Don't Get Discouraged!

Subconscious use cue extinguishment
JamieIsGoldNow
JamieIsGoldNow

March 23rd, 2005, 12:26 am #31

I'm really glad I saw this. I have the daily digests coming to my email, but I rarely look too closely. Lately, I've been having urges for a cigarette, and I really thought I'd be over them by now. I just want to point out to the folks that are still new in their quit that the urges may not stop coming, but mine, at least, barely last long enough for me to give voice to it. In fact, it's more like any other wicked thought that runs through my head - I just have to let it keep running. So there's the hope - the urges might still be there, but nothing at all like the CRAVINGS used to be.

Jamie

I have been quit for 11 Months, 2 Weeks, 4 Days, 22 hours, 20 minutes and 16 seconds (352 days). I have saved $3,088.13 by not smoking 17,646 cigarettes. I have saved 2 Months, 6 hours and 30 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 4/3/2004
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

June 7th, 2005, 2:04 am #32

Parker has penned a classic.
Thanks Gitte for again reintroducing us.

Don't get discouraged!

This is hard work, but it does get easier. All you have to do is keep reading here and you see that. Post after post after post reinforces the message that this is doable and desirable. There is real comfort on this journey and it is yours for the taking as long as you never take another puff.
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

October 10th, 2005, 12:12 am #33

For Billie.

This is hard work, but it does get easier. All you have to do is keep reading here and you see that. Post after post after post reinforces the message that this is doable and desirable. There is real comfort on this journey and it is yours for the taking as long as you never take another puff. - Parker
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on June 3rd, 2011, 10:27 am, edited 1 time in total.
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FreeBillie61
FreeBillie61

October 10th, 2005, 12:31 am #34

Thanks Parker.

Billie
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Mike851
Mike851

March 31st, 2006, 6:44 pm #35

Parker,

Bravo!!! Thank You, Sir!!

All the points you made went for me.

Kind regards,
Mike W...no nicotine since 13th Feb 2006
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

April 6th, 2006, 8:55 pm #36

From above:
The thoughts would only have power if I latched onto them.
If I grabbed that thought as it was flying by and captured it and began to stroke it and worry about it and magnify it and reproduce it and clutch it to me….then it would cease to be powerless.
It would grow in size and strength and take up more and more space in my brain.
I might begin to feel less grateful for my freedom and more like I was deprived of something. Then perhaps some feelings of resentment might arise. Maybe I might even begin to entertain the thought that this one puff leads to relapse business is a bunch of malarkey.
I imagine that more than one of you is nodding your head in recognition as you read this. We've all been there---this is junkie thinking. This is one of the long-term results of drug addiction.
Last edited by Sal GOLD.ffn on June 3rd, 2011, 10:28 am, edited 1 time in total.
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

June 6th, 2006, 10:16 pm #37

Parker's post seems doubly (quadruplely ? ) appropriate today.

The freedom and comfort that eventually come by living nicotine free, as we were meant to be, is worth any amount of struggle we go through to get to the other side.
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

July 7th, 2006, 4:03 am #38

from above ..........
Perhaps some people think that you quit smoking and now it's over. End of story. Close the book. File this away as an unfortunate incident of the past. You don't need to think about it anymore. Well, we do need to think about it - not obsessively, not continually - but it needs our attention. We need to remember how desperate we felt to quit. We need to remember how awful withdrawal might have been. We need to remember how we began to gradually feel better and could concentrate on something besides not smoking. We need to remember how we began to understand that years of smoking had stunted our emotional responses. We need to remember cutting ourselves off from other people in order to smoke. We need to remember that we quit smoking because we valued our lives and ourselves enough to take a frightening step into the unknown territory of recovery.

It's fine by me to get a little scared once in a while. Keeps me grateful for my quit. Reminds me of what a precious gift I am giving myself every day.

So, don't lose heart!

Don't get discouraged!

This is hard work, but it does get easier. All you have to do is keep reading here and you see that. Post after post after post reinforces the message that this is doable and desirable. There is real comfort on this journey and it is yours for the taking as long as you never take another puff.

(There I go stealing Joel's lines again!)

