Carrying Cigarettes

Christy xs
Christy xs

July 7th, 2004, 11:15 pm #41

Relating to this article, I have been amused by the "helpful" insights of the well-intentioned people around me who have offered me advise on my quit.
A few examples of some recent conversations:
At work, coworker who never smoked before:
Coworker: "Well Chris, maybe what you should do is carry around an unopened pack. Then everytime you have an urge and don't smoke, you'll know you're succeeding at quitting."
My Response: "Bill (not real name), do you know how many quit-smoking experts recommend that strategy?"
Coworker: "No. How many?"
Me: "EXACTLY Zilch, zero, nill, none, nolo! Would you recommend a heroine addict carry around a loaded syringe?"
Coworker: "Ohhh. No. So that wasn't good advise huh?"
Me: "No, but I know you meant well."
At work (2days before my quit), 2 coworkers, ex-smokers successful with NRT's:
Cowkr #1: "Wow Chris, I'm so proud of you for quitting. You'll be so glad you did. Are you going to use the patch or the gum?"
Me: "Neither. I'm addicted to nicotine, so I'm just quitting."
Cowkr #2: "Oh but you need something. I quit with the gum, and so did 'cowkr1'."
Cowkr #1: "Yea, we both quit with the gum. You need it. Of course...I was addicted to the gum for over three years. Didn't think I'd ever stop chewing it."
Cowkr #2: "I know I was on the gum for 6 months, and my wife was addicted to the gum for over a year and a half, and now she's smoking again. Geez, the gum was more expensive than cigarettes!"
Me (listening to the conversation turn into their nic gum addictions): "Well, thanks for supporting me in my quit, but I plan to just quit without nicotine substitutes."
Cowkr #1: "Well I think you'll need the gum to quit."
Me: ...just a smile... "We'll see."
Conversation at my neighborhood pub w/2 patrons:
Patron #1: "So you quit smoking, huh? I quit smoking for 13 years once. Know how I did it? I put a full pack of cigarettes in my coat pocket just in case I HAD to have a cigarette, I wouldn't be a bum. I don't like bums. Carried that pack around for years until one day I needed one. That pack was flat as a playing card. That's how I did it."
Me: "Gee, I don't think I would be enjoying these few days of success I've had with not smoking if I were carrying around a pack.
Patron #2: Looks at Patron #1, "So if you quit smoking for 13 years, why are you smoking now?" Doesn't wait for an answer. "Chris, what you need to do is instead of a pack you should only carry around one or two cigarettes."
Me: Shaking my head. "What are you guys nuts? I am addicted to nicotine. I have quit for 9 days without carrying around a cigarette or a pack, or using the gum, or the patch, or anything. My quit strategy is SET. Thank you both for the suggestions, but you are both smoking and I am not." (I am a little bolder after a couple beers. )
Anyway, I have been mostly amused by these and other well-meant "pearls" of wisdom. Thanks again to WhyQuit and Freedom for the "true pearls" of knowledge.
Cheers ,
Christy
I've not smoked 286 death sticks, and saved $33.28.
I've saved 23 hours and 47 minutes of my life.
Free and Healing for Eleven Days, 10 Hours and 5 Minutes
Last edited by Christy xs on April 8th, 2009, 11:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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zwan girl3
zwan girl3

August 1st, 2004, 2:44 am #42

I do not have the luxury of ridding my home of smoking material, as I live with a heavy smoker. I will tell anyone, that in my opinion, having cigarettes handy, as a stash, or whatever term you choose to fool yourself with, is just plain stupid. Your "junkie" self can be extremely convincing at times, and having your fix readily available is just like signing your own warrant for failure. I'm fully aware that anyone's next puff can be as close as the neighbor's house, but even a buffer like that may be all you need to overcome the urge. I would recommend to any drug addict to rid their home of drugs. Do I feel stronger than others because I have cigarettes available at all times? Not necessarily, but I do feel I have unnecessary stress of looking at my drug constantly.

zwan_girl3
Too educated to take another puff, since July 7, 2004!
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

January 2nd, 2005, 3:55 pm #43

If recovery time distortion is an almost universial recovery symptom and what can feel like a three hour crave episode is never longer than three minutes then why not build in as much delay as your situation will allow?

