Crutches to Quit Smoking

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

16 Oct 2002, 01:35 #21

I just tackled the sunflower seed crutch that I have heard used often on the Internet and for even longer from people coming into clinics.

Sunflower seeds are not that particularly low in calories. One ounce worth which can easily be eaten in a serving would be 162 calories. Lets day you "treat" yourself to one serving a day at one ounce each as a kind of crutch replacement to quitting smoking. In one month you would have consumed 4,860 extra calories which will translate to almost 1.4 pounds of fat. In one year this replacement behavior if not stopped would translate to over 16 pounds of extra fat. Be careful with food as a substituted behavior, no matter how natural the food may be.

The only crutch that involves no risk or implications is breathing. You can do it any time and any where you want to and the day you have to stop breathing, well smoking probably wouldn't make a difference that particular day. Except even on that dreadful day taking a drag would rob you of your final victory to have proven to yourself and the world that you were a person of your word--for the day you joined here and quit smoking you had made a promise to yourself that you were personally committed to never take another puff!

Joel

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

17 Mar 2003, 23:49 #22

I saw where one member wrote to another member that he or she should do what ever it takes to quit smoking. The example specifically given was drink water or eat ice cream. I have to say, if someone plans on going the ice cream route they had better be ready to go buy a whole slew of complete wardrobes, of ever increasing sizes. If your crutch for smoking thoughts are going to be any high caloric food weight gain of massive amounts should be expected.

As far as using whatever it takes, I guess that can be translated to taking any food, any drug, legal or illegal to quit smoking or any activity, no matter how ludicrous or dangerous that activity may be. Does the comment smoke crack cocaine, or shoot up heroin, or drink lethal dosages of arsenic make any sense to anyone as practical advice to quit smoking? If not, the comment of do whatever it takes loses any real concept of credibility.

The comment needs to be do what it takes to quit smoking. What it takes is simply sticking to your commitment to never take another puff!

Joel
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OBob Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

15 Aug 2003, 03:12 #23

This is an issue to be aware of. The question you need to ask yourself:
"am I doing whatever it is I'm doing as a REPLACEMENT for my nic-fix?"
Not every new behavior is a replacement. Some are healthy adjustments we make when we realize that we've been substituting nicotine for various normal activities like drinking water, or taking naps (see Recognizing needs). Some things we do are simply comforting activities that help us cope with the anxiety that often surrounds quittng (back rubs, a walk on the beach, a cool glass of water....). Only you know whether something has crossed the line, and become a replacement; it's a question you need to ask yourself.
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Last edited by OBob Gold on 14 Apr 2009, 13:19, edited 1 time in total.
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VoluntaryDebraSilver
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 18:57

12 Dec 2003, 11:38 #24

People who have never had a cigarette and won't ever have a cigarette--non-smokers, do things. They jog, exersize, eat chocolate, diet, stress, drink alcohol and on and on and on. When is it wrong for a recovering nicotine addict to do these things and normal for a non-smoker? Debra Flower - Free and Healing for Thirteen Days, 20 Hours and 8 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 1 Day and 10 Hours, by avoiding the use of 415 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $64.39.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

04 Jan 2004, 22:04 #25

Fear of Bad Health vs. Hope of Good Health
Bad or even failing health is often a powerful motivator in causing the actively feeding nicotine addict to contemplate engaging in nicotine dependency recovery but the amazing ability of the body to heal and mend itself, at least those bodily functions most visible to us (like smell, taste, improved breathing, and an obviously slower heart rate), can quickly leave the once wheezing quitter feeling that their primary concern was vastly overblown. When it comes to relapse it can almost feel like your crutch (fear of failing health) has been pulled out from beneath you as healing causes your primary motivation to seem to gradually evaporate before your very eyes.
Clearly we don't correct years of lung damage (

Smoking's Impact on the Lungs
Last edited by John (Gold) on 14 Apr 2009, 13:21, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

13 Jan 2004, 22:12 #26

Turning to food, especially high calorie sweet foods, will usually result in a psychological need with a subsequent weight gain. The risk of weight gain is insignificant in comparison to the dangers associated with cigarettes. The ex-smoker would have to gain over 100 pounds to create the equivalent health hazard of cigarette smoking. But weight gain often results in a state of panic and frustration which can lead the ex-smoker to conclude that he or she would rather be a skinny smoker than an obese ex-smoker. The fallacy which causes the ex-smoker to reach this conclusion is that only two options exist for him or her - smoke or eat more. In fact, other choices exist. One is not smoking and eating in a manner similar to when he or she was a smoker. Another is increasing activity levels to compensate for the added caloric intake when eating extra amounts.

Sidenote: The quantity of weight that needs to be gained to pose a similar risk to your heart as smoking is 75 pounds. The numbers were revised after I originally wrote this.
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

16 Jan 2004, 09:07 #27

Quitting by crutch replacement carries varying degrees of risks. Turning to any other addictive substance, even legal or prescribed drugs, carries the risk of a new addiction. In many of these cases the end result will be a more significant problem than just the original smoking. The new addiction can cause the person's life to end in shambles, and when it comes time to deal with the new dependance he or she will often relapse to cigarettes.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

24 May 2004, 21:47 #28

Be careful forming a support system with any other specific person on the board or even in your real life. Here is a link to the post on the potential pitfalls of a buddy system. Every person here needs to be independent of any other specific individual in regards to your quit. You can use the entire board as a support network, but don't be tied into any one individual. And you also should have some computer independent ammunition ready in those time where computer access becomes limited too.
The reason you must be careful of having your quit tied into another person's quit is that you do not know that that a specific individual will be there in a time of need or worse yet, that they will still be smoke free when you are in a weak moment. You can quit at the same time as other people but your quit must be for you and their quit must be for them. Both of you can make it though as long as you both understand the bottom line premise that to stay free you must never take another puff!
Joel
Last edited by Joel on 14 Apr 2009, 13:25, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

09 Jun 2004, 19:25 #29

I saw where one newer member wrote to another longer term member that the newer members needed him or her here. This is not the case. This string talks about how even Freedom itself should not be used as a cructh, let alone any specific member. It is dangerous to feel that your quit is contingent on any specific person or group. Your quit is only contingent on one person and one person only and that person is you. Your quit will continue to succeed as long as you stay totally committed to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

20 Jun 2004, 22:39 #30

I see a few people are experiencing technical difficulties while trying to post. There is a danger of using anything as a crutch, even Freedom itself. For if you ever experience tough times during times when we are experiencing technical difficulties, either reading or posting at Freedom may not be possible, you can start to feel that your quit will not stick since you don't have us as a crutch. We need to be seen as a tool, a source of information of how to quit and how to stay off even more than a source of support. In the technological world a particular website may not always be going 24 hours a day 365 days a year without interruption, or your computer capabilities may not be able to get here at some points in time.

If you have learned our lessons, keep reinforcing your own primary reasons for first wanting to quit, keep reminding yourself why you still don't want to go back and keep our one simple message in your mind at all times, even if you can't read it at the board at the moment, just remembering it will insure that you will do fine. The message is that no matter what seems to go wrong in life that to stay free during it only requires keeping in practice your commitment to never take another puff!
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