Every Quit is Different.

Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:02

17 Apr 2006, 17:03 #26

Every quit of mine has been different all my previous memorable 3 have been horrendous the first was total daily obsession for a month
the second was just total insanity and crazy decisions
the third was harrwing emotional pain for months
Thank God this time its just one day no puffing
The site has maintained my positive attitude and Knowing I cant come back here ever if I smoke has actually made me feel rally valued you are all taking my addiction very seriously
Thanks

I have been quit for 1 Month, 4 Days, 4 hours, 3 minutes and 35 seconds (35 days). I have saved £91.43 by not smoking 351 cigarettes. I have saved 1 Day, 5 hours and 15 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 13/03/2006 06:00
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

21 Jun 2006, 06:38 #27

Every quit is different, depending on various factors. For myself, one factor was maturity but the overriding factor was health. It was continue smoking and get sick or quit. Thus, the quitting was relatively easy. Relatively is the key word here. The pull was overwhelming as always but the reason for the quit was bigger. That is what made the difference this time. And, the support and the education received from this site.

Five Weeks this Thursday Nicotine Free after 42 long years. NTAP!!
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

17 Jul 2006, 00:30 #28

It makes no difference how long you've smoked or how many cigerettes you smoked a day. The message above is still the same....every quit is different. For some this quit has been difficult and for others, it has been relatively easy.

I encourage all new quitters to read, read, read the information at Freedom and Whyquit.com, for therein lies the answer to whether you have a difficult or easy quit. Attitude is also important when quitting. Do not think of quitting as an end, rather think as quitting as a beginning and you will see what I mean.

After smoking 41 years, I've been free for 6 and a half years and every day has been not only easy, but a joy. Besides my family, my quit is one of the dearest accomplishments in my life. My only regret is that I waited so long to quit for I have no knowledge of what damage I have done by doing so. But again, is makes no difference how long you smoked or how many cigerettes you smoked daily, quitting successfully is within every person who smokes reach. Its as simple as remembering your reasons for quitting and learning why is it you should never take another puff.

Linda
Gold X 6
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Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

16 Oct 2006, 04:40 #29

From above:
Easy or hard, quitting is worth it.

Once you have quit for even a few hours, you have invested some effort, time, and maybe even a little pain. Make this effort count for something.

As long as you hang in there now, all of this will have accomplished a goal. It got you off of cigarettes.

After that, to stay off, the make or break point simply translates to...Never Take Another Puff!

Joel
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:16

20 Nov 2006, 02:17 #30

Hi Linda:

It was so good to read your story about quitting smoking for six years. It has been 5 months and 29 days for me today, and I have to say each week has been easier and easier. I still know that I am a nicotene addict but some days I actually forget that I ever smoked. It doesn't consume my thoughts anymore. I still love reading from people like you that have been over 6 years. This makes me know that I just need to take one day at a time and when you are at 12 years, I will be at Six years. I smoked for 42 plus years so I can relate to you completely.


NTAP

Dianne
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

19 Dec 2006, 04:13 #31

I saw where a member wrote to another member that there will be rough patches in the future. There is no guarantee that a person will experience rough patches in the future. Such blanket statements can be totally misleading. As this post talks about, every quit is different. There are some people who simply quit one day and never look back and never really seem to experience any tough patches.

Also, people can really minimize the risk of future rough patches by keeping their reasons for first quitting and their reasons for why they still wish to stay off of smoking reinforced. The more accurately a person sees smoking in its true light the more resolute he or she will always stay in his or her commitment to never take another puff.

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

05 Feb 2007, 23:08 #32

It is possible that you won't have any major symptoms this time. I have had a lot of four pack a day smokers who smoked 40 plus years who toss them with minimal withdrawal. The reason they never tried to quit before is they witnessed people who smoked one fourth of what they did go thorough terrible side effects and figured, "If it did that to them, it will kill me." But when the time came, their quit was easy in comparison. You may find that this quit will be relatively easy. Stranger things have happened. But if it does, don't think this didn't mean you were addicted. The factor that really shows the addiction is not how hard or how easy it is to quit. What really shows the addiction is how universally easy it is to go back. One puff and the quit can go out the window.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

07 Aug 2007, 23:18 #33

I reacted to a member which had a question about her anger. I too experienced that anger issue after about the same period. But my wife who quit 2 months after me never had any problem with her temper/emotions.

