Emotional Loss Experienced from Quitting Smoking

The emotions that flow from nicotine cessation
John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

27 Jan 2002, 12:08 #11

From: Joel. Sent: 8/6/2000 8:56 AM
For all in the early days of their quits this one will explain a lot of the feelings. They are normal and they will pass. Just hang in long enough to get to the other side. Quitting often does involve some emotional turmoil but nothing compared to the emotional toll smoking can extract on you, your family, friends and other loved ones if cigarettes reach their ultimate goal...they will kill you!

Ride out these feeling and you will eventually look back at this time as one of the happiest or at least most important times of your life, the week you finally took control of your smoking.

Good luck everyone.

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

18 Apr 2002, 19:22 #12

I totally ran out of time and never got to address this issue last night. I like people to be as prepared as possible and this information is very important to minimize some of the fears that are normally experienced when these symptoms occur. It is crucial that people realize these early reactions are temporary, not what life is like as an ex-smoker--just what life is like for a smoker in the early stages of a quit. Once they get over the first few days, physical and psychological settle back to a more normalized state and will stay on that tract as long as the person always stays nicotine free by knowing to never take another puff!
Joel
Last edited by Joel on 10 Apr 2009, 05:48, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

26 Jul 2002, 09:24 #13

For Ruth Ann. Those cycling emotions, the ups and downs and all arounds. What made me feel good about your posts was your laughing spells. It sounds like a good sign. A long and intense relationship has ended and this article by Joel does a fantastic job of helping us better understand where we might find ourselves and why. You're doing great! Baby steps, just one day at a time! We're here if you need us. John : )
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

31 Jul 2002, 05:45 #14

Welcome to Freedom Beth W! We've been waiting on you! This journey of adjustment can bring tears, hope, anger, courage, frustration, a sense of awakening, fear of the unknown, a feeling of having more time, impatience, impatience and more impatience, healing beyond your imagination, reflection, brief periods of challenge, moments of wonderful realization, and in the end, a new deep and rich sense of calmness. It can have it all! If you don't like the quit weather just wait three minutes and you just might see it change! This is a fantastic journey of escape, renewal, and learning! The tears are just fine, and for the guys too! It's ok to cry and even better when they're happy tears! You're doing fantastic! Baby steps - just a few minutes at a time! John : )
Last edited by John (Gold) on 16 Mar 2009, 23:16, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

08 Aug 2002, 19:53 #15

The process described in this article applies to any emotional loss. I think it's important to realize that it doesn't apply only to the loss of a highly addictive chemical because adding nicotine relapse to any other emotional loss has the potential to deprive each of us of self-esteem. Why would we want to make our depression phase possibly worse than it already is? My healing and freedom are two of the best things about my life. I refuse to let go of either! Protecting my quit is protects both my body and mind. John
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

27 Oct 2002, 22:01 #16

The Emotional Journey

Denial - "Who am I kidding, I can't quit!" "My cigarettes are my friend!"

Anger - "It isn't easy and it isn't fun but I'm doing it!!!" "Get out of my way!" "No one seems to appreciate the tremendous sacrifice I'm making." "I've giving up my entire life here, and for what!!!"

Bargaining - "A little reward, just one little puff!" "I've earned it!" "I'm stronger than all those other quitters at Freedom!" "They won't know!" "Even if I do relapse, I think I can do it again!" "But I won't need to, I can handle one puff!" "I'm different!" "Anyway, I'm sure it can't be as addictive as they're all saying!" "They're just trying to scare me!"

Depression - "Looks like I'm going to make it but how can I possibly function without smoking nicotine?" "I don't feel like smoker and I'm no comfortable ex-smoker either." "I feel lost." "I feel so alone."

Acceptance - "Hey, this isn't so bad and great tasting coffee too!" "I sort of like all this extra time and the fresh air!" "Not a single crave yesterday!" "Amazing!"
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Christine9511
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 20:30

24 Jan 2003, 05:43 #17

Felt much better after reading this as I have felt depressed and irritable all day. I have had a constant argument inside my head with my junkie thinking all day , luckily I won !
I am NOT going to lose my quit. I have worked so hard for this and Im not going to throw it away. On reflection, I have had a couple of bad days this week, but tomorrow is another day , Im just taking it one day at a time, and no matter how bad it got today, I DIDNT SMOKE !!
Stll strutting my stats _

One week, four days, 6 hours, 0 minutes and 40 seconds. 337 cigarettes not smoked, saving £67.50. Life saved: 1 day, 4 hours, 5 minutes.
Poppy Image
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L z l
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

25 Feb 2003, 23:47 #18

What a just AWESOME article. I just finished reading it again for the 2nd time for a little bit of "I will not smoke today" reinforcement (not that I needed much lol, but I still like to read a little bit each morning..it makes me feel secure for the entire day), and you know what ? I think what this article is all about is one of the reasons for so many non-educated quitters lost quits. They don't understand these emotional changes, perhaps get stuck in anger, in which case they've got everyone begging them to smoke again...or the depression does them in and they just don't KNOW that these are normal phases that can be worked through. Everyday I think that it's too bad that Freedom can't become the Official Way to Quit Smoking for everyone. That this information isn't more out there and putting those NRT businesses (everytime I see a commercial for NRTs, it infuriates me with the utter LIES !) OUT of business. Yikes! I'm getting OT here, sorry. Image

That's just me. Enthusiastic, excited, hopeful and ultra passionate about just about everything. And that includes smoking out (no pun intended) liars and especially loving my quit.

Love & Light,
Lazuli Image
~ Quit Proud For 1 Month 6 Days 8 Hours 1 Minute 31 Seconds!
1120 Forlorn Gag-a-rettes
still sitting on the store shelves, unloved, unwanted & Definitely NOT smoked ! ~
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ComicForces GOLD
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:02

20 Mar 2003, 03:26 #19

Is it just me, or is this part of this misleading?

"Once you reach the stage of acceptance, you get a true perspective of what smoking was doing to you and what not smoking can do for you. Within two weeks the addiction is broken and, hopefully, the stages are successfully overcome and, finally, life goes on."

It sort of, to me, makes it sound like you will have gone thorugh all the emotions, from denial to acceptance, in 2 short weeks.

This is not necessarily the case….

For you Gold Members (or even Silver… Bronze….whatever…): How long did do you think it took you to work through each stage? I know each person's quit is different… But I was just curious….

I completely agree with the stages by the way - and I LOVE this piece of reading… It's very true.

CF

3 weeks, 5 days without a single puff
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ComicForces GOLD
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:02

20 Mar 2003, 03:33 #20

Just wanted to add one more thing (I seem to post and then remember something else I wanted to say)…. I did see in one of the "one day at a time" threads that that's where one day at a time comes in…in the stage before acceptance… you have to take things one day at a time…and maybe the next acceptance will come.

I LOVE THAT concept.



CF

3 weeks, 5 days without a single puff
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