We understand that many members have family and loved ones who smoke and who'll at times be less than supportive of this wonderful opportunity to substantially improve your health while likely substantially lengthening your life.

But for a recovering nicotine addict to intentionally keep nicotine handy is like someone on suicide-watch intentionally carrying a fully loaded gun, just to prove they can. This isn't time for more head-games but for reason, logic and to replace junkie thinking with the common sense that once filled your mind.
Last edited by John (Gold) on April 8th, 2009, 11:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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MareBear GOLD
MareBear GOLD

March 10th, 2005, 5:45 am #44

For MistyEyed...for the record, I did this one myself and ended up smoking again for another 4 years before finding this site.

MareBear
aka Mary who told you to CYE...I'm rootin' for ya! Also for the record...I've been free from nicotine for: 2 Years 9 Months 1 Week 4 Days 19 Hours. Not smoked: 20316. Money saved: $3,555.30. Life Saved: 2 Months 1 Week 2 Days 13 Hours.
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Joel
Joel

June 6th, 2005, 12:39 am #45

Finding cigarettes

I wrote the below commentary specifically about people offering you cigarettes after you quit. Another similar issue is for people who repeatedly "accidentally" leave their cigarettes in your home, office or car. If this ever happens it is best to destroy the person's cigarettes. Again, the same concept applies--whether you smoke them or destroy them, the cigarettes are no longer going to be available for the person who has carelessly left them behind. The first time if you really feel bad you can reimburse the person the cost of the cigarettes. After that though the person should clearly know not to be so careless with his or her cigarettes.

If ever you have a family member, friend, co-worker or any other acquaintance offer you a cigarette it is best to politely say no and just let the person know that you do not smoke any more nor do you even want to smoke any more. Basically say you have no interest or desire for one. That should be the end of the offers if it is from any person who was just making what he or she thought was a friendly gesture.

If the person pursues asking you about how you quit and why you feel as you do, you may want to take the opportunity to share some of what you learned here about how important quitting smoking is and how much better you feel about yourself since you have quit smoking.

If on the other hand the person continues to offer you a cigarette or is obviously actually pushing you to take one it is best to give it one or two more tries to politely say no and ask the person not to offer any more for you truly have no intention of smoking one. If this doesn't end the pressure being put on you to take a cigarette it is time to change your tactics. Look at the person, maybe even with a little bit of sadness and defeat in your eyes, and say to him or her that you can't take the pressure anymore and sure give me a cigarette if you must. When he or she hands you the cigarette, walk over to the nearest garbage can, crumble it up and throw it out.

Now you have an option of how you want to proceed. You can either wait for the next offer to come or you can say, "Thank you, that felt great. Would you like to give me another one." If the person is gullible enough to offer you another take that one too and repeat the destruction and disposal. Keep it up for as long as the person keeps offering. At some point you may want to say that this could go a whole lot faster if you would like to give me your pack. You can destroy all of the cigarettes that way in one fell swoop.

I can assure you that if you stick to this game plan the person is eventually going to stop offering you cigarettes. Cigarettes are just to expensive to keep up this kind of routine over a long time period. By the way, you should not feel any guilt for destroying the cigarettes of another person. Once a person is offering you a cigarette he or she should not be expecting to get it back. If you smoke the cigarette it is no longer available for the person or if you destroy the cigarette it is no longer available either. If the person is indeed making the offer to somehow give you some sort of pleasure the odds are you will get some sort of pleasure out of destroying them. If not pleasure you should get a little amusement out of the reaction from the person as they see their hard fought efforts to get you to smoke get instantly trashed.

