Crutches to Quit Smoking

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

05 Feb 2002, 04:32 #11

For all our members and lurkers considering the use of "natural" or herbal remedies to quit smoking. The physiological need for nicotine will not be broken or influenced by taking another product, it is broken simply by not taking nicotine. It is no more complicated or expensive than that. I think a lot of people are getting a false sense of needing another product or method to make quitting possible. The vast majority of people who have quit smoking have not used such methods and equally important, the vast majority of people who use such products don't actually quit smoking. Save your money and risk of unnecessary complications and just know that the way to quit smoking and stay free from smoking only entails knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

04 Mar 2002, 21:50 #12

I had a member bring up in an email to me a few days ago that she thought she may have started drinking more alcohol after she had stopped smoking. I can't say it strong enough that this is a dangerous practice. Taking up any other behavior at a higher level after quitting smoking can easily be indicating a possible substitution behavior and thus carries an implication of being a crutch replacement. This is bad enough with a pattern that may be habit forming but when dealing with a substance that has an addictive potential in its own right, it can be downright dangerous.

Again, this article spells out the pitfalls of crutch replacement. Be cognizant of any new establishing patterns and just recognize that the reason you are not smoking days, or weeks, or months or even years after you quit is not by activities you have done and not by things you have put in your mouth. The way you have stayed off cigarettes is by what you have not put in your mouth--a cigarette.

To continue to stay smoke free still only requires that you never administer nicotine from any source again, or stated more clearly, that you never take a swig of nicotine water, stick nicotine on your skin to be absorbed, inject nicotine into your arm, inhale nicotine through a nicotine inhaler, put nicotine in your mouth via a cigar or pipe, **** on nicotine in the form of a lollipop, stick nicotine up your nose in the form of snuff, plant nicotine in your cheek in the form of chewing tobacco, and of course--never stick nicotine in your mouth in the form of a cigarette and basically just knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

17 Mar 2002, 08:05 #13

As in the post above, comments are coming to me via email that many of our posts have a heavy drinking influence about them. It appears that some people may get the impression that drinking is condoned as an alternative behavior to smoking. It used to be where you would go to AA meetings and it would appear that everyone was smoking. I personally encountered numerous people who went into alcohol treatment programs as never smokers and who came out of treatment heavy addicted smokers. It was obvious that their encouraged behavior was a direct crutch replacement. We don't want anyone to get the same impression about drinking as a replacement to smoking. I want this statement to be perfectly clear...DO NOT INCREASE DRINKING OF ALCOHOL IN ANY WAY, SHAPE OR FORM NOW THAT YOU HAVE QUIT SMOKING.

Also, do not use this site to glamorize drinking. There are people here who are recovering alcoholics who find posting about the fun and glamour of drinking to be quite disconcerting. Also, the frequent use of the emoticons, portraying a mug or a champaign toast are really seen as poor taste to these people. Put yourself in their place--if you belonged to a site that was on a totally different topic, and people came in touting the joys of recreational smoking, you would feel the need to enlighten the group or could be offended and annoyed with the casual way the subject was being portrayed. You could then either feel the need to take it head on and stir up debate with the group, or just leave the group. Neither of these options is acceptable to us at Freedom--for we have strict policies about diversional posts, and the idea of a person leaving because of an issue that is really unnecessary is abhorrent to us. Because the people who are here trying to secure their quits are here because they are fighting for their lives. Their needs then take precedent over people who are here for more social or fun reasons.

Freedom is a quit smoking education and support site. We try to get the message out that life goes on without smoking--things you could do before can still be done after quitting. Things that could not be done before, such as safe or controlled drinking for a recovering alcoholic cannot be done now either. So as a general rule of thumb now, we are asking members to minimize the amount of time they are posting about drinking at this site. We have ample strings to cover alcohol issues. We will continue to bring them up as holidays come up, and around weekends where drinking situations are often encountered more frequently. But we ask that people who are regular users of alcohol not to raise the issue over and over again.

Joel
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

21 Apr 2002, 20:50 #14

One of the cardinal principles here at Freedom is that in order to break free from nicotine all we Imageneed to give up is nicotine - nothing else! There may be some situations or risks that we may want to go slow with, or even delay for a bit, but the only thing causing any user's brain to grow or activate millions and millions of extra nicotinic receptors, and keeping them chemically dependent, is nicotine itself!


