Every Quit is Different.

GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

15 Mar 2004, 08:13 #21

I have seen quite a few newbies comparing quits and telling others what they have to look forward to in the coming days.

It is really important that our newbies understand that every person's quit is different. Some of us have had easy times and some difficult.

The best advice we can give all of you is to take each day as it comes. Do not look at what your quit will be in a year or even next week. Look at it now and learn. Have patience and take baby steps. Read everything you can read at Freedom because knowledge is the best tool in overcoming the feelings you are feeling now.

One thing is a constant though, and that is, eventually each and every one of us finds comfort and joy in our quits. Some find it sooner than others, but we are all guaranteed find our freedom as long as we never take another puff.

Linda
50 months
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

07 May 2004, 21:24 #22

I was just reading a post from a person who had quit two month ago and reflected back that quitting smoking wasn't that hard. I think in a way most people find quitting easier than they expected it would be. I say this because most people while still smoking think that quitting is going to be so hard that they will not be able to do it. Just by the meer fact that a person is able to pull off the quit, quitting is likely easier than they had anticipated.

Of course there are those people who worked with the false perception that they could quit any time they wanted because quitting smoking would be a breeze once they just made up their mind. These people are often underestimating the grip nicotine addiction can take on people. There are plenty of people who start out their smoking careers in this state of thinking but over time reality sets in. They then may realize that smoking is no longer a simple choice and finally recognize that they have lost control of their smoking. Then they often convert over to the feeling that quitting is just too hard and they end up sustaining the addiction.

Again, while every quit is different and while it may be harder for some people than they thought it would be and easier for others, it is important to note that it is possible for all smokers to quit. Once a person quits if he or she keeps his or her reasons reinforced for first having wanted to quit and now for wanting to stay smoke free, he or she will be able to stick to his or her commitment by simply always remembering to never take another puff!

Joel
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

19 Oct 2004, 05:38 #23

The number and intensity of effects noticed or felt during recovery varies from person to person, and even between each person's own cessation experiences. Many members at Freedom are surprised to find that they experience almost no symptoms at all while others are confronted with multiple symptoms.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

19 Jul 2005, 04:20 #24

No one reading here at Freedom should be getting the idea that there is some predestined number of days, weeks, months of years that that are going to be bad. The only day that we know will end up being bad is the day that you renege on your personal promise to yourself to never take another puff. Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

15 Sep 2005, 19:20 #25

While every quit is different and while it may be harder for some people than they thought it would be and easier for others, it is important to note that it is possible for all smokers to quit. Once a person quits if he or she keeps his or her reasons reinforced for first having wanted to quit and now for wanting to stay smoke free, he or she will be able to stick to his or her commitment by simply always remembering to never take another puff!
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chel
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:02

17 Apr 2006, 17:03 #26

Every quit of mine has been different all my previous memorable 3 have been horrendous the first was total daily obsession for a month
the second was just total insanity and crazy decisions
the third was harrwing emotional pain for months
Thank God this time its just one day no puffing
The site has maintained my positive attitude and Knowing I cant come back here ever if I smoke has actually made me feel rally valued you are all taking my addiction very seriously
Thanks

I have been quit for 1 Month, 4 Days, 4 hours, 3 minutes and 35 seconds (35 days). I have saved £91.43 by not smoking 351 cigarettes. I have saved 1 Day, 5 hours and 15 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 13/03/2006 06:00
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Flo Babe
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

21 Jun 2006, 06:38 #27

Every quit is different, depending on various factors. For myself, one factor was maturity but the overriding factor was health. It was continue smoking and get sick or quit. Thus, the quitting was relatively easy. Relatively is the key word here. The pull was overwhelming as always but the reason for the quit was bigger. That is what made the difference this time. And, the support and the education received from this site.

Five Weeks this Thursday Nicotine Free after 42 long years. NTAP!! Image
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

17 Jul 2006, 00:30 #28

It makes no difference how long you've smoked or how many cigerettes you smoked a day. The message above is still the same....every quit is different. For some this quit has been difficult and for others, it has been relatively easy.

I encourage all new quitters to read, read, read the information at Freedom and Whyquit.com, for therein lies the answer to whether you have a difficult or easy quit. Attitude is also important when quitting. Do not think of quitting as an end, rather think as quitting as a beginning and you will see what I mean.

After smoking 41 years, I've been free for 6 and a half years and every day has been not only easy, but a joy. Besides my family, my quit is one of the dearest accomplishments in my life. My only regret is that I waited so long to quit for I have no knowledge of what damage I have done by doing so. But again, is makes no difference how long you smoked or how many cigerettes you smoked daily, quitting successfully is within every person who smokes reach. Its as simple as remembering your reasons for quitting and learning why is it you should never take another puff.

Linda
Gold X 6
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Sal GOLD.ffn
Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

16 Oct 2006, 04:40 #29

From above:
Easy or hard, quitting is worth it.

Once you have quit for even a few hours, you have invested some effort, time, and maybe even a little pain. Make this effort count for something.

As long as you hang in there now, all of this will have accomplished a goal. It got you off of cigarettes.

After that, to stay off, the make or break point simply translates to...Never Take Another Puff!

Joel
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didihunt7
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:16

20 Nov 2006, 02:17 #30

Hi Linda:

It was so good to read your story about quitting smoking for six years. It has been 5 months and 29 days for me today, and I have to say each week has been easier and easier. I still know that I am a nicotene addict but some days I actually forget that I ever smoked. It doesn't consume my thoughts anymore. I still love reading from people like you that have been over 6 years. This makes me know that I just need to take one day at a time and when you are at 12 years, I will be at Six years. I smoked for 42 plus years so I can relate to you completely.


NTAP

Dianne
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