Did we use nicotine as a 'Reward'?

Did we use nicotine as a 'Reward'?

JoeJFree Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

08 Apr 2008, 04:23 #1

Put this one under the heading of myth busting of a common rationalization / misconception tied into Why do I smoke? 



Did we consciously use nicotine intake as a 'reward' for completing a task?   We may have believed this was the case but I propose that we used any excuse to break a task or event that took longer than 30 to 40 minutes and get to a fix-friendly zone and devour a dose of nicotine.

ImageIndeed, that urge or trigger we recognize early in our recovery process makes us think we are 'missing' an opportunity to 'do something'. Hence, we believe since we are 'missing' something we need to replace it with an alternate activity or worse yet alternate substance of some sort. However the truth of the matter is that there's nothing to replace because nothing is missing. We never needed nicotine to truly live. We only needed nicotine (and hence tobacco smoke or juice ingesting) to prevent withdrawal anxiety perpetrated by our previous doses.



Nothing was missing aside from our NEED to constantly monitor and maintain our blood chemistry saturation level of a highly potent neuro-toxin. We didn't take a break because the task was too long or involved. We made a break in each and every task or routine daily for a dosing opportunity before the discomfort of early withdrawal became too intense.



The best part of recovery of our natural and normal rhythm is that after the multitude of thought associations are broken and replaced with nothing but living life we begin to truly appreciate how life can be and should be lived. Clean of nicotine and free to 'just be' with no need for maintenance feedings or activities of any sort. Granted it takes a bit of time and effort to retrain your brain. Your return to life as it was always meant to be will become complete when you unknowingly enter that stage all longer term quitters call 'comfort.' If you live today without putting nicotine into your already and constantly healing mind and body the desired end result will happen, rest assured. Just ntap and live life. It's all you need to do in reality.

JoeJ
Free - NicotineFree and Living as I was meant to be for Three Years, Two Months, Twenty Eight Days, 6 Hours and 51 Minutes, while reclaiming 205 Days and 10 HoursImage, by choosing not to use 29582 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $6,524.38.

  
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on 19 Jul 2012, 09:43, edited 5 times in total.
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Ilona
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

08 Apr 2008, 08:07 #2

Hey JoeJ Free

Put that in your pipe and smoke it!

I like this post very much indeed. Nicotine is not a "treat" or "reward". It is only associated to pleasure due to a conditioned "aah" response to withdrawal... That is why we ex-smokers should not set ourselves up to think that we "need" to replace nicotine with some other reward, like food. In time, we will no longer be wanting this "reward" because we will no longer feel like "something" is missing without nicotine.

Ilona
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smilingthyme0
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:02

11 Apr 2008, 05:01 #3

ImageLove this, nice one JoeJ....
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johnnynonic
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

17 Nov 2008, 00:51 #4

ImageNothing was missing aside from our NEED to constantly monitor and maintain our blood chemistry saturation level of a highly potent neurotoxin. We didn't take a break because the task was too long or involved. We made a break in each and every task or routine daily for a dosing opportunity before the discomfort of early withdrawal became too intense.
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JohnPolito
Joined: 11 Nov 2008, 19:22

26 May 2010, 22:11 #5

Doc24747 wrote on 05/26/10
alma wrote:
A strang thing happened just when I finished my first post yesterday I had a very strong urge to smoke 
Hi Alma

That's not strange if you think about it. If you are anything like me, you would have a cigarette after you finished just about anything. Hey, we thought we deserved one, didn't we?  An interesting read  Did we use nicotine as a 'Reward'?   Stick with it Alma, you're doing great.

All the best

Doc
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Martin42
Joined: 04 Jan 2013, 14:28

10 Jan 2013, 16:04 #6

As a closet smoker I hid my habit from my wife primarily because I told her i had quit and relasped. She quit nine years ago. She knew I relasped the smell the matches the lighter so not only the issue is smoking but the lies. I lied to my children because they know how bad smoking is so i hid from them. I lied to my mother becuase she is highly anyi smoking because my father died with COPD. Before my father died I lied to him. I felt constant guilt over this habit but continued to smoke. I also lied to myself 19 days free NTAP
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VictoriaFree
Joined: 07 Jan 2013, 19:17

10 Jan 2013, 17:55 #7

Thank you for your post. I lied so many times before and I refuse to be a hypocrite this time. You just reminded me of just how many lies I told in the past to cover my nicotine addiction. Daily, I remind myself that I will not be a hypocrite. Ive been free from nicotine for 13 days and 11 hours. (I smoked for 28 years) I also remind myself that no matter what, I will not take a puff today. I have also save $61 so far. NTAP. 😄
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Joel Spitzer
Joined: 13 Nov 2008, 14:04

10 Jan 2013, 19:08 #8

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Joel Spitzer
Joined: 13 Nov 2008, 14:04

10 Jan 2013, 19:18 #9

From the string Closet smokers[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]
[/font]
[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]How can you use someone's closet smoking status to a possible advantage to help the person quit? If you know someone is smoking and hiding it, don't let on that you know. As soon as you do they feel at liberty to smoke in peace and happiness, after all, they have nothing to hide now.[/font][font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]Instead, congratulate them in every way possible. Let them constantly know how proud you are of them. Lay it on thick. The guilt will eat them alive. Maybe it will make them realize the lie they are living and embarrass them into one of two actions.

One, they may just fess up. At least you will have a little more trust of them. But it may take another more positive turn. They may feel so guilty that they quit smoking. The pleasure of a drug fix will be short lived when the guilt of every puff is added to the other obvious problems that go along with smoking.

The more smoking is recognized as a liability, interfering with a person's health, life, money, self-esteem, the way they smell, look, are perceived by others, and even their personal integrity is at risk as is in the case here, the more likely logic will finally prevail. The only logical solution to avoid such a way of life is to never take another puff!

Joel



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