This action will likely result in the other person feeling a whole lot more irritated by the altercation than you will. More importantly though, you will by example be proving to the person and to yourself that your quit is strong and your resolve is totally intact to stick to your personal commitment to never take another puff.

Joel
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Sparky10191
Sparky10191

January 14th, 2006, 12:02 am #46

I can sort of relate. I had been sitting on the side line waiting to start my current quit for the past couple of months. In fact I started my quit quite unexpectedly. I woke up last Sunday morning and told my wife that today was the day. Unfortunately I had a full pack of cigs in my pocket from the night before. I went all Sunday without touching them, and Monday morning before work I put them in the kitchen drawer. Within minutes of getting home from work that evening I yelled to my wife while changing that there was a pack of smokes in the drawer and to hide them from me that night and throw them out the next day. We haven't talked about it since.
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

March 17th, 2006, 11:35 pm #47



From above:
Don't ever forget how cigarettes once controlled your behaviors and beliefs.
When you quit smoking you admitted cigarettes controlled you. You were literally afraid that one puff could put you back. That was not an irrational fear.
One puff today will lead to the same tragic results as it would have the day you quit.
Cigarettes were stronger than you before, and, if given the chance, will be stronger than you again. If you want to show you are now in control, do it by admitting you can function without having cigarettes as a worthless and dangerous crutch.
To permanently stay free from cigarettes, all that needs to be done is to NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!
Last edited by Sal GOLD.ffn on April 9th, 2009, 12:14 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Giddy74
Giddy74

May 27th, 2006, 10:40 am #48

Hello all...I am at three weeks today! The thought of carrying, frightens me...I felt so fragile the first couple of weeks (and still do at times). I was cleaning my car and found a pack that had fallen under my seat during my first week. You would have thought I found an illegal substance the way I snatched it up and threw it away so quickly!!!! I was terrified! You know, the "fits" that occur when you go through withdraw? They are intense and it isn't always easy to use your head! My Point in all of this rambling: I cannot imagine thinking I could carry that pack and NOT fail.
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bamagirl1962
bamagirl1962

November 29th, 2006, 2:31 am #49

I must admit...there are still cigarettes in my house. I quit coming back from the Doctor that day (10/30/06) and there is still a pack in the cabinet above my fridge. I know that it's there and sometimes over the past three weekends I have been sorely tempted to open that cabinet. But I haven't.

At this point in my quit, I'm still afraid to open the cabinet, get the pack in my hands and throw them away. I've often thought of asking my boyfriend to do it for me, but I NEED to be able to throw them out myself. To show myself that I am indeed strong enough to touch them and let them go.

I need to do this soon (although I usually forget they are there during the week). I just want to make sure that I'm not alone when I do it...just need the support.

Rhonda - Nicotine free for 4 weeks, 1 days, while extending my life expectancy 2 Days and 12 Hours, by avoiding the use of 723 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $123.13. Quit Date: 10/30/06
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bamagirl1962
bamagirl1962

November 29th, 2006, 9:44 pm #50

Well....I did it! I opened the cabinet, took out my cigarette case, got out the change that was in the front pocket, saw those cigarettes, picked up the unopened pack and took the case and the pack and threw them in the garbage.

It's trash pick up day so they are gone. I feel stronger by the fact that I was able to touch them and not feel like I wanted to smoke. I think I was most afraid of the opened pack, they were just sitting there....but I didn't even consider taking one out.

