Crutches to Quit Smoking

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

03 Jul 2004, 23:00 #31

Sometimes activities like running are options that opens up to people once they quit smoking. For the record though, running is something that a person may be able to do now because they want to, not because they have to. This article discusses the importance of always keeping that distinction. The only exercise a person has to do to sustain his or her quit is to always exercise his or her option to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

21 Aug 2004, 19:10 #32

Image The reason a person will have been smoke-free for a week, or a month, or a year, or a decade is not because of some other activity he or she has repetitively done or some other substance he or she had put in his or her mouth, but rather he or she will still be successfully smoke free because of one thing he or she has not put in his or her mouth--a cigarette. To keep this quit going is as simple as sticking to your personal commitment to never take another puff!

Joel
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

27 Sep 2004, 19:35 #33

Could Articles from Joel's Library Form a Crutch?
As Joel points out above, not only can Freedom become a crutch that could be quickly removed by storm, server down time, a computer crash or finances, but written words printed upon paper can be formed into a crutch that if leaned upon too heavily and unavailable at a moment of challenge could threaten recovery.
A crutch is any activity, person, place or thing that you tie to success in quitting and lean upon so heavily that if suddenly removed or unavailable could increase the risk or likelihood of relapse.
If you should forget to carry your list of reasons with you one day, or your favorite Joel article isn't in your pocket or purse when that next challenge strikes, you'll do just fine so long as you maintain a bit of perspective (a subconscious crave episode will last less than three minutes but be sure and look at a clock as recovery time distortion can make the minutes feel like hours) and remember that it is impossible to lose so long as no nicotine finds its way into your bloodstream. No nicotine just one challenge, hour and day at a time ... Never Take Another Puff! John (Gold x5)
Last edited by John (Gold) on 14 Apr 2009, 13:28, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

06 Oct 2004, 07:24 #34

weight gain often results in a state of panic and frustration which can lead the ex-smoker to conclude that he or she would rather be a skinny smoker than an obese ex-smoker. The fallacy which causes the ex-smoker to reach this conclusion is that only two options exist for him or her - smoke or eat more. In fact, other choices exist. One is not smoking and eating in a manner similar to when he or she was a smoker.

If you are going to develop a crutch, make sure it is one which you can maintain for the rest of your life without any interruption. One that carries no risks and can be done anywhere, anytime. About the only crutch which comes close to meeting these criteria is breathing. The day you have to stop breathing, smoking will be of little concern. But until that day, to stay free from cigarettes all you need to do is - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!
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Pryde65 GOLD
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

01 Nov 2004, 03:02 #35

As I learned last night, let nothing be your crutch! That crutch may not be there when you need it most, that person, this board, whatever, and then you will be left with nothing to lean on, nobody to turn to except for yourself and your knowledge...educate yourself and prepare for anything...be ready, be alert, and then you just never take another puff, period.

Sue
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

22 Dec 2004, 22:06 #36

I saw where a member was saying that drinking tea now was making a huge difference in his quit. Taking any specific food or beverage is not in reality going to make or break a quit. The thought that a specific food is going to have a huge impact can easily turn that food or drink into a psychological crutch. It does not matter what other things you put into your mouth, as long as you don't put one specific class of things into your mouth or onto your skin (for patch users.) That thing is nicotine. As long as you keep totally clear of tobacco or nicotine products your quit will stay strong and secure, by simply sticking with your commitment to never take another puff!.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

31 Dec 2004, 12:33 #37

A suggestion was put up to a member facing a stressful situation to consider taking a glass of wine in order to deal with the stress instead of smoking. This post explains the limitations and potential problems associated with that advice.
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Alyson GOLD.ffn
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

11 Jan 2005, 02:38 #38

For all the newbies -

You don't need to adopt any new behaviors to quit smoking (and as Joel's article suggests - even positive lifestyle changes can hurt your recovery more than they help). All you need to do is NTAP. ODAT.

Alyson
Gold x2
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Ladybug592
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:08

19 Jan 2005, 23:33 #39

Since I was a little girl I have an addiction: fruits.... love fruits!
That's one addiction I will never get rid off, and I found out that, when the 'urge' for a cig comes a knocking, I grab few grapes, and the 'cig urge' is gone in no time! I use to smoke a lot in front of my computer, so when I get on it, I have an apple and munch on it slowly, watching TV some peach, or plum, well, you get the idea, it has a double benefit, your cig craving is gone and you are eating something that is good for you.
Ana Image

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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

20 Jan 2005, 00:55 #40

This article discusses the limitations of using any food item as a crutch. The primary limitation is that at some point the specific food may be unavailable at a time when a cigarette presents itself. The reason I want to address the post above is the comment written that the person has been addicted to fruit for a long time. I'm going to pose a few questions to the person.

Have you ever gone through the garbage to take an extra couple of bites from a piece of fruit that was discarded hours earlier? Have you ever seen a half eaten piece of fruit in a gutter and gotten a little bit excited that maybe you can get a couple of extra bites out of it now? Do you see apples or pears with just a bite or two out of them on tables in restaurants and sneak them out to devour later? If your doctor were to tell you today that he was going to do a surgery where you couldn't chew or taste food for a few days or weeks, would you be asking him to make an extra large orifice into your throat to accommodate getting a pear or an orange straight to your stomach? (see the post "I smoke because I like the flavor" )

If your answer to these questions is "no," understand that what you have to fruit is not an addiction. You like fruit but fruit does not control you and fruit has not been slowly crippling you or threatening your life. Nicotine addiction has been controlling you and threatening your health and your life. We want to make sure that no people who read here minimizes just what are members and readers are dealing with. We are dealing with a drug addiction--an addiction that is only kept at bay by a total understanding and commitment to stop delivering nicotine from all tobacco and nicotine replacement products and as far as for smoking tobacco products to stick with the promise that you made to yourself to never take another puff!

Joel
Last edited by Joel on 14 Apr 2009, 13:32, edited 1 time in total.
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