I have saved 2 Weeks, 4 hours and 55 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 7/7/04
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

21 Nov 2004, 06:04 #3

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When I put up this string yesterday I had not yet seen the above image sent to John by Kim's sister Kelly. Somehow this picture really captures the essence of this string's title. It doesn't show clogged arteries, or blackened lungs, surgical scars, or side effects from chemotherapy. It quietly and eloquently highlights the ultimate loss that smoking causes to individuals, their families and their loved ones.
Smoking has the ability to make you lose everything you care about. It also has the additional ability to cause immeasurable losses for everyone who cares about you. Considering the message being delivered here by this photo, I hope it makes it perfectly clear to all who visit this string that quitting smoking is worth the effort, for it is an effort to save your health and your life--an effort that you will win if you permanently stick to your personal commitment to never take another puff!
Joel
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Roger (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

22 Jan 2006, 13:52 #5

Image It is really worth the effort!!!!!
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FishingRodLady
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:02

01 Sep 2006, 23:27 #6

For Can

Hang in there!

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Sharon

Free for 44 days after 30 years
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tcouch0
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 01:33

16 Jan 2007, 06:34 #7

Image The fear of quiting is worse than quiting.

Teresa - 31 days free after 23 years of smoking
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

14 Oct 2007, 02:53 #8

Lest any of us forget. (written back in February of 2004)

We have three real world examples currently happening to board members that really show what kind of bad days smoking is capable of causing. The side effects that people may go through from quitting are nothing compared to the side effects that can be caused by not quitting. The three stories unfolding below clarify this point. No one should ever think that quitting is "A fate worse than death". The best way to mimimize your risk of facing real pain and suffering is to remember to stay totally committed to the promise that you made to yourself when joining to never take another puff!

Joel

Stage 4, lung cancer interview

Quit for Life!!!

My Health

Lung Cancer report not good here

I have some sad news
Sadly, this one needs to be updated to include the following new string:

Loss of a Great Quitter

New additions to this repost:

The Real Cigarette Induced "Roller Coaster" Ride

Have you met Deborah? She's 38

Also from above:
Image
When I put up this string I had not yet seen the above image sent to John by Kim's sister Kelly. Somehow this picture really captures the essence of this string's title. It doesn't show clogged arteries, or blackened lungs, surgical scars, or side effects from chemotherapy. It quietly and eloquently highlights the ultimate loss that smoking causes to individuals, their families and their loved ones.
Smoking has the ability to make you lose everything you care about. It also has the additional ability to cause immeasurable losses for everyone who cares about you. Considering the message being delivered here by this photo, I hope it makes it perfectly clear to all who visit this string that quitting smoking is worth the effort, for it is an effort to save your health and your life--an effort that you will win if you permanently stick to your personal commitment to never take another puff!
Joel
Reply