Cilia

Cilia

Joel
Joel

July 5th, 2001, 1:14 am #1

Hello Everyone:

Since the question of cilia and coughing and lung damage comes up often I figured I would try to show some illustrations as to what happens in the lungs from smoking. In this string I am going to concentrate at the microscopic level, in the lining tissue of the bronchus.

On the top we see the cilia, labeled (H). They are attached to columnar cells, labeled (I). The cilia sweep the mucous produced in the goblet cells, labeled (J) as well as mucous coming from deeper glands within the lungs and the particulate matter trapped in the mucous. The bottom layer of cells, labeled (L) are the basal cells.
The above picture is representative of a healthy non-smokers lung. Below we start to see the changes that occur as people begin to smoke. You will see that the columnar cells are starting to be crowded out and displaced by additional layers of basal cells. Not only are fewer cilia present but the ones that are still functioning are doing so at a much lower level of efficiency. Many chemicals in tobacco smoke are toxic to cilia, first slowing them down, soon paralyzing them all together and then destroying them.
As you see with the cilia actions being diminished, mucous starts to build up in the small airways making it harder for the smoker to breath and causing the characteristic smokers cough in order to clear out the airways.

Eventually though, the ciliated columnar cells are totally displaced. As can be seen below ominous changes have taken place. Not only is the smoker more prone to infection from the loss of the cleansing mechanism of the cilia, but these abnormal cells (O) are cancerous squamous cells. These cells will eventually break through the basement membrane wall and invade into underlying lung tissue and often spread throughout the body long before the person even knows they have the disease.


If a smoker quits before cancer actually starts, even if the cells are in a precancerous state, the process is highly reversible. Cilia regeneration starts in about 3 days once smoking stops. Even if cilia has been destroyed and not present for years, the lining tissue of the windpipe will start to repair. Even the precancerous cells will be sloughed off over time, reversing the cellular process to the point where the lining tissue goes back to normal. But if a smoker waits too long and cancer starts, it may be too late to save his or her life.



You just don't know which cigarette was going to be the one to start an irreversible process. To reduce your risk you must stop the deposit of the thousands of chemicals, especially the 43 known carcinogens that come in with every puff of a cigarette you take. To stop this process thus reducing your risk cancer, as well as helping to keep your lungs clean of other irritants by allowing the healing of the cilia, you must always remember and practice the simple treatment of knowing to never take another puff!



Joel

Commentary added 2-2-09

We now have the ability to edit our old posts. Since I am going to refer to this post often when questions of cilia are raised, I am going to enhance the first post in this string by combining some of the latter posts to this first post in the string. This is a commentary added in the eighth response to this string:


The above string explains how the healing process can cause cold like symptoms. As the cilia starts to break up and sweep out mucous, coughing and congestion can follow. On top of this there is regeneration of nerve cells that were also destroyed from the chronic abuse of smoking on the lungs and trachea. But life goes on without smoking, and people still can get infections after cessation. So while cold and flu like symptoms can often be attributed to initial cessation, there is also always the possibility that a cold or flu is also responsible. Symptoms should be treated with the same caution as you would normally exercise when you were a smoker. If long enough or severe enough, getting checked out is a prudent course to follow.



Always know the best way to help prevent such problems in the future, and even more serious lung diseases that don't just have a short course of a week or two with a return to normal, is to keep your lung from ever being assaulted again from the thousands of chemicals, hundreds of poisons and 43 known carcinogens in tobacco smoke. The only way to stop this assault is to never take another puff!



Joel





The following video discusses the nerve regeneration issue:

Learning how to inhale


New related video added 11-26-2012:






Link to cilia information in lung cancer video (link added 7-3-2013)
Last edited by Joel on July 3rd, 2013, 10:27 am, edited 5 times in total.
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

July 5th, 2001, 1:39 am #2

This post is attempting to illustrate what is happening in the lungs of a smoker at the cellular level. When combined with the information in the string about watching others smoke, especially the full lung specimens and the palmolive bottle and smoking machine experiments I am hoping it gives a pretty good overview of the damage of smoking to your lungs and the importance of staying smoke free. The more you see cigarettes for what they are they stronger your desire will be to never take another puff!
Joel
Last edited by Joel on April 14th, 2009, 5:52 am, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

July 5th, 2001, 8:38 pm #3


A postcard from a smokers cilia
Miss you, wish I were there.
Just a little cilia message from Joel
Never take another puff!

