Does anyone else miss cigarette breaks?

Retraining the conscious mind

Does anyone else miss cigarette breaks?

Joined: 13 Jun 2009, 05:08

16 Jun 2009, 20:33 #1

I mean, the chance to get away from it all for 5 minutes, to have to "be right back" in order to separate then from now, to get a few minutes of peace and quiet? I think maybe that's the hardest part for me at this point. I try just going out back to sit on the bench while at work or out to my porchswing in the evenings, but the craves - well they still knock me off my feet. I seem to have to face the same triggers several times - and some aren't going away. I mean, how pathetic that just last night (after 19 days) I can't sit on my back porch and not smoke without tears coming to my eyes? What a junkie...

Meg
20 days and still pathetic
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Joined: 18 Jan 2009, 06:57

17 Jun 2009, 02:28 #2

We made em as often as we could so we would not feel the anxiety and pangs of the onset of withdrawal. Now, free of the physical grab of nicotine we can actually take a break when we need it, not simply when we made an excuse to intake more nicotine to delay full withdrawal another dose longer - 30 to 45 minutes at best.
Here, as always, Joel and a lot of other really smart and insightful members too have written good way of explaining this type of junkie justification:
Smoking Breaks
Last edited by Joe J free on 17 Jun 2009, 02:39, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 11 Nov 2008, 19:22

17 Jun 2009, 03:35 #3


You're not "pathetic," Meg, but a true drug addict in recovery. As for enduring the same triggers more than once, it's possible but also possible that we're seeing slightly different versions of somewhat similar triggers (that the conscious mind can't distinguish) or even us allowing conscious fixation to build into an emotional frenzy.

As Joe J points out, we can say our break was a chance to "get away for five minutes" or to have a few minutes of piece and quiet but in truth we were drug addicts and that's what all drug addicts do, take time to feed their addiction. Unless permitted to smoke nicotine indoors our only alternative to the breaks was the onset of early withdrawal.

If it truly is the breaks you miss then you're now more free than ever as now you can inhale fresh air or, as Joe J points out, engage in any activity you desire. In fact, if we smoked a pack of nicotine a day and spent an average of 5 minutes administering each fix, we now have an extra 700 minutes per week to do whatever our heart desires. That's over 11 hours of not inhaling a hot mini-toxic waste dump. Talk about a break
We can continue to cling to our old nicotine use rationalizations or bathe each in honest light. Still just one rule ... none today! Be proud of you, Meg, you've come far!

Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,

John (Gold x10)
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Joined: 03 Mar 2009, 15:23

17 Jun 2009, 15:06 #4

Meg, thank you for this post! I really appreciate it. I hope you are feeling better. Here is a link to the post that made my craves bearable.

Embrace your crave
It has been 109 days 12 hours and 29 minutes since I arrested nicotine addiction. Refusing to inhale the exhaust from 2190 burning tobacco sticks has saved me $438.08 and added 16 days 17 hours and 34 minutes to my life!
Never Take Another Puff
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Joined: 13 Jun 2009, 05:08

17 Jun 2009, 18:00 #5

I have found a thread called Turning the Corner... Acceptance. AWESOME! I'm not sure I'm there yet, but it had me face the fact that I need to get back to One Day at a Time until I am ready to accept the forever part of this journey. I actually have a sticky on my computer right next to the "I WILL NOT SMOKE TODAY" one that reads "TOMORROW MAY BRING ACCEPTANCE." Remember: baby steps! Plus on that same thread I read a bunch of <older> posts from almost green to newly green quitters that seem to be having as hard a time as I am. You are absolutely right, john, about the emotional frenzy. That is exactly what I am doing to myself. This site is perfect - no matter what your issue is, there is something posted here that completely addresses it in the non-nonsense way I totally appreciate.

Meg
3 weeks and breathing a bit easier.
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Joined: 14 Jun 2009, 20:11

17 Jun 2009, 19:51 #6

I was really touched by your sadness for cigarette breaks. Recently, companies in this nation have been changing to non-smoking employees, as well as non-smoking in the workplace. I considered the benefits of possibly healthier employees, requiring a few dollars less for health care (which is debatable if they live 15 years longer). But what bothered me the most, about the thought of no cigarette breaks, is the idea that you might go all day without looking up, without taking a moment to break the cycle and get a fresh focus; the distraction of seeing the sunshine, and the flowers out on the lawn. I always wondered how the non-smokers did it, never stopping....
But, I think non-smokers have their ways of mental distraction. It just isn't as obvious. For me, I will always take moments to step outside the door. I look forward to feeling a bit more fresh air in my lungs with every breath, and I love the heightened sense of smell. I can be thankful for another day of living, without stinking up nature while doing it:) . I'll be just as thankful to forget the times I walked outside in the freezing cold to "enjoy" a smoke:)
I have a yard full of flowers. Smell this one ...............wow
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Joined: 14 Feb 2009, 20:13

18 Jun 2009, 03:34 #7

just last night (after 19 days) I can't sit on my back porch and not smoke without tears coming to my eyes?

A lot of that is just mental fixation. (JUST?? Right.) Early in my quit, I found the "fake it till you make it" strategy was effective. I had several affirmations that I'd say out loud every day. You might find that this approach works with your back porch. Take the opportunity to smell the summer smells of the neighborhood. Tell yourself, "thank heavens that I can breathe fresh air now". Really appreciate the clean air going in and out. And, for good measure, have something out there with you. A cup of mint tea, maybe... or a book, or both. Smile. Say "I feel great!" Even if you feel totally insincere at first, your subconscious does believe what it hears... soon you will start feeling that you really are fortunate to not have to fuss with the dirty ashtrays and breathe those malodorous fumes. Don't reinforce the old thought patterns. Don't, if you can help it, allow yourself to sink into thoughts about how you "want"... at most, you might think that this trigger is certainly being stubborn. Remember, we all spent years and years brainwashing ourselves into believing that we liked to smoke. It might take a little time and effort to re-learn all of that conditioning.

Hang in there. You can still take breaks... they will just be "fresh air" breaks instead of "toxic fume" breaks.

All the best,
Beth
After 33 smoke-filled years, I've been free for two years, four months, two weeks, one day, 20 hours, 33 minutes and 18 seconds. I saved $4,485.77 because I didn't need to smoke 26005 cigarettes. It feels great!
[img]file:///C:/DOCUME%7E1/ELIZAB%7E1/LOCALS%7E1/Temp/moz-screenshot-13.jpg[/img]
Stay Free!
Beth
(quit 2/2/2007)
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Joined: 30 Mar 2009, 07:57

18 Jul 2009, 22:25 #8

I know what you mean megga. I have not smoked in almost 4 months. I started a new job about 2 months ago, and it is the first job I have had where I didn't smoke. I started when I was 15 and smoked for 6 years, and for every one of the jobs I had during that time, I was one of those people who took a smoke break every hour or so. I am still trying to adjust to not smoking during my breaks. I actually completely stopped taking 10's because I have no idea what to do during them, I just get bored and wander around my work. 30's are kind of strange too, I finish eating in 10 minutes then sit there twiddling my thumbs for 20 minutes. It isn't somethin that I think is going to make me start smoking again, but it does make me think. I am constantly asking myself, what do non smokers do on 10's? But not taking those constant smoke breaks does come with some great benefits. I have always had a very good work ethic, and would get things done really fast. But since I quit smoking I have gotten even better, after only two months I am going to be promoted to a supervisor. And I am pretty sure that you can't find a single person who doesn't like making a little extra money.
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