Parker (who is now over 4 years removed from active addiction)

and (as we all are) one puff away from many a day.

To add another wonderful Parker line -

"We are never cured of our addiction."
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SandraJ0 Gold1
SandraJ0 Gold1

September 2nd, 2006, 4:15 am #39

Seems no matter what I need I find it here.. This was perfect for today.
Sandy Freedom math 1 = all ..and.. none = freedom ..and..216 days free = 7 Months, 4 Days, 6 hours and 15 minutes which = $1,081.29 more dollars in my pocket and 4,325 cancer delivery sticks not smoked.and 2 Weeks, 1 Day and 25 minutes extra time to enjoy life. whoo hoo freedom feels great.
Last edited by SandraJ0 Gold1 on June 3rd, 2011, 10:29 am, edited 1 time in total.
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

October 3rd, 2006, 1:08 am #40

 For Jeanine. Don't get discouraged. Quitting isn't a problem it is a solution. Withdrawal anxiety and being uncomfortable making the necessary Adjustments: Dealing With Life Without the Drug (Parade) will not shorten your life and make living it less worthwhile - continuing to smoke tobacco will surely do so.

This is hard work, but it does get easier. All you have to do is keep reading here and you see that. Post after post after post reinforces the message that this is doable and desirable. There is real comfort on this journey and it is yours for the taking as long as you never take another puff. - Parker
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on June 3rd, 2011, 10:25 am, edited 1 time in total.
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dogmomgreenplus
dogmomgreenplus

October 4th, 2006, 3:08 am #41

Thanks, Joe. My quit is SAFE - I am committed. Discouragement is just one of my obstacles - I'll ride it through. What's nice is having a place like this where I can vent to others who understand. I really have no one else with whom I can share the ups and downs of this ride.

Thanks for caring ....
Jeanine
(12 days)
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DebRDance
DebRDance

October 4th, 2006, 11:03 am #42

I just read this post and I thank you SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO much. I have up days and down days and think what's wrong with me? When do I get to sit at the computer and not have a thought (fleeting or otherwise) about smoking? When do I get to be okay with my coffee at home? When do I get to think in terms of months or forevers in reference to not smoking instead of days or hours? I thank you for this post because you spoke volumes to me and I appreciate the fact that you are honest about it all...Thanks I needed that!

Debbie - Free and Healing for One Month, Twenty Days, 15 Hours and 42 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 3 Days and 12 Hours, by avoiding the use of 1013 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $228.42.
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

October 18th, 2006, 7:35 am #43

(from above ..........)

...Perhaps some people think that you quit smoking and now it's over. End of story. Close the book. File this away as an unfortunate incident of the past. You don't need to think about it anymore. Well, we do need to think about it - not obsessively, not continually - but it needs our attention. We need to remember how desperate we felt to quit. We need to remember how awful withdrawal might have been. We need to remember how we began to gradually feel better and could concentrate on something besides not smoking. We need to remember how we began to understand that years of smoking had stunted our emotional responses. We need to remember cutting ourselves off from other people in order to smoke. We need to remember that we quit smoking because we valued our lives and ourselves enough to take a frightening step into the unknown territory of recovery.

It's fine by me to get a little scared once in a while. Keeps me grateful for my quit. Reminds me of what a precious gift I am giving myself every day.

So, don't lose heart!

Don't get discouraged!

This is hard work, but it does get easier. All you have to do is keep reading here and you see that. Post after post after post reinforces the message that this is doable and desirable. There is real comfort on this journey and it is yours for the taking as long as you never take another puff.

(There I go stealing Joel's lines again!)

Parker - GOLD!
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megsfolly
megsfolly

November 6th, 2006, 2:16 am #44

Well today was a really bad day for the wanting!! After posting on my diary and being sent some reading - which I read, re read and then read again just in ncase I missed something!! I went for a brisk walk, I had a long bubbly bath and nothing helped.

I came accross this thread and it seems to have helped - I no longer feel that I am the only one having these thoughts. I will not get discouraged - I will never take another puff. I may be an addict but I'm in control!!