I'm pretty proud of myself this morning

Rhonda - Nicotine free for 4 weeks, 2 days, while extending my life expectancy 2 Days and 13 Hours, by avoiding the use of 743 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $126.55. Quit Date: 10/30/06
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Nico Free Me
Nico Free Me

January 23rd, 2007, 12:16 am #51

I had to take this a step further. A few days into my quit I found a half pack of cigarettes in the nightstand. It was not enough to just throw them away. It would be too easy to dig them out of the trash. I literally had to destroy each cigarette, and throw the tobacco down the garbage disposal (not the filters) so there was no way they could be salvaged. I thought it would feel sad in a way, but it really felt liberating to do it.
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Joel
Joel

April 3rd, 2007, 11:00 pm #52

I saw the suggestion of using a pencil or pen like a mock cigarette. It reminded me of this comment from above:

Ex-smokers should never carry cigarettes--not from day one of a quit. One reason is for the real risk of smoking it, and the second reason is that as long as a person keeps cigarettes he or she is also keeping a mindset that he or she is a smoker trying not to smoke as opposed to being an ex-smoker. Ex-smokers and never smokers never keep cigarettes--why would they? It serves no purpose to them.
As long as a person feels like a smoker trying not to smoke, he or she is going to have the psychological problems and play the little mind games of a smoker trying not to smoke. When you cross over to the frame of mind that you are not a smoker trying not to smoke but rather you are now an ex-smoker--and that is what you want to be--the psychological benefit can be both powerful and profound.

If you work on proper frame of mind in the beginning, you can feel this difference a minute into your quit and you will prove yourself right as long as you always remember that you are committed to never take another puff!

Joel
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sintehdarock
sintehdarock

August 31st, 2007, 12:50 am #53

O.K. It is a done deal. I just took a leap of blind faith , and trusting in your take on things , I threw out the 3 opened bags of TOP that I have been keeping...emptying them first .
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sandinbetweentoes
sandinbetweentoes

November 10th, 2007, 12:16 am #54

I quit on Oct. 15th 2007 while walking a mile or so up to the store after I just had a ciggarette. I knew I needed to quit! I knew that this was killing me internally, externally and it will only get worse. I took the pack of ciggarettes and stated 3 emotional reasons to why I wanted to rid the habit for good this time and threw them down on the ground with all my might and kept on walking. I felt so good about myself and my choice. Although quitting has been difficult when out in social situations involving drinking, the more you do it without smoking the easier it gets. I could never hold onto a pack of cigarettes - those are what you want to get away from! It's weird because in my last quit attempts I felt that life was doomed without cigarettes-no fun, etc... but now I feel that life is really, in fact the same, you just do not smoke. If anything it actually enhances your current experiences by not smoking and going thru withdrawel and also boosts self esteem knowing that you are getting healthier each day, and you are definitely going to have a better future!
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Judykay0
Judykay0

January 7th, 2008, 1:42 pm #55

When I stopped smoking, I had one new pack. My son drew a face on it with markers. I gave the pack a name. In the first week, I had some "serious" talks with that pack of cigarettes about how horrible it was making my life. I know that seems silly, but i was having a debate with myself. Which seemed to be the case in the second week as well. I planned on throwing that pack away on new years eve, but I still didn't do it. I was playing a "game" with myself, because I still couldn't really believe that I was a NON smoker.
I took those cigarettes and I put them in a bowl, wet them, and threw them away.
It seems so stupid now to have kept that pack of cigarettes. I was doing just as you said. I was telling myself that I was "better" or "stronger" than they were. I was having a "arguement" with those cigarettes.
I am happy to say that I threw them out of my house today.
Such ends the fight.
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

January 7th, 2008, 10:44 pm #56

Judy, it's all too common that the rational, thinking mind resorts to games, challenges, tests, personification and bizarre rituals when attempting to arrest a chemical dependency, a dependency that long ago took hostage the priority teaching pathways of the deep inner primitive mind. But such games are like holding a chicken bone too close to a dog's mouth. Why would superior intelligence intentionally tease a brain into experiencing powerful craves that it knew or should have known were coming?

Keeping the instrument of relapse handy may be associated with a host of mind games including a tangible attempt to display self control or raw power, an intentional self-tease, an already defeated mind's access insurance for when challenge becomes significant, or even what sounds like a rational attempt to extinguish, early, one of the biggest conditioned feeding cues of all, being around cigarettes.

