Every Quit is Different.

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

28 Nov 2001, 20:46 #11

Every quit is different--but this one will be the most different of all if this time you get the understanding of nicotine as an addiction. The way this one will be the most different is it is the one that can last a lifetime--as long as you accept that you don't want to go back to full fledged smoking again AND that one drag can cause that tragic occurence to happen. If you always accept these two premises, this quit will be your last quit as long as you always stay focused on your commitment to stay smoke free be sticking to your vow to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

04 Jan 2002, 09:24 #12

With many new members coming in at once, and even more lurking, it is common for people first quitting or those just thinking about quitting to look over our members experiences to help predict what they might experience now. But the truth is, you cannot predict an exact experience of what this quit may hold for you, not if you talk to thousands of people. You cannot even use your own past reactions as an absolute predictor of what this quit holds in store for you.

While we can't predict the exact symptoms you may or may not have, we can predict certain issues. We can predict that once you get through the first 72 hours, physical withdrawal symptoms will have peaked and will then really dissipate and eventually disappear all together. More importantly, we can predict that once you have gotten through whatever withdrawals may have occurred, you will never have to deal with them ever again as long as you learn this time to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

07 Mar 2002, 19:13 #13

Every quit is different. Also, every relapse is the same--at least they all happen for the same reason. The ex-smoker forgot the law of addiction and took a puff. So again, while the exact experiences that a person goes through when quitting is different, ranging from being as easy as putting them down and never really looking back and having what is described as a really easy time, to having constant thoughts for days and lingering internal debates that can last a while--the technique to keep the quit going is still the same in either extreme. It is simply remembering to never take another puff!
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

09 Mar 2002, 21:41 #14

I saw in one string where it was written that quitting is hard--just not as hard as most people thought it would be. Actually, there are some people who quit with great ease--experiencing no withdrawal and never looking back with any thoughts or desire. While this is not the norm these people do exist, and sometimes they were very heavy smokers who never even tried to quit because of how hard they thought it was going to be.

If you are having an easy time with almost no desires, don't be worried that one day it all of a sudden is going to turn bad on you. You may never get a desire for a cigarette again. There may be thoughts or memories that you used to smoke, but not a desire or longing. But even if this is the case, where the "want" becomes non-existent, still keep up your understanding of the addiction and that if you were to let your guard down and take a puff, it would be a relapse and you don't know if the next quit would be horrible and maybe even impossible. There are scores of people out there who quit smoking one day with relative ease, blew the quit with the feeling that if they actually go back, they would "just" quit again, and never are able to get off.

Whether this is easy or hard, staying off is possible and in fact guaranteed as long as you always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

10 Mar 2002, 04:28 #15

Joel,

This is a great piece of writing. (for me anyway) I have read this over and over quite a few times and have knind of been struggling with this mentally. Ever since I began this quit I have had an easy time of things. I have attempted to quit many times in the past resulting in failure. I used every aid on the market. I tried every way except having someone lock me away for a month or so. One time I even thought about getting arrested and requesting solitary confinement for a couple months but realized inmates are addicted too. All of my quits resulted in the same. Relapse and failure. The very sad part of it all was I never made it 24 hours without having a ciagarette. I was that addicted. I do believe I am addicted and always will be. I know that will never change. Each failure sent my self esteem and confidence in myself (being able to overcome this nasty addiction) plumetting to depths I can't even begin to describe. That was hard for me to accept due to the fact I am a very positive person and actually very self confident in myself. The onset of this quit was no different. It lasted just about 12 hours before I succumbed to my addiction. And 6 or 7 hours of that was sleeping. This time something was different. I don't know why but I just resolved to the fact if I could onlymake it one day, 24 hours, just smoke free I would be home free for the rest of my life. I vowed to myself to accomplish what I never have done ever before. I also told myself at the end of this 24 hour period if I just had to have a cigarette I would go buy a carton and sit and smoke 2 or 3 at a time to make up for the ones I didn't get. On 31 Dec 2001 my quest began , just one second after the begining of a new day. The day before a brand new year. To be honest I never figured I would make it 24 hours. I had this pre conceived notion I would be climbing the walls, choking all my friends trying to get a smoke from them, banging my head on the floor etc etc. I actually was secretly looking forward to my failure so I could resume smoking my brains out and preserving my internal organs like a smoked fish.