Thank you

Megan - Free and Healing for One Month, Three Days, 19 Hours and 15 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 4 Days and 20 Hours, by avoiding the use of 1392 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me £383.38.
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Julia Rose1
Julia Rose1

December 6th, 2006, 7:58 pm #45

This was just what I needed to read today, thanks.
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Roger (Gold)
Roger (Gold)

February 12th, 2007, 11:41 am #46

 A few of our members are wondering if they will ever feel the comfort that is promised because they feel different! Read below what our Parker had to say about that.




(from above ..........)

...Perhaps some people think that you quit smoking and now it's over. End of story. Close the book. File this away as an unfortunate incident of the past. You don't need to think about it anymore. Well, we do need to think about it - not obsessively, not continually - but it needs our attention. We need to remember how desperate we felt to quit. We need to remember how awful withdrawal might have been. We need to remember how we began to gradually feel better and could concentrate on something besides not smoking. We need to remember how we began to understand that years of smoking had stunted our emotional responses. We need to remember cutting ourselves off from other people in order to smoke. We need to remember that we quit smoking because we valued our lives and ourselves enough to take a frightening step into the unknown territory of recovery.

It's fine by me to get a little scared once in a while. Keeps me grateful for my quit. Reminds me of what a precious gift I am giving myself every day.

So, don't lose heart!

Don't get discouraged!

This is hard work, but it does get easier. All you have to do is keep reading here and you see that. Post after post after post reinforces the message that this is doable and desirable. There is real comfort on this journey and it is yours for the taking as long as you never take another puff.

(There I go stealing Joel's lines again!)

Parker - GOLD!
Last edited by Roger (Gold) on June 3rd, 2011, 10:27 am, edited 1 time in total.
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DynamicAsh1
DynamicAsh1

February 19th, 2007, 10:36 am #47

Thanks so much for your honesty, It is soo real

Take care of your quit and it will take care of you..
NTAP
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TonyKY2
TonyKY2

February 19th, 2007, 10:46 am #48

Thank you for this post. This is exactly what I needed right now. :)

I have been quit for 2 Weeks, 6 Days, 3 hours, 46 minutes and 36 seconds (20 days). I have saved $65.50 by not smoking 403 cigarettes. I have saved 1 Day, 9 hours and 35 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 1/29/2007 6:00 PM
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

September 18th, 2007, 2:16 am #49

For Chris Anne.

Don't get discouraged. Quitting isn't a problem it is a solution.
Withdrawal anxiety and being uncomfortable making the necessary Adjustments: Dealing With Life Without the Drug will not shorten your life and make living it less worthwhile - continuing to smoke tobacco will surely do so.

Thinking about the tobacco smoking nicotine induction activity is normal for a recovering person. Thoughts cannot hurt you. Taking action on those thoughts of wanting can and will hurt you. Actions speak louder than words - or thought

This is hard work, but it does get easier. All you have to do is keep reading here and you see that. Post after post after post reinforces the message that this is doable and desirable. There is real comfort on this journey and it is yours for the taking as long as you never take another puff. - Parker
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

October 30th, 2007, 11:27 am #50

This is a very good example of the riches you will find in the back pages of some of these older discussion strings. Go ahead, explore by utilizing the navigation controls at the top and bottom of each thread. You just might find the 'key' thought that makes the difference for you. Education is our key along with a belief that what those who have already trod this road have recorded with thousands of posts tell true - each day is in some way better than the last as long as we keep our personal pledge to never take another puff. - Joe J Freeee
From: Alyson-GOLD Sent: 9/15/2003 12:34 PM
Recovery is a lifelong journey. Recent months have kept me so busy that I haven't had time for posting but I do read at Freedom at least every couple of days. I return so that I'll always appreciate my journey and acknowledge all of its aspects.

Once in a great while a smoking thought will pass through my brain. I appreciate the reminder that as a smoker, I was not the master of my own time, my own activities, my own life - I was so much at the mercy of my addiction that AT NEARLY 15 MONTHS CLEAN, the siren can still sing out. It's a potent reinforcement of the fact that nicotine cravings ruled me for twenty years. I am forced to remember how I responded immediately, a slave to my drug, over and over, all day long, every day. I was a gerbil on a wheel.