Quote
Share

LadyJen22
LadyJen22

July 6th, 2001, 12:30 pm #4

Joel,
I really enjoy these posts you have been making lately with the cilia pictures and the healthy nonsmokers lungs v. the smokers lungs. I have been looking for info like this. It really helps put it all into perspective to actually know and see what is happening inside of our bodies now that we aren't poisoning ourselves anymore. I'd like to see more and more of this info if you have it. I had looked at dozens of pictures of diseased lungs, but not being in the medical profession, to the typical layman (me) I wasn't sure what I was looking at until I saw what a healthy lung looked like.
Keep Sharing, I find it fascinating. Sad, but, reinforcing.
Jen
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

July 6th, 2001, 7:21 pm #5

Okay Jen I am happy to fulfill your request. Today I put up a string starting to explain the circulation problems caused by cigarette smoking. I'll develop the string further over the next few days. By the time we are finished I think you will have your whole body committed to the concept that it will never take another puff!
Joel
Last edited by Joel on April 14th, 2009, 5:54 am, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

July 14th, 2001, 1:55 am #6

I saw some discussion of coughs occuring weeks and months into a quit. Yes it can last for months, up to six for some people where they are coughing more than when smoking. And yes it can be a very productive cough with lots of gunk being brought up. But if you are experiencing the cough and sore throat also keep in mind that it is also possible that you are getting a cold or some kind of infection too. You don't want to automatically assume not smoking is the cause of everything.

Anyway this string describes the repair processes kicked in when you quit and the regeneration of the cilia that is enhancing the cleansing of the lung, possibly inducing the described effects. To keep your lungs on track of constantly cleaning themselves out always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

July 16th, 2001, 12:07 am #7

I just got my actual pathological slides showing the cilia destruction caused by tobacco smoke. Here is a slide of the normal lining tissue of a bronchus.
The little pink hairlike projections on the top is the cilia and if you compare this image with the illustrations above you should be able to see the mucous secreting cells and the separation of the lining tissue from the underlying lung tissue.
Below you can see the same area of tissue from a smoker's lung who has totally destroyed the cilia in this tissue.
Again note, where there used to be two layers of well formed and orginized basal cells, now numerous layers of disorganized squamous cells has replaced the normal defensive tissue. These cells are precancerous and if the continued irritation (cigarette smoke) is not ceased can go to that final stage where they become malignant and invade into the underlying lunng tissue as seen below.
Then it is only a matter of time before it leaves the lung and spreads throughout the body. If the smoker quits smoking before this last cellular change occurs, before a cell turns malignant, the process seen in this last slide can be avoided. In fact much of the damage seen in the second picture here is highly reversible.
In three days cilia start to regenerate and usually within 6 months the normal cilia function is returned. Also over time, the extra layers of cells will be sloughed off and the lining tissue of the bronchus will return to normal.
To continue to heal the damages caused by your past smoking and to avoid all future damages smoking would have continued to inflict on your body always remember to never take another puff!
Joel
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

July 26th, 2001, 7:06 pm #8

For Cyndi:

The above string explains how the healing process can cause cold like symptoms. As the cilia starts to break up and sweep out mucous, coughing and congestion can follow. On top of this there is regeneration of nerve cells that were also destroyed from the chronic abuse of smoking on the lungs and trachea. But life goes on without smoking, and people still can get infections after cessation. So while cold and flu like symptoms can often be attributed to initial cessation, there is also always the possibility that a cold or flu is also responsible. Symptoms should be treated with the same caution as you would normally exercise when you were a smoker. If long enough or severe enough, getting checked out is a prudent course to follow.

Always know the best way to help prevent such problems in the future, and even more serious lung diseases that don't just have a short course of a week or two with a return to normal, is to keep your lung from ever being assaulted again from the thousands of chemicals, hundreds of poisons and 43 known carcinogens in tobacco smoke. The only way to stop this assault is to never take another puff!

