Can we help a person quit when they are pretty sure they don't want to quit?

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

18 Jun 2003, 22:21 #11

One more way you may be able to help someone quit smoking is to email them a link to our new e-book at www.whyquit.com/joel/ntap.pdf.
Reply

John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

15 Feb 2004, 01:18 #12

Whose dreams and desires, yours or theirs?
Don't try and make them live your dream of them quitting.
Help them live their own dream.
Recovery must be for "them" or it's doomed before it starts
Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

17 Sep 2005, 18:59 #13

While your quit is for you and you are the primary benefactor--your quit may be influencing others. This article can help you not take your experience for granted--on what to share with people who may turn to you for help at some point. Continue to prove to yourself that there is life after smoking--and recognize that you are proving to others too that they may be able to get this life too if they just understand the importance of knowing to never take another puff! Joel
Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

28 May 2008, 02:32 #14

Videos related to talking and dealing with others who may still smoke:
Video Title Dial Up High Speed MP3 Audio Length Created
Telling others that you have quit smoking 2.53mb 7.58mb 4.07mb 08:57 10/17/06
Talking to others about not smoking 5.60mb 16.8mb 6.92mb 15:13 11/19/06
Dealing with people who try to undercut your quit 6.52mb 19.5mb 8.05mb 17:42 11/12/06
Reply

JohnPolito
Joined: 11 Nov 2008, 19:22

23 Jul 2010, 12:01 #15

A free full-text copy of the below study is available at this New England Journal of Medicine link.  The study suggests that your success at breaking nicotine's grip upon your life could very well influence friends and loved ones to follow your lead.


The collective dynamics of
smoking in a large social network.

Journal:  New England Journal of Medicine,  May 22, 2008, Volume 358(21), Pages 2249-2258.

Authors:  Christakis NA, Fowler JH.

Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. [url=mailto:christakis@hcp.med.harvard.edu]christakis@hcp.med.harvard.edu[/url]

Comment in:

N Engl J Med. 2008 May 22;358(21):2284-6.

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The prevalence of smoking has decreased substantially in the United States over the past 30 years. We examined the extent of the person-to-person spread of smoking behavior and the extent to which groups of widely connected people quit together.

METHODS: We studied a densely interconnected social network of 12,067 people assessed repeatedly from 1971 to 2003 as part of the Framingham Heart Study. We used network analytic methods and longitudinal statistical models.

RESULTS: Discernible clusters of smokers and nonsmokers were present in the network, and the clusters extended to three degrees of separation. Despite the decrease in smoking in the overall population, the size of the clusters of smokers remained the same across time, suggesting that whole groups of people were quitting in concert. Smokers were also progressively found in the periphery of the social network. Smoking cessation by a spouse decreased a person's chances of smoking by 67% (95% confidence interval [CI], 59 to 73). Smoking cessation by a sibling decreased the chances by 25% (95% CI, 14 to 35). Smoking cessation by a friend decreased the chances by 36% (95% CI, 12 to 55 ). Among persons working in small firms, smoking cessation by a coworker decreased the chances by 34% (95% CI, 5 to 56). Friends with more education influenced one another more than those with less education. These effects were not seen among neighbors in the immediate geographic area.

CONCLUSIONS: Network phenomena appear to be relevant to smoking cessation. Smoking behavior spreads through close and distant social ties, groups of interconnected people stop smoking in concert, and smokers are increasingly marginalized socially. These findings have implications for clinical and public health interventions to reduce and prevent smoking. Copyright 2008 Massachusetts Medical Society.

PMID: 18499567

PubMed Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18499567
Reply

Joel Spitzer
Joined: 13 Nov 2008, 14:04

16 Aug 2012, 15:47 #16

New videos related to helping others

Last edited by Joel Spitzer on 16 Aug 2012, 16:26, edited 2 times in total.
Reply