Frits (8 months)
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

18 Sep 2007, 07:29 #34

Yes, this quit is probably different but ....
Although not at all unusual to see a quitter having what can be termed a "cake-walk" quit, don't lull yourself into minimizing your dependency or your accomplishment as there's absolutely no guarantee that, should you relapse, your next attempt would go the same. What is it that allows the conscious thinking mind to so calm and quiet the impulsive limbic mind that the objective of coming home is initially met with little or no resistence? What dreams could be so great or awakening so powerful that no smoking urge, crave, impulse or desire seems to grow bigger than a stiff breeze?
Drug addiction is about inventing lies to get our drug back. For us it's rationalizing, minimizing or engaging in blame transference to invent reason to smoking, chew or dip nicotine, to give the rational thinking mind justification for again surrendering to our chemically captive impulsive primitive mind. Don't let "easy" or "hard" be your mind's excuse to relapse.
Whether touched by serious challenge, your own inner dreams and desires or moved by stories such as Kim's, Bryan's, or Noni's, never forget that the true test of nicotine's power isn't in how hard it is to quit but how easy it is to relapse. Still just one guiding principle ... no nicotine today, Never Take Another Puff, Dip or Chew!
John x8
Last edited by John (Gold) on 07 Mar 2009, 18:01, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 04 Apr 2005, 07:00

13 Oct 2007, 03:41 #35

We need to take care not to make generalizations when replying to the posts of others, especially early in our quits. Every quit is different, every quitter is different and so is every trigger or situation. Quitting is not always difficult nor is it always easy. It is what it is.

Living nicotine free is a long term commitment to living one day at a time. While we can learn from the experiences of others we should not assume that everyone will react the same way to every situation or that we will recover at the same rate or that because a certain trigger or period of time was difficult for us it will be difficult for all.

Joseph
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

28 Jan 2008, 02:30 #36

Don't fall into the trap of comparing your progress with that of others. Your comfort will come as long as you never violate the Law of Addiction.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

03 Apr 2008, 23:11 #37

It is possible that you won't have any major symptoms this time. I have had a lot of four pack a day smokers who smoked 40 plus years who toss them with minimal withdrawal. The reason they never tried to quit before is they witnessed people who smoked one fourth of what they did go thorough terrible side effects and figured, "If it did that to them, it will kill me." But when the time came, their quit was easy in comparison.

You may find that this quit will be relatively easy. Stranger things have happened. But if it does, don't think this didn't mean you were addicted. The factor that really shows the addiction is not how hard or how easy it is to quit. What really shows the addiction is how universally easy it is to go back. One puff and the quit can go out the window.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

17 Dec 2008, 16:49 #38

Even the same quit is different! People ask, "when do the craves stop"?

At least for me, there was no black and white cut off date. There came a time when I would go days, even weeks, without a crave, and then some "first time trigger" would come along and I'd find myself reaching for the imaginary pack of cigarettes in my shirt pocket. Pure reflex. A crave? I guess some people would call it that.

Quitting is such a dynamic process that it's really hard to make definitive statements, other than the fact that it seems to generally get better and easier and more comfortable as the months go by.
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Joined: 13 Nov 2008, 14:04

04 Nov 2014, 23:15 #39

New video based on this thread:
Every quit is different






Video discusses how it is impossible to determine with any certainty what kind of withdrawals or problems a person may encounter when quitting because every quit is different.


Related videos:


Comparing quits with others


Amount smoked


The fear of failure


"If I relapse I'll smoke until it kills me"


Quitting is more doable than most people think


What is withdrawal really like?
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