Carrying Cigarettes

Nana08
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 18:56

09 Jan 2003, 23:30 #31

Hi!

I quit 12/31/02! Found your website quite by accident & have been "addicted" every since. Just been lurking around absorbing everything I read trying to get up my nerve to start posting.

THANKS FOR BEING THERE,
Carol
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

13 Mar 2003, 20:47 #32

ImageFor Millie. I think Lulumae will appreciate this one too. They both knew to get rid of all cigarettes in the house.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

08 May 2003, 00:48 #33

For OxygenAddict: Ex-smokers should never keep stashes of cigarettes around--not from day one of a quit. One reason is for the real risk of smoking it, and the second reason is that as long as a person keeps cigarettes he or she is also keeping a mindset that he or she is a smoker trying not to smoke as opposed to being an ex-smoker. Ex-smokers and never smokers have no reasons to keep cigarettes around--why would they? It serves no purpose to them.

As long as a person feels like a smoker trying not to smoke, he or she is going to have the psychological problems and play the little mind games of a smoker trying not to smoke. When you cross over to the frame of mind that you are not a smoker trying not to smoke but rather you are now an ex-smoker--and that is what you want to be--the psychological benefit can be both powerful and profound.

If you work on proper frame of mind in the beginning, you can feel this difference a minute into your quit and you will prove yourself right as long as you always remember that you are committed to never take another puff!

Joel
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CKay87
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 18:56

08 May 2003, 01:23 #34

ImageAgreed - live and learn. At least I had a happy ending to the story.

I have a quitting friend (she's 2.5 months into it) who won't empty her ashtray because she likes the smell. What do you say to something like that???
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

18 May 2003, 00:34 #35

ImageI see we have a lot of new people joining in all at once. I thought I had better bring up some of our advice topics applicable for new member.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

27 Jul 2003, 20:07 #36

A new quitter keeping cigarettes around just to prove Image they can, is akin to a person on suicide watch carrying a loaded gun. With a triggered crave being less than 3 minutes in duration (be sure and look at a clock as time distortion is a very real symptom during quitting and your mind may try to convince you that it's 3 hours instead) one of your best weapons against relapse is delay one minute, delay two minutes, delay for a third minute, if need be!

Why have a gun handy while waiting on the urge to use it? It makes no sense!

Each crave will end in a very short period of time whether you feed it or not. If you know where "it" or "they" are then you'd be well advised to flush or crush your hidden stash! Baby steps to glory! This is doable! John (Gold)
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Joanne Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

01 Oct 2003, 08:51 #37

For Mankeegan:

Like cigarettes, anything containing nicotine should be destroyed. We never want to give our left-over cigarettes or nicotine products to anyone else. I've heard Joel give this advice at his clinics.

JoanneImage


Ex-smokers should never keep stashes of cigarettes around--not from day one of a quit. One reason is for the real risk of smoking it, and the second reason is that as long as a person keeps cigarettes he or she is also keeping a mindset that he or she is a smoker trying not to smoke as opposed to being an ex-smoker. Ex-smokers and never smokers have no reasons to keep cigarettes around--why would they? It serves no purpose to them.

As long as a person feels like a smoker trying not to smoke, he or she is going to have the psychological problems and play the little mind games of a smoker trying not to smoke. When you cross over to the frame of mind that you are not a smoker trying not to smoke but rather you are now an ex-smoker--and that is what you want to be--the psychological benefit can be both powerful and profound.

If you work on proper frame of mind in the beginning, you can feel this difference a minute into your quit and you will prove yourself right as long as you always remember that you are committed to never take another puff!

Joel

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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

02 Oct 2003, 20:34 #38

I saw one of our newer member came across a pack of cigarettes today. I thought she would appreciate reading this one.
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DlunyGOLD
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

08 Dec 2003, 06:12 #39

The day I quit smoking I put the remaining cigarettes and lighter in on of the drawers of my nightstand. I knew that I should throw them out, had read about how they should be thrown out, but I just put them away in a drawer. I guess at that point I still wasn't certain this quit was going to "take" so wanted to hedge my bets (and besides, the pack was over 1/2 full--that was at least 80 cents I was about to throw away!).

A couple of days later I went in that drawer for something else and did not see the cigs or the lighter so I figured my wife had found them and thrown them away for me or else my stepson had found them and was smoking them himself. This latter thought was not a pretty thought but I wasn't really concerned too much at that point as they appeared to be gone.

Later I was in that drawer again and lo and behold there were the cigs and lighter--they had shifted in the drawer. For a week I left them there. I have had better weeks! Finally, this past week I threw those suckers AWAY and made CERTAIN that the trash man hauled them off! I do feel so much better knowing those things cannot harm me now.

Thanks for giving us the wisdom Joel. Just wish I had followed it a little sooner.

David One month, 8 hours, 12 minutes and 13 seconds. 546 cigarettes not smoked, saving $40.96. Life saved: 1 day, 21 hours, 30 minutes.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

31 Dec 2003, 08:26 #40

From: Hillbilly(Gold) (Original Message) Sent: 6/17/2002 4:17 PM
"As long as a person feels like a smoker trying not to smoke, he or she is going to have the psychological problems and play the little mind games of a smoker trying not to smoke. When you cross over to the frame of mind that you are not a smoker trying not to smoke but rather you are now an ex-smoker--and that is what you want to be--the psychological benefit can be both powerful and profound."

The above is an excerpt from Message No. 35 in the thread Carrying Cigarettes. I read it for the first time today, and have not seen that teaching concept anywhere else in Freedom. It really got my attention.

For two months now, I have been successful in my quit by telling myself that "I am not going to smoke, just for today. I may smoke tomorrow, but today I'm not going to smoke."

Lately I have not had to argue with myself each morning about this decision, and it has become much less important to me. What I am trying to say is my mindset is changing, and I begin to look more at the long range picture of not smoking for the rest of my life. That idea has been particularly scary to me, but I have to accept that my baby steps are getting bigger.

This post that I quoted above really affected me. I have been thinking of myself as a smoker who is trying to quit. I now begin to realize that is time to begin thinking of myself as an ex-smoker. This is a major step for me and I wonder if anyone else has been through a similar experience.

The one thing I don't need to forget is the fact that I will never be an ex-addict.

Dave

I have chosen not to smoke for 1 Month 4 Weeks 2 Days 18 Hours 12 Minutes 46 Seconds. Somewhere there are 2126 extra cigarettes.

From Dave's Original Post in ...
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