Every Quit is Different.

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

04 Dec 2008, 20:13 #176

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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

10 Dec 2008, 23:48 #177

From above:
I have seen a few times lately where a member will write a comment that "ALL" people have "this" experience when quitting or after quitting. The experience written about varies; it may be a specific kind of withdrawal that happens when quitting or a certain kind of thought or crave that occurs long after the person has stopped. The bottom line though is it is never accurate to say "ALL" people experience anything specific when talking about smoking and/or quitting.

This thread is important to clarify that every quit is different.

From above:

No one reading here at Freedom should be getting the idea that there is some predestined number of days, weeks, months of years that that are going to be bad. The only day that we know will end up being bad is the day that you renege on your personal promise to yourself to never take another puff.

and

With many new members coming in at once, and even more lurking, it is common for people first quitting or those just thinking about quitting to look over our members experiences to help predict what they might experience now. But the truth is, you cannot predict an exact experience of what this quit may hold for you, not if you talk to thousands of people. You cannot even use your own past reactions as an absolute predictor of what this quit holds in store for you.

While we can't predict the exact symptoms you may or may not have, we can predict certain issues. We can predict that once you get through the first 72 hours, physical withdrawal symptoms will have peaked and will then really dissipate and eventually disappear all together. More importantly, we can predict that once you have gotten through whatever withdrawals may have occurred, you will never have to deal with them ever again as long as you learn this time to never take another puff!
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

17 Dec 2008, 11:26 #178

From above:

I have seen a few times lately where a member will write a comment that "ALL" people have "this" experience when quitting or after quitting. The experience written about varies; it may be a specific kind of withdrawal that happens when quitting or a certain kind of thought or crave that occurs long after the person has stopped. The bottom line though is it is never accurate to say "ALL" people experience anything specific when talking about smoking and/or quitting.

This thread is important to clarify that every quit is different.

From above:

No one reading here at Freedom should be getting the idea that there is some predestined number of days, weeks, months of years that that are going to be bad. The only day that we know will end up being bad is the day that you renege on your personal promise to yourself to never take another puff.

and

With many new members coming in at once, and even more lurking, it is common for people first quitting or those just thinking about quitting to look over our members experiences to help predict what they might experience now. But the truth is, you cannot predict an exact experience of what this quit may hold for you, not if you talk to thousands of people. You cannot even use your own past reactions as an absolute predictor of what this quit holds in store for you.

While we can't predict the exact symptoms you may or may not have, we can predict certain issues. We can predict that once you get through the first 72 hours, physical withdrawal symptoms will have peaked and will then really dissipate and eventually disappear all together. More importantly, we can predict that once you have gotten through whatever withdrawals may have occurred, you will never have to deal with them ever again as long as you learn this time to never take another puff!
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

17 Dec 2008, 16:49 #179

Even the same quit is different! People ask, "when do the craves stop"?

At least for me, there was no black and white cut off date. There came a time when I would go days, even weeks, without a crave, and then some "first time trigger" would come along and I'd find myself reaching for the imaginary pack of cigarettes in my shirt pocket. Pure reflex. A crave? I guess some people would call it that.

Quitting is such a dynamic process that it's really hard to make definitive statements, other than the fact that it seems to generally get better and easier and more comfortable as the months go by.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

26 Dec 2008, 11:01 #180

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