We are told that early alcohol use is associated with 50% of all relapses but even louder is the fact that 100% of relapses involve the addict getting their hands on nicotine. Although time distortion may make a less than three minute crave episode feel like three hours, if we have the ability to put a few minutes between us and obtaining nicotine, we afford the rational, thinking mind an opportunity to sense the turmoil begin to subside, and keep healing, freedom and recovery alive.

There will be plenty of time later for all the mind games you then want to play (if any) and they'll each be super easy to win. You'll no longer be in the throws of chemical withdrawal, the vast majority of your nicotine feeding cues will have been extinguished, and your deep inner brain will have been afforded an opportunity to taste the true beauty and flavor of life without nicotine, and sense the inner calm of coming home to you!

Thirty years of my own bondage, and up to 3 packs-a-day, as part of my cessation seminars I'm often handling cigarettes. If you're thinking about quitting or a new quitter, I wish you could peak inside my mind and feel what it's like to go program after program and yet never once want for nicotine. Give yourself time. You'll be amazed at how comfortable and content you'll become, even around smokers.

All we can control are the next few minutes and whether the calmest yet or our greatest challenge of all during this temporary period of re-adjustment called quitting, each will be entirely do-able. You're coming home! Yes you can, yes you have, yes you are!

Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,

John (Gold x8)
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starbirder.ffn
starbirder.ffn

March 25th, 2008, 1:42 am #57

A good read to continue our education....

Star After 40+ years, Free and Healing and Choosing Not To Use nicotine for over 8 months.....
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hwc5
hwc5

March 25th, 2008, 3:53 am #58

I threw out my cigarettes on day three. Up to that point, I had stopped smoking without really planning to quit. Sick with the flu. Felt horrible to smoke, so I went one day. Then, I tried for a second day. Still, I was just testing the waters. After three days without a cigarette, my mindset completely changed...just as Joel describes. After having made it through three days without nicotine (for the first time in 35+ years), I decided to take advantage of the opportunity to become an ex-smoker.

It was then that I committed to never taking another puff. It was also then that I realized I could live without cigarettes on hand and that those cigarettes would be a very dangerous temptation at some point. Better to have to get in the car and go buy a pack to give into an urge. Build in a little hurdle to a careless relapse.

So I took the two packs I had bought the day before I quit, walked out to the garage, and tossed them in the garbage can. Definitely a point of no return.

I totally understand Joel's advice. I found an (empty) cigarette pack in the center console of my car yesterday (six weeks into my quit). I don't want the temptation.
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Gump19690
Gump19690

May 2nd, 2008, 8:40 am #59

Don't ever forget how cigarettes once controlled your behaviors and beliefs. When you quit smoking you admitted cigarettes controlled you. You were literally afraid that one puff could put you back. That was not an irrational fear. One puff today will lead to the same tragic results as it would have the day you quit. Cigarettes were stronger than you before, and, if given the chance, will be stronger than you again. If you want to show you are now in control, do it by admitting you can function without having cigarettes as a worthless and dangerous crutch. To permanently stay free from cigarettes, all that needs to be done is to NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF.

Dont underestimate this one...just do it.
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Joel
Joel

June 24th, 2008, 2:59 am #60

We put out guidelines that enhance an individual's chance of success. Some people may get by with doing things differently, but they often had put themselves at greater risk than should have been necessary. In clinics I sometimes find out people had kept emergency stashes, some for years, yet got away with it and pulled off the quit. But I encounter many more people who lose their quits early on, and when I ask where they got the first cigarette from it turns out that they had kept an emergency stash "just in case." Well just in case kind of events surfaced and the easy availability ended up costing these people their quits. I have been in this field long enough to witness these people later losing their lives from such actions.