To my surprise I made it 24 hours. My self confidence soared and I told myself, that wasn't so bad. From that day forward it has been easy for me and I just knew in my heart it would last forever. I read all of the struggles some Freedomites are having and I feel undeserving of my 2 month plus quit. I know this to be foolish but just the same the feelings are there. Of course I had my withdrawls. They lasted 3 days of cold sweats. I also had urges to smoke. They come and went as fast as they entered my mind. I called my mother, She had quit some 35 years earlier than I. She was a heavy smoker also. I asked her how it was for her. She told me she spent just 3 days drummming an eraser from a pencil on the dining room table ( I remember this) and it was all over. No more craves. I resolved to the fact I am possibly the same as her with this quit.

Since my quit I have been waiting for the ball to drop hard. In the back of my mind I am slowly resolving it may never do that. However, if it does and I get sudden urges I know I am far better prepared to hand and defeat them simply due to the fact of all the people here and all I have learned about myself and my addiction by coming to Freedom each and every day.

I still find it hard for me to accept I am deserving of this quit. This is primarily due to how I was brought up I think. It was always drummed into my head, nothing is easy and worth while at the same time. You have to fight hard for everything you achieve. I know this to not be true in this case because everyone is derseving of a healthier life. As I think back on 35 plus years of my addiction, the last 10 or so have been the most agonizing for me. I hated myself for continuing to allow this ememy to control me. Each and everytime I would lite up a cigarette I cussed myself out. I litterally smoked in mental anguish for the last 10-12 years. Possibly that time frame was my price to pay. I guess I should just quit trying to outguess and analyze my gift of Freedom and just progress with my journey as a smoke free individual. There will never be another puff of cigarette smoke enter my lungs forever.

I guess it is now a good time to thank all the dedicated managers here for doing a tremendous service to your fellow man by volunteering your knowledge and time here for so many people.

Roger, (A much better person today, than yesterday)

2 Months 1 Week 2 Days 12 Hours 25 Minutes 59 Seconds smoke free, moving on until forever.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

10 Jul 2002, 09:41 #16

NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF.

That is so true for me...I am the national champion of frustrated quits and relapses.

Juan
1month and minutes
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

24 Aug 2002, 19:02 #17

Last edited by John (Gold) on 07 Mar 2009, 18:24, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

22 Jan 2003, 07:34 #18

"On the alternate side, some people have an easy quit, go back with the attitude, "Oh well, if I have to, I'll just quit again." They may find the next quit horrendous, and possibly not be able to pull it off."
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

31 May 2003, 12:59 #19


Just as this thread reads is how it is. We witness many people quitting around the same time and experiencing different levels of comfort in their quits. Don't feel bador indifferent because you are not as comfortable or your quit hasn't progressed as fast as someone elses. Continue on with the belief and faith the comfort you seek & desire will actually find you as long you are patient and never take another puff.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

23 Oct 2003, 07:34 #20

No one should think that just because they have a specific physical or emotional response when he or she quit that others are going to experience the same reactions. It is possible other that others may get the same reaction, it is possible that other people will get no reaction or even the opposite of the specific reaction. The fact is that you don't know that if you were to have to quit again that you would get the same reaction next time. Next time might be much easier, next time might be worse. Next time might be impossible or too late. What's nice though is that you don't have to worry about next time as long as you always remember this time to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

15 Mar 2004, 08:13 #21

I have seen quite a few newbies comparing quits and telling others what they have to look forward to in the coming days.

It is really important that our newbies understand that every person's quit is different. Some of us have had easy times and some difficult.

The best advice we can give all of you is to take each day as it comes. Do not look at what your quit will be in a year or even next week. Look at it now and learn. Have patience and take baby steps. Read everything you can read at Freedom because knowledge is the best tool in overcoming the feelings you are feeling now.

One thing is a constant though, and that is, eventually each and every one of us finds comfort and joy in our quits. Some find it sooner than others, but we are all guaranteed find our freedom as long as we never take another puff.