Joel
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

November 14th, 2001, 5:11 am #9

For KerBer in response to an email. Not everyone coughs more immediately and some people may never develop the cough that is often characteristic after quitting. But the cilia is regenerating and is going to be cleaning out your lungs, it just may be doing it at a pace which isn't overloading your airways and thus the mucous is quietly being swept out. Although some people will still develop the cough a few weeks into their quit as opposed to a few days as is experienced by many.
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

February 3rd, 2002, 1:28 am #10

The cilia regeneration and the corresponding healing and cleansing process can last for weeks or for months. The more stuff you cough out of your lungs--the better you will breath for the rest of your life. To keep the healing going and end any further assault that smoking would have continued to do to your cilia and other lung tissues just always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
Quote
Share

betsybe
betsybe

March 12th, 2002, 3:57 pm #11

Very motivational!!! I've read over and over that it takes three days to get the nicotine out of the system, but what about all those other chemicals? Is it possible that some of them take several months? Or even years? I've heard that after quitting marijuana, it takes as long as 7 years to get it all out of your body. Where can I find more information about healing /dedtoxing from the other chemicals in cigarettes?
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

March 12th, 2002, 8:41 pm #12

Hello Betsybe:
I put an answer to your question in the string Smoking's Impact on the Lungs. I stuck it there because it covers the overall lung issue more than just the lining tissue, so I was able to describe what damages get repaired and which don't. I hope this answers your question. Just know, your lungs are infinitely better off, not to mention your heart and overall cardiovascular systems, which in fact numerically is the greatest risk of premature death caused by smoking, and will stay better off as long as you never take another puff!
Joel
Last edited by Joel on April 14th, 2009, 5:56 am, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

May 22nd, 2002, 9:01 am #13

Cilia that has been destroyed--even if it is gone for over 20 years (for Bill) will regenerate when a person quits smoking. The body's ability to repair is great if given a chance and the only chance cilia needs to come back is for the person to always keep in practice his or her committment to never take another puff!

Joel
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

May 26th, 2002, 10:07 pm #14

Even if you are not coughing, your cilia are regenerating and you are likely still sweeping your lungs clean--it is just coming out at a more gradual pace where it is not requiring coughing to bring it out. Keep in mind, cilia are working everyday in all non-smokers, sweeping and cleaning and yet most non-smokers only cough and hack when they are sick and in essense have excess mucous being produced that overwhelms the cilia capabilities. Your cilia will continue to heal and eventually be back to full capabilities as long as you always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

September 10th, 2002, 6:28 am #15

The concept of cilia regeneration is talked about in The smoking dream, so I thought I would tie these two strings together a little here.
Last edited by Joel on April 14th, 2009, 5:59 am, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

January 6th, 2003, 8:54 pm #16

The above string explains how the healing process can cause cold like symptoms. As the cilia starts to break up and sweep out mucous, coughing and congestion can follow. On top of this there is regeneration of nerve cells that were also destroyed from the chronic abuse of smoking on the lungs and trachea. But life goes on without smoking, and people still can get infections after cessation. So while cold and flu like symptoms can often be attributed to initial cessation, there is also always the possibility that a cold or flu is also responsible. Symptoms should be treated with the same caution as you would normally exercise when you were a smoker. If long enough or severe enough, getting checked out is a prudent course to follow.

Always know the best way to help prevent such problems in the future, and even more serious lung diseases that don't just have a short course of a week or two with a return to normal, is to keep your lung from ever being assaulted again from the thousands of chemicals, hundreds of poisons and 43 known carcinogens in tobacco smoke. The only way to stop this assault is to never take another puff!

Joel
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

February 6th, 2003, 9:12 pm #17


Another example of humor to get across a serious point about quitting smoking:

A postcard from a smokers cilia
Miss you, wish I were there.
Just a little cilia message from Joel
Never take another puff!