So does everyone have to follow everything we say to guarantee success? No, not really. But do people have a better chance following the advice and life lessons of hundreds or thousands of people as opposed to a few exceptions? I will let each and every one of you be the judge of that.

But one rule has no exceptions-the rule that says to stay smoke free and guarantee that this quit the last quit you will ever have to do requires always remembering to never take another puff!

Video version of this string
Title Dialup video Highspeed video MP3 Audio 08:18 09/28/06
Carrying cigarettes 1.85mb 5.70mb 3.02mb 06:39 10/17/06
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hwc
hwc

April 11th, 2009, 2:00 am #61

Joel bumped this thread to the top a couple days into my quit when I still had two unsmoked packs of cigarettes in the kitchen cabinet (I had quit totally spur of the moment, in fact, just an hour after a smoke run to buy cigarettes). I kind of pooh-poohed the suggestions that it was a bad idea, after all I was proving I was stronger. Until about day five or so when I found my mind visualizing those cigarettes. I could picture the pack, upper right side of the top shelf of the cabinet to the left of the sink. Right next to the first aid kit, the headache pills, and the eyeglass wipes. After a few minutes of that visualization getting stronger, I knew Joel was right. This was a very, very dangerous situation. I went straight to the kitchen, destroyed both packs, and threw them in the garbage.

------

I have to laugh at the description of unconsiously reaching into a shirt pocket for cigarettes. My funniest "first time trigger" was at the four month mark. I was a totally comfortable ex-smoker at that point. I did back to back seven hour car rides -- one solo -- without a single thought of smoking. Then, one day, I went clothes shopping. After an hour or so in the store, I walked out and, before I had even gotten to the curb, I noticed that my hand, like Dr. Strangelove, had gone to my shirt pocket to get the cigarettes. I burst out laughing. Of course. For my entire adult life, the first thing I did after an hour cooped up in a clothing store was desperately reach for a nicotine fix. This was humorous. I didn't really want to smoke. It was just a trained response. But, what if I had actually had a pack of cigarettes in my shirt pocket?
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FreedomNicotine
FreedomNicotine

November 6th, 2009, 11:50 pm #62

I thought it would be a good time to point out that we really are different than most other boards out there. I am not saying it is better or worse, just different. People come in here that have often been at other boards first where the rule of the day is everyone has good ideas of how to quit. The fact is, many people come with their old techniques and understanding of how to quit. That is why many if them are current smokers. Their old techniques failed them. We on the other hand are trying to share methods ands approaches that are tried and true. Not methods that one person used and it seemed to work for them, but that you can find dozens of people who used the exact same method only to have it basically undercut their quits. We are trying to highlight the methods that enhances the vast majority of members and even ex-smoking non-members overall success.

It is not that we are not against newbies offering support, but just that they should hang around a while first, read all of our philosophies and try to understand what we are doing here and why we have some of our guidelines in place.

If a person has a difference of opinion with our technique, which is basically quit cold turkey, don't carry cigarettes and never take another puff, they should not post about it on the board. If they want to discuss it with management, we can each be emailed and we will explain why we don't advocate a specific piece of advice. Or maybe we will see your point and modify our approach.

But if a new member reads it in their first days of a quit, before we have a chance to point out the pitfalls, they may think that this advice is accepted strategy for enhancing smoking cessation. The fact is for most people, if the advice in contradictory to our basic premise, it is probably going to be counterproductive to the person's quit. People just quitting who are hanging on for dear life will often grasp onto things that are written in our posts and responses. The addiction would love to get some support from a basically bad piece of advice that makes the potential for relapsing seem a bit easier.

Also, we need to keep focused on the real danger of the buddy system. The buddy may have the best advice in the world, and the other buddy may really count on the person to get them through thick and thin. But there is no guarantee that the buddy will be available when needed or worst, there is no guarantee that the buddy won't be a smoker next time contacted. Stranger things have happened.