Now, I'm gratefully back in charge and life on this side of the bars is so much better in so many ways. So, when a brief thought visits me, I accept it as evidence that I have been permanently altered and proof that I can never take another puff. I remember how nicotine was integrated at every level of my conscious and subconscious life like a parasite and take the opportunity to celebrate reclaiming my birthright to exist free. I walk on and walk tall.

I never have to smoke again.
What a relief.
What a joy!
YQS,
Alyson
14+ months (and 4 years and a month or so)
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Doc460704
Doc460704

January 31st, 2008, 12:24 am #51

Dear JoeJFree, Parker and all the GOLD members,

Thanks for the advice on this thread. As a newbee a few days short of green this was just what I needed. Especially the post from Parker.

I'm learning to care for my quit like I did for our kids when they were young. My baby is not quite a month old. I'm having some rough times, though fewer every day like you predicted. Comments from the experienced ones like you lead me to believe that just like my kids:

1) My quit needs more attention when it's this young.
2) My quit will mature and grow in strength like my children did.
3) Before I know it my quit will survive with little attention from me and I'll be able to look back with pride at the accomplishment.

Thanks & NTAP,

Pat (free 29 days, 9 hours and 19 minutes)
SLC, UT
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

June 22nd, 2008, 9:14 am #52

From Parker's wonderful post above:
Perhaps some people think that you quit smoking and now it's over. End of story. Close the book. File this away as an unfortunate incident of the past. You don't need to think about it anymore. Well, we do need to think about it - not obsessively, not continually - but it needs our attention. We need to remember how desperate we felt to quit. We need to remember how awful withdrawal might have been. We need to remember how we began to gradually feel better and could concentrate on something besides not smoking. We need to remember how we began to understand that years of smoking had stunted our emotional responses. We need to remember cutting ourselves off from other people in order to smoke. We need to remember that we quit smoking because we valued our lives and ourselves enough to take a frightening step into the unknown territory of recovery.

It's fine by me to get a little scared once in a while. Keeps me grateful for my quit. Reminds me of what a precious gift I am giving myself every day.

So, don't lose heart!

Don't get discouraged!

This is hard work, but it does get easier. All you have to do is keep reading here and you see that. Post after post after post reinforces the message that this is doable and desirable. There is real comfort on this journey and it is yours for the taking as long as you never take another puff.

(There I go stealing Joel's lines again!)
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eriley1
eriley1

June 22nd, 2008, 9:38 am #53

I have been needing every word of this post tonight and the last few days. I am ok...but seemingly thinking about nicotine too much. I had several weeks of nothing and now it seems a little more difficult. But I am resolved in my quit....just nice to see that when I quit it's never the end of story, close the book, file this away....it's always about NTAP, and that I can do. thanks for the post, jenna, free for 41 days
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candle61
candle61

June 22nd, 2008, 10:39 pm #54

Jenna, please don't get discouraged! I have toughts about nicotine I don't try to evade them but I don't over emphasize them . Just let them come and go. They are nothing but thoughts.You can even examine them in a kind os dispassionate way. Cigarettes, tobacco, nicotine this is bad all through. Your life is not bad.It's a good one, breathing is good. And the only way you can really breath is without nicotine. Keep to your resolve OK? candle
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Crystal View1.ffn
Crystal View1.ffn

June 29th, 2008, 9:51 am #55

Parker, I just got back from a full week at the beach with all my children and grandchildren (12 people in total!) ....staying in the same cottage...Got this post highlighted in an email....I want to say, thank you so, so much for your wisdom and honest "the way it is" sharing! "Initially, we need to work hard at our quits. Then comes a time when we realize the work is not as hard. We are able to ease up, we think less about it. But, we never get to forget that we are addicts in recovery. Nobody graduates from addiction." I will hold everything in these thoughts dear to my heart. Yes, I am free and "not afraid" (with all the tools you mention!) to stay that way! Thanks!!!! Katie

Katie - After 40 Years! Free and Healing for Three Years, Eight Months, Ten Days, 12 Hours and 45 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 79 Days and 17 Hours, by avoiding the use of 22959 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $4,856.36.
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