Linda
50 months
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

07 May 2004, 21:24 #22

I was just reading a post from a person who had quit two month ago and reflected back that quitting smoking wasn't that hard. I think in a way most people find quitting easier than they expected it would be. I say this because most people while still smoking think that quitting is going to be so hard that they will not be able to do it. Just by the meer fact that a person is able to pull off the quit, quitting is likely easier than they had anticipated.

Of course there are those people who worked with the false perception that they could quit any time they wanted because quitting smoking would be a breeze once they just made up their mind. These people are often underestimating the grip nicotine addiction can take on people. There are plenty of people who start out their smoking careers in this state of thinking but over time reality sets in. They then may realize that smoking is no longer a simple choice and finally recognize that they have lost control of their smoking. Then they often convert over to the feeling that quitting is just too hard and they end up sustaining the addiction.

Again, while every quit is different and while it may be harder for some people than they thought it would be and easier for others, it is important to note that it is possible for all smokers to quit. Once a person quits if he or she keeps his or her reasons reinforced for first having wanted to quit and now for wanting to stay smoke free, he or she will be able to stick to his or her commitment by simply always remembering to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

19 Oct 2004, 05:38 #23

The number and intensity of effects noticed or felt during recovery varies from person to person, and even between each person's own cessation experiences. Many members at Freedom are surprised to find that they experience almost no symptoms at all while others are confronted with multiple symptoms.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

19 Jul 2005, 04:20 #24

No one reading here at Freedom should be getting the idea that there is some predestined number of days, weeks, months of years that that are going to be bad. The only day that we know will end up being bad is the day that you renege on your personal promise to yourself to never take another puff. Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

15 Sep 2005, 19:20 #25

While every quit is different and while it may be harder for some people than they thought it would be and easier for others, it is important to note that it is possible for all smokers to quit. Once a person quits if he or she keeps his or her reasons reinforced for first having wanted to quit and now for wanting to stay smoke free, he or she will be able to stick to his or her commitment by simply always remembering to never take another puff!
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:02

17 Apr 2006, 17:03 #26

Every quit of mine has been different all my previous memorable 3 have been horrendous the first was total daily obsession for a month
the second was just total insanity and crazy decisions
the third was harrwing emotional pain for months
Thank God this time its just one day no puffing
The site has maintained my positive attitude and Knowing I cant come back here ever if I smoke has actually made me feel rally valued you are all taking my addiction very seriously
Thanks

I have been quit for 1 Month, 4 Days, 4 hours, 3 minutes and 35 seconds (35 days). I have saved £91.43 by not smoking 351 cigarettes. I have saved 1 Day, 5 hours and 15 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 13/03/2006 06:00
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

21 Jun 2006, 06:38 #27

Every quit is different, depending on various factors. For myself, one factor was maturity but the overriding factor was health. It was continue smoking and get sick or quit. Thus, the quitting was relatively easy. Relatively is the key word here. The pull was overwhelming as always but the reason for the quit was bigger. That is what made the difference this time. And, the support and the education received from this site.

Five Weeks this Thursday Nicotine Free after 42 long years. NTAP!!
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

17 Jul 2006, 00:30 #28

It makes no difference how long you've smoked or how many cigerettes you smoked a day. The message above is still the same....every quit is different. For some this quit has been difficult and for others, it has been relatively easy.

I encourage all new quitters to read, read, read the information at Freedom and Whyquit.com, for therein lies the answer to whether you have a difficult or easy quit. Attitude is also important when quitting. Do not think of quitting as an end, rather think as quitting as a beginning and you will see what I mean.

After smoking 41 years, I've been free for 6 and a half years and every day has been not only easy, but a joy. Besides my family, my quit is one of the dearest accomplishments in my life. My only regret is that I waited so long to quit for I have no knowledge of what damage I have done by doing so. But again, is makes no difference how long you smoked or how many cigerettes you smoked daily, quitting successfully is within every person who smokes reach. Its as simple as remembering your reasons for quitting and learning why is it you should never take another puff.