Count on yourself first. You can count to some degree on the group after that, but there have even been times where due to technical difficulties the whole group disappears all at once. Again, that is where counting on yourself is paramount. Print out your own reasons for having initially quit. Print out materials here that struck a personal chord helping you at a critical moment. Have alternative resources of support established. But don't count on one individual, no matter who they are. The stakes are too high to gamble on one person helping you when he or she may not be able to do this for him or herself.

Joel
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rosy
rosy

November 7th, 2009, 9:40 am #63

The first time that I ever thought that stopping smoking was a realistic option, happened two years ago when I found a book at a second hand bookshop on how to stop smoking.

Some of the wisdom found on our site is also in the book - take it one day at time, etc.

However, a key to quitting from the books author's perspective was that it was essential to always keep your usual pack of cigarettes with you.

The logic was that by not having it available, it brings on a sense of deprivation (and even a sense of rebellion and we smokers are experts at being rebellious!) - and when one cant have something, you want it even more. So differently to the macho arguments of being "stronger than the cigarette" this was saying accept the addiction, keep the cig with you.

Needless to say I didn't manage one day quit - instead this method saved me the hassle of having to bum a cigarette!


I am thankful to this book as it was the start of giving me hope that perhaps I too can find a way to stop smoking. From there I explored other alternatives until I came home to Freedom.

I was beginning to despair that I would be the last smoker on earth still smoking to the bitter end.

Free & Healing
Rosy
Stopped Smoking for Twenty Eight Days, 17 Hours and 38 Minutes, by avoiding the use of 948 nicotine delivery devices. Quit Day : 09/10/2009.
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Joined: November 11th, 2008, 7:22 pm

December 12th, 2009, 3:02 pm #64

Joel's carrying cigarettes article teaches that commencing recovery with the belief that we are stronger than our addiction or that we need cigarettes present to cope is self defeating and a recipe for relapse. Now there's new study evidence that having cigarettes available may actually make cravings more intense. The study concluded that:
"The data suggest that, even under conditions of immediate cigarette availability, deprivation and cue presentations have independent, additive effects on self-reported craving levels in smokers."

The impact of cigarette deprivation and cigarette availability on cue-reactivity in smokers
Addiction. November 17, 2009 Nov 17.
Bailey SR, Goedeker KC, Tiffany ST.
According to the study, "As has been found in previous studies, 24 hours of cigarette deprivation produced generalized increases in craving, and immediate cigarette availability boosted craving reactivity to smoking-related cues."
"Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that deprivation and smoking cue presentations have independent, additive effects on craving levels in smokers."

Like dangling candy in front of a child, why intentionally intensify desire anxieties? Physical withdrawal can be accompanied by an underlying current of anxities.

Still just one rule ... no nicotine today!

John (Gold x10)
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FreedomNicotine
FreedomNicotine

January 1st, 2010, 6:33 pm #65

We put out guidelines that enhance an individual's chance of success. Some people may get by with doing things differently, but they often had put themselves at greater risk than should have been necessary. In clinics I sometimes find out people had kept emergency stashes, some for years, yet got away with it and pulled off the quit. But I encounter many more people who lose their quits early on, and when I ask where they got the first cigarette from it turns out that they had kept an emergency stash "just in case." Well just in case kind of events surfaced and the easy availability ended up costing these people their quits. I have been in this field long enough to witness these people later losing their lives from such actions.

So does everyone have to follow everything we say to guarantee success? No, not really. But do people have a better chance following the advice and life lessons of hundreds or thousands of people as opposed to a few exceptions? I will let each and every one of you be the judge of that.

But one rule has no exceptions-the rule that says to stay smoke free and guarantee that this quit the last quit you will ever have to do requires always remembering to never take another puff!


Video version of this string

Title Dialup video Highspeed video MP3 Audio 08:18 09/28/06
Carrying cigarettes 1.85mb 5.70mb 3.02mb 06:39 10/17/06
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