I actually mailed a postcard like this to about 3,000 clinic graduates many years ago. It was amazing what kind of fun I was able to have when I had a budget. But I suspect that this one card really reinforced a lot of people back then. I was always amazed at how many people after years of quitting smoking would still talk about how happy they were to have their cilia back. It was often stated as one of the primary pieces of ammunition to keep them focused as to why they knew that they were going to stay committed to never take another puff!
Joel
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

August 8th, 2004, 7:06 pm #18

Not everyone coughs more immediately and some people may never develop the cough that is often characteristic after quitting. But the cilia is regenerating and is going to be cleaning out your lungs, it just may be doing it at a pace which isn't overloading your airways and thus the mucous is quietly being swept out. Although some people will still develop the cough a few weeks into their quit as opposed to a few days as is experienced by many.
Quote
Share

Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

May 14th, 2006, 9:09 am #19

From above:

You just don't know which cigarette was going to be the one to start an irreversible process.
To reduce your risk you must stop the deposit of the thousands of chemicals, especially the 43 known carcinogens that come in with every puff of a cigarette you take.
To stop this process thus reducing your risk cancer, as well as helping to keep your lungs clean of other irritants by allowing the healing of the cilia, you must always remember and practice the simple treatment of knowing to never take another puff!
Quote
Like
Share

helenrabinowitz
helenrabinowitz

June 2nd, 2006, 11:18 pm #20

thank you!! The last paragraph about how the repair process works was really helpful.....
I spent a great deal of time in the hospital over the last two months (non-smoking related) and have had almost every test known to man! So I figure if the damage was irreversible, I would know.....

Thank you for that information - I really feel better.....
15 days quit!
Michelle aka Helen Rabinowitz
Quote
Share

FoolNoMore2
FoolNoMore2

July 21st, 2006, 11:16 am #21

Thank you. I really needed to know about the lack of being able to cough any of the garbage out. I actually went to the doctor the other day because my lungs have felt so tight and I have gone from having a very deep smoker's cough to absolutely nothing. If I do cough, it's very dry and tight. Doctor doesn't have an explanation as to why and says my lungs are clear (I had a heart stress test 6 mos ago and everything was fine with that, so heart problems is ruled out). Told me not to worry about it and if I walk that will help my lungs clear...the problem is the activity-induced asthma....but I'm going to give it a go anyway.

I'm still very new at this and after 44 years of smoking, I certainly know it's going to take more than 16 days to heal. I absolutely cannot believe after only 16 days, how great I feel. It's been so long since I have felt good, I don't ever remember feeling this great...even with the tight lungs!!! Thank you so much for your help!!!

Barb...will NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!!! Free from nicotine for 16 days, 11 hours and 6 minutes.
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

August 17th, 2006, 9:21 pm #22

A question came up about coughing up darkened phlegm after quitting. This string explains how the healing process can cause cold like symptoms or the coughing up of tars collected over the years of smoking. These effects can go on for weeks or months for some people.

But life goes on without smoking, and sometimes there are other conditions that can cause the coughing up of dark specks. These conditions should never be ignored or written off to just not smoking.

Symptoms should be treated with the same caution as you would normally exercise when you were a smoker. If long enough or severe enough, getting checked out is a prudent course to follow. Once any problems are ruled out by your physician you will have the true peace of mind that the symptom is simply part of the healing and cleansing process that occurs from quitting.

Always know the best way to help prevent such problems in the future, and even more serious lung diseases that don't just have a short course of a week or two with a return to normal, is to keep your lung from ever being assaulted again from the thousands of chemicals, hundreds of poisons and 43 known carcinogens in tobacco smoke. The only way to stop this assault is to never take another puff!

Joel
Quote
Share

Marixpress
Marixpress

September 8th, 2006, 1:38 am #23

Is there a natural way to facilitate the cleansing process?
Quote
Share

Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

September 8th, 2006, 7:00 am #24

Hi Marixpress,
The cleansing process is underway and as long as you never take another puff it will continue.
It is not only your lungs which are benefitting but also the rest of your entire body.
Have you read these?
Lungs - their destruction or healing
Smoking and circulation
Health recovery and risk reduction time table
"I don't want to die!" - the bottom line? No nicotine today, never take another puff!
Sal
Last edited by Sal GOLD.ffn on April 14th, 2009, 6:10 am, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Like
Share

tcouch0
tcouch0

January 15th, 2007, 6:05 am #25

Joel,
I have seen the pictures of the smokers blackened (tar) lungs and the neveer-smokers pink lungs. I was wondering (can't find info on topic) if after quitting smoking the smokers lungs return to a pink color?
Thanks,
Teresa - Free and Healing for Twenty Nine Days, 18 Hours and 4 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 1 Day and 13 Hours, by avoiding the use of 446 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $83.78.
Quote
Share