Focus on Quitting for Just One Hour

kals2
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:00

14 Apr 2001, 19:55 #21

This post is GREAT! I knew it.....this message confirms it....I'm in the STINKIN THINKIN mode right now - but the reading has turned my journey and I am again - headed in the right direction. Thankyou. I am still an ex-smoker; and I STILL choose NOT TO TAKE ANOTHER PUFF - It's back to read, read, READ. I especially like the reinforcements you guys all give here. It is so darned easy to get on the pity pot and say "poor me" waaaaa, waaaaaa. Or - we can take the road less traveled - and make the journey - one minute, one hour, 1/2 day, 1 day, etc. ,etc. I choose to NOT SMOKE. Thanks again for the support. I will post more now...It's VERY VERY reinforceful to continued success (at least for me). Thanks again...an ex-smoker of 2 weeks, 2 days, 10 hours + ..Becky
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

18 Apr 2001, 19:44 #22

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Does it make any sense to be worried about tomorrow's breakfast when it's thirty minutes before time for dinner? Put your energy and concern into those things that you can control here and now! This next hour could be your easiest yet and totally comfortable or it might be the most challenging you've seen. Regardless, a crave only lasts a couple of minutes (look at a clock), the hour will end, and your awesome journey of healing down Freedom's Road will continue!
Last edited by John (Gold) on 13 Jul 2009, 01:44, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

26 Apr 2001, 18:41 #23

Be patient with your healing!
Your priceless gift to you is still doing its work.
Ahead are comfort, peace and calmness.
Be strong and remember why Freedom exists!
We're here for you!
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SunshineRay
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 18:59

30 Apr 2001, 08:26 #24

Glad this post was here. In 3rd day, some hours rougher than others. Was already worrying about someone coming over tomorrow that smokes ... Joels post helped me on that one. This post however, has helped me with teaching me (starting to) take small steps. I hour at a time. I've been sitting here projecting all the way to next week when my girlfriend (a big smoker) is coming down to stay with me for 3 or 4 days. So ... as this is my 3rd day, Cheryl, aka sunshineray, shall concern herself with this hour, of this day.

Tomorrow, however I shall log back in to get support for smoking friend (my minds turned that into smoking gun now!) coming over. Ask him not to smoke, or watch him smoke as Joel suggests. Will leave till tomorrow.

Thanks Zep re: lots of excuses built in already re: illnesses. I thought about that after logging off that nite as I had read the Relapse Policy ... and I thought, gee's I've always found excuses to start smoking again .... or anything I was addicted to and wanted for that matter ... but I also thought/became aware that I had written those in my post, and subconciously was already setting myself up with a load of excuses, and reasons for lack of willpower. Even as I write this, part of me is saying.... but you do have all those reasons, but they're aren't reasons they're still excuses. This is going to be a hard road to travel. I'm glad I'm not doing it alone.

sunshine
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

07 May 2001, 19:12 #25

Maybe Twenty Times Longer[/size]
than You're Used to Waiting![/size]

It can be argued that nicotine conditions smoking addicts to be more impatient when it comes to satisfying the onset of a crave than heroin makes its addicts who mainstream their drug via needles into their arms and legs. The nicotine addict only has to wait the 8 seconds that it takes for an inhaled puff of nicotine to be absorbed by the lungs, returned to the heart and then get pumped straight up into our brain where dopamine is released and that "aaah" replenishment feeling was sensed. The heroin addict who injects heroin into an arm or leg has grown accustomed to waiting at least 14 to 16 seconds while the the particular vein slowly returns the heroin to the addict's heart where it is then pumped over and though the lungs then back to the heart before being pumped up to the brain where dopamine is released and the aaah feeling is sensed.
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This simple blood flow fact doesn't make life any easier for either addict but I hope it does help make the point that we've all been conditioned to be extremely impatient when it comes to satisfying our addiction to nicotine. If we are going to be successful in achieving complete calmness and lasting comfort then we must learn a bit of crave patience. It's only 2 to 3 minutes but in relation to the 8 seconds that we've each been conditioned to wait before our crave was fully satisfied, those 2 to 3 crave minutes can feel like a lifetime. Look at a clock! Remember, every crave ends whether you feed it or not. Why not bring them to a permanent end!
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Last edited by John (Gold) on 13 Jul 2009, 01:49, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

18 May 2001, 03:54 #26

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Find joy in your healing, feel love for your quit!

And before you know it ...
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Last edited by John (Gold) on 13 Jul 2009, 01:52, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

02 Jul 2001, 03:42 #27

Another Hour! Wowsers!!
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Whether you're looking at actual physical withdrawal, psychological craves, or just "thoughts" about smoking, the hallmark of the first 72 hours of a quit are anxiety and irritability, both of which you have mastered for the past hour! Your junkie mind may tell you that you are not strong enough to break free or that you need to lash out at those around you, but you've heard that line and played that game before.

There are hundreds of millions of ex-users alive on earth today, all living in comfort, and you are as strong as the strongest! The only thing you lacked was "understanding" but not anymore : )) Just one hour, challenge and day at a time - we're with you in spirit! Celebrate each hour of victory and soon they'll add up a glorious day of healing - just one day at a time. B

reathe deep, hug hard, live long.

John (Zep) - Gold
Last edited by John (Gold) on 13 Jul 2009, 01:55, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

24 Jul 2001, 18:23 #28

If we don't stay 100% nicotine clean today then tomorrow doesn't matter. Yes, I'm two years into a wonderful quit, I live in total and complete comfort of mind without any want whatsoever, but still, like you, I'm just one puff of nicotine away from destroying it all. In my mind are three packs a day worth of once hard working nicotonic receptors that have fully adjusted to retired life. They have not tasted new nicotine since May 15, 1999, and they will not be awaken today!
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momof4
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:14

26 Jul 2001, 09:11 #29

That was a great read. I appreciate all the one on one support here. It sure has helped me get through this horrible day!! To Zep and Joel and my not so "grumpy" mentor...THANK YOU
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

09 Aug 2001, 22:08 #30

You know with every fiber of your being that you can quit for 60 minutes - just one hour! Yes, there may be a few challenging moments in the hour but there isn't a smoker on earth who can't do it!

If, early in your quit, you look ahead and continue to focus on not smoking "ever again" - FOREVER - you will probably fail!

Let the minutes and hours build into glory! Just fight today's battle! If you don't succeed for the next 60 minutes, success tomorrow won't matter one little bit!

It's like climbing a steep mountain and continuing to look down - it'll drive ya nuts and scare you to death! Just focus on the rock in front of you - that one hour rock! We can all do this!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Baby steps .... YQB Zep : )
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