Linda
Gold X 6
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Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

16 Oct 2006, 04:40 #29

From above:
Easy or hard, quitting is worth it.

Once you have quit for even a few hours, you have invested some effort, time, and maybe even a little pain. Make this effort count for something.

As long as you hang in there now, all of this will have accomplished a goal. It got you off of cigarettes.

After that, to stay off, the make or break point simply translates to...Never Take Another Puff!

Joel
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:16

20 Nov 2006, 02:17 #30

Hi Linda:

It was so good to read your story about quitting smoking for six years. It has been 5 months and 29 days for me today, and I have to say each week has been easier and easier. I still know that I am a nicotene addict but some days I actually forget that I ever smoked. It doesn't consume my thoughts anymore. I still love reading from people like you that have been over 6 years. This makes me know that I just need to take one day at a time and when you are at 12 years, I will be at Six years. I smoked for 42 plus years so I can relate to you completely.


NTAP

Dianne
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

19 Dec 2006, 04:13 #31

I saw where a member wrote to another member that there will be rough patches in the future. There is no guarantee that a person will experience rough patches in the future. Such blanket statements can be totally misleading. As this post talks about, every quit is different. There are some people who simply quit one day and never look back and never really seem to experience any tough patches.

Also, people can really minimize the risk of future rough patches by keeping their reasons for first quitting and their reasons for why they still wish to stay off of smoking reinforced. The more accurately a person sees smoking in its true light the more resolute he or she will always stay in his or her commitment to never take another puff.

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

05 Feb 2007, 23:08 #32

It is possible that you won't have any major symptoms this time. I have had a lot of four pack a day smokers who smoked 40 plus years who toss them with minimal withdrawal. The reason they never tried to quit before is they witnessed people who smoked one fourth of what they did go thorough terrible side effects and figured, "If it did that to them, it will kill me." But when the time came, their quit was easy in comparison. You may find that this quit will be relatively easy. Stranger things have happened. But if it does, don't think this didn't mean you were addicted. The factor that really shows the addiction is not how hard or how easy it is to quit. What really shows the addiction is how universally easy it is to go back. One puff and the quit can go out the window.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

07 Aug 2007, 23:18 #33

I reacted to a member which had a question about her anger. I too experienced that anger issue after about the same period. But my wife who quit 2 months after me never had any problem with her temper/emotions.

Frits (8 months)
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

18 Sep 2007, 07:29 #34

Yes, this quit is probably different but ....
Although not at all unusual to see a quitter having what can be termed a "cake-walk" quit, don't lull yourself into minimizing your dependency or your accomplishment as there's absolutely no guarantee that, should you relapse, your next attempt would go the same. What is it that allows the conscious thinking mind to so calm and quiet the impulsive limbic mind that the objective of coming home is initially met with little or no resistence? What dreams could be so great or awakening so powerful that no smoking urge, crave, impulse or desire seems to grow bigger than a stiff breeze?
Drug addiction is about inventing lies to get our drug back. For us it's rationalizing, minimizing or engaging in blame transference to invent reason to smoking, chew or dip nicotine, to give the rational thinking mind justification for again surrendering to our chemically captive impulsive primitive mind. Don't let "easy" or "hard" be your mind's excuse to relapse.
Whether touched by serious challenge, your own inner dreams and desires or moved by stories such as Kim's, Bryan's, or Noni's, never forget that the true test of nicotine's power isn't in how hard it is to quit but how easy it is to relapse. Still just one guiding principle ... no nicotine today, Never Take Another Puff, Dip or Chew!
John x8
Last edited by John (Gold) on 07 Mar 2009, 18:01, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 04 Apr 2005, 07:00

13 Oct 2007, 03:41 #35

We need to take care not to make generalizations when replying to the posts of others, especially early in our quits. Every quit is different, every quitter is different and so is every trigger or situation. Quitting is not always difficult nor is it always easy. It is what it is.

Living nicotine free is a long term commitment to living one day at a time. While we can learn from the experiences of others we should not assume that everyone will react the same way to every situation or that we will recover at the same rate or that because a certain trigger or period of time was difficult for us it will be difficult for all.

Joseph
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