The other side of the coin is equally important. It's a cardinal principle here at Freedom that in giving up only our nicotine that members not pick up any new crutches either, as once that crutch is removed the risk of falling is increased. Additional food can be an oral crutch that, if allowed, may demoralize your incentive to continue this wonderful journey of healing! Leaning too heavily on a quitting buddy or heavy reliance on loved ones for motivation can be a dangerous crutch should your buddy relapse or your family not appreciate the length of this temporary period of re-adjustment. Even something as wonderful as a new exercise plan can be a crutch in that should it end you'll again be on your own!


Joel wrote a piece yesterday about quitting being a lonely journey that really struck a chord in me. As he noted, one of the wonderful things about Freedom is that we have each other and a growing wealth of wisdom to turn to. It's ok to go on a health kick, to find hightened food flavors exciting or engage in new activites and it's also ok to fall in love with food and decide that you wouldn't look so bad in an extra 40 pounds but if you're a new member we encourage you to consider the wisdom of holding off on any new campaigns for just a couple of weeks, at least until you get the ten days to two weeks of primary physiological re-adjustment behind you! That way your recovery won't be to blame and the risks will be substantially diminished!


Baby steps and patience to glory! We can all make it!

John - The Gold Club
Last edited by John (Gold) on 08 Jul 2009, 11:45, edited 2 times in total.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

21 Apr 2002, 20:56 #15

Here is the post John is referring to: Quitting can be a very lonely experience
Last edited by Joel on 14 Apr 2009, 13:13, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

18 May 2002, 02:42 #16

Image For Tash:

Relying too heavily on anything, even Freedom itself can become a crutch. Don't see us as a crutch to quit, rather see us as a tool to help you understand what you have to do to keep your quit. You are the only important variable making or breaking your attempt. You will succeed forever as long as you always remember why you have chosen to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

07 Jun 2002, 20:33 #17

Image For Dos:

There is a danger of using anything as a crutch, even Freedom itself. For as you are experiencing, during times of technical difficulties where you cannot post you can start to feel that your quit will not stick since you don't have your crutch--Freedom. We need to be seen as a tool, a source of information of how to quit and how to stay off even more than a source of support. In the technological world a particular website may not always be going 24 hours a day 365 days a year without interruption, or your computer capabilities may not be able to get here at some points in time. But if you have learned our lessons, keep reinforcing your own primary reasons for first wanting to quit, keep reminding yourself why you still don't want to go back and keep our one simple message with you that even if you can't read it at the moment it is easy enough to remember you will do fine--the message is that no matter what seems to go wrong in life that to stay free during it only requires keeping in practice your commitment to never take another puff!

Joel
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Hillbilly(Gold)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:03

11 Jun 2002, 19:20 #18

Joel, what you and I have discussed more than once has actually happened to me. Two weeks ago I suffered a groin pull playing tennis. I hadn't played since 1975.

Yeah, it was stupid, but I felt so good just being able to play that I kinda overdid it. Anyway, point to this post is the doctor told me to lay off all exercise for a while. No walking, no biking, complete rest.

We had talked about this in abstract in the last few weeks, and I got to find out for real what the answer is. Is exercise a crutch for me?

The answer is, maybe it was a cane, but not a crutch. Yes, I missed it, and yes my mood was not the best, but no I did not relapse or even want to. Like a lot of things, I went to the edge and looked over but exercise was not a crutch.

I did come close enough to realize how easy it would be to make exercise, or anything else for that matter, a crutch for nicotine. Just one more reminder that each of our quits is a very fragile thing, not something to be taken lightly. Overconfidence can be a dangerous attitude.

I have to remember how tough the first two weeks were. I don't need to totally forget about smoking and I need to keep my guard up. If I totally forget, then a suprise crave will only remind me of the good ones, not all the rest.

But I digress. Or is it rambling? Bottom line, be very careful of crutches.

Dave

I have chosen not to smoke for 1 Month 3 Weeks 3 Days 9 Hours 20 Minutes 42 Seconds. Somewhere there are 1903 extra cigarettes.
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Juanjuanjuanjuanjuan200
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

18 Jul 2002, 03:24 #19

Tottally agree. No way. No adding a problem. But then again, the nature of the problem is so different, that one does not notice it. The reading of these texts has made me realize a couple of crutches, i have been holding on to. Why call it crutches, look to me like unknotted ropes to the sky? I am so down, feeling like starting again.

Juan
I have been Quit for: 1M 6D 16h 23m. I have NOT smoked 942, for a savings of $141.31. Life Saved: 3D 6h 30m.
will not take another puff.
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Lilac (Bronze)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

29 Sep 2002, 21:34 #20

Joel, you are , of course, absolutely right. I do not want to be beholden to any addiction or crutch. I will be ss severe on my vague yearnings as I am on my desire to smoke. Not tomorrow when I may feel better but today when I don't want to face them. O,K, Lilac
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