Every Quit is Different.

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

28 Nov 2001, 20:46 #11

Image Every quit is different--but this one will be the most different of all if this time you get the understanding of nicotine as an addiction. The way this one will be the most different is it is the one that can last a lifetime--as long as you accept that you don't want to go back to full fledged smoking again AND that one drag can cause that tragic occurence to happen. If you always accept these two premises, this quit will be your last quit as long as you always stay focused on your commitment to stay smoke free be sticking to your vow to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

04 Jan 2002, 09:24 #12

With many new members coming in at once, and even more lurking, it is common for people first quitting or those just thinking about quitting to look over our members experiences to help predict what they might experience now. But the truth is, you cannot predict an exact experience of what this quit may hold for you, not if you talk to thousands of people. You cannot even use your own past reactions as an absolute predictor of what this quit holds in store for you.

While we can't predict the exact symptoms you may or may not have, we can predict certain issues. We can predict that once you get through the first 72 hours, physical withdrawal symptoms will have peaked and will then really dissipate and eventually disappear all together. More importantly, we can predict that once you have gotten through whatever withdrawals may have occurred, you will never have to deal with them ever again as long as you learn this time to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

07 Mar 2002, 19:13 #13

Every quit is different. Also, every relapse is the same--at least they all happen for the same reason. The ex-smoker forgot the law of addiction and took a puff. So again, while the exact experiences that a person goes through when quitting is different, ranging from being as easy as putting them down and never really looking back and having what is described as a really easy time, to having constant thoughts for days and lingering internal debates that can last a while--the technique to keep the quit going is still the same in either extreme. It is simply remembering to never take another puff!
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

09 Mar 2002, 21:41 #14

Image I saw in one string where it was written that quitting is hard--just not as hard as most people thought it would be. Actually, there are some people who quit with great ease--experiencing no withdrawal and never looking back with any thoughts or desire. While this is not the norm these people do exist, and sometimes they were very heavy smokers who never even tried to quit because of how hard they thought it was going to be.

If you are having an easy time with almost no desires, don't be worried that one day it all of a sudden is going to turn bad on you. You may never get a desire for a cigarette again. There may be thoughts or memories that you used to smoke, but not a desire or longing. But even if this is the case, where the "want" becomes non-existent, still keep up your understanding of the addiction and that if you were to let your guard down and take a puff, it would be a relapse and you don't know if the next quit would be horrible and maybe even impossible. There are scores of people out there who quit smoking one day with relative ease, blew the quit with the feeling that if they actually go back, they would "just" quit again, and never are able to get off.

Whether this is easy or hard, staying off is possible and in fact guaranteed as long as you always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Roger (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

10 Mar 2002, 04:28 #15

Joel,

This is a great piece of writing. (for me anyway) I have read this over and over quite a few times and have knind of been struggling with this mentally. Ever since I began this quit I have had an easy time of things. I have attempted to quit many times in the past resulting in failure. I used every aid on the market. I tried every way except having someone lock me away for a month or so. One time I even thought about getting arrested and requesting solitary confinement for a couple months but realized inmates are addicted too. All of my quits resulted in the same. Relapse and failure. The very sad part of it all was I never made it 24 hours without having a ciagarette. I was that addicted. I do believe I am addicted and always will be. I know that will never change. Each failure sent my self esteem and confidence in myself (being able to overcome this nasty addiction) plumetting to depths I can't even begin to describe. That was hard for me to accept due to the fact I am a very positive person and actually very self confident in myself. The onset of this quit was no different. It lasted just about 12 hours before I succumbed to my addiction. And 6 or 7 hours of that was sleeping. This time something was different. I don't know why but I just resolved to the fact if I could onlymake it one day, 24 hours, just smoke free I would be home free for the rest of my life. I vowed to myself to accomplish what I never have done ever before. I also told myself at the end of this 24 hour period if I just had to have a cigarette I would go buy a carton and sit and smoke 2 or 3 at a time to make up for the ones I didn't get. On 31 Dec 2001 my quest began , just one second after the begining of a new day. The day before a brand new year. To be honest I never figured I would make it 24 hours. I had this pre conceived notion I would be climbing the walls, choking all my friends trying to get a smoke from them, banging my head on the floor etc etc. I actually was secretly looking forward to my failure so I could resume smoking my brains out and preserving my internal organs like a smoked fish.

To my surprise I made it 24 hours. My self confidence soared and I told myself, that wasn't so bad. From that day forward it has been easy for me and I just knew in my heart it would last forever. I read all of the struggles some Freedomites are having and I feel undeserving of my 2 month plus quit. I know this to be foolish but just the same the feelings are there. Of course I had my withdrawls. They lasted 3 days of cold sweats. I also had urges to smoke. They come and went as fast as they entered my mind. I called my mother, She had quit some 35 years earlier than I. She was a heavy smoker also. I asked her how it was for her. She told me she spent just 3 days drummming an eraser from a pencil on the dining room table ( I remember this) and it was all over. No more craves. I resolved to the fact I am possibly the same as her with this quit.

Since my quit I have been waiting for the ball to drop hard. In the back of my mind I am slowly resolving it may never do that. However, if it does and I get sudden urges I know I am far better prepared to hand and defeat them simply due to the fact of all the people here and all I have learned about myself and my addiction by coming to Freedom each and every day.

I still find it hard for me to accept I am deserving of this quit. This is primarily due to how I was brought up I think. It was always drummed into my head, nothing is easy and worth while at the same time. You have to fight hard for everything you achieve. I know this to not be true in this case because everyone is derseving of a healthier life. As I think back on 35 plus years of my addiction, the last 10 or so have been the most agonizing for me. I hated myself for continuing to allow this ememy to control me. Each and everytime I would lite up a cigarette I cussed myself out. I litterally smoked in mental anguish for the last 10-12 years. Possibly that time frame was my price to pay. I guess I should just quit trying to outguess and analyze my gift of Freedom and just progress with my journey as a smoke free individual. There will never be another puff of cigarette smoke enter my lungs forever.

I guess it is now a good time to thank all the dedicated managers here for doing a tremendous service to your fellow man by volunteering your knowledge and time here for so many people.

Roger, (A much better person today, than yesterday)

2 Months 1 Week 2 Days 12 Hours 25 Minutes 59 Seconds smoke free, moving on until forever.
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Juanjuanjuanjuanjuan200
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

10 Jul 2002, 09:41 #16

NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF.

That is so true for me...I am the national champion of frustrated quits and relapses.

Juan
1month and minutes
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

24 Aug 2002, 19:02 #17

Last edited by John (Gold) on 07 Mar 2009, 18:24, edited 1 time in total.
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OBob Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

22 Jan 2003, 07:34 #18

"On the alternate side, some people have an easy quit, go back with the attitude, "Oh well, if I have to, I'll just quit again." They may find the next quit horrendous, and possibly not be able to pull it off."
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Roger (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

31 May 2003, 12:59 #19

Image

Just as this thread reads is how it is. We witness many people quitting around the same time and experiencing different levels of comfort in their quits. Don't feel bador indifferent because you are not as comfortable or your quit hasn't progressed as fast as someone elses. Continue on with the belief and faith the comfort you seek & desire will actually find you as long you are patient and never take another puff.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

23 Oct 2003, 07:34 #20

No one should think that just because they have a specific physical or emotional response when he or she quit that others are going to experience the same reactions. It is possible other that others may get the same reaction, it is possible that other people will get no reaction or even the opposite of the specific reaction. The fact is that you don't know that if you were to have to quit again that you would get the same reaction next time. Next time might be much easier, next time might be worse. Next time might be impossible or too late. What's nice though is that you don't have to worry about next time as long as you always remember this time to never take another puff!

Joel
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