Can't catch my breath

Can't catch my breath

tex061355
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

25 Jan 2007, 21:31 #1

Good morning from Texas y'all. Today is my 3 week anniversary. I woke up with a very positive attitude. However, when I got out of the shower I couldn't catch my breath. Seriously, it's like that excercise when you take a deep breath and hold it, take another and hold it and yet another. Also at night I have been getting heartburn pretty bad. Kinda scary. Here it is 3 hours later and I still feel like I can't get enough air. I feel good and have a great attitude today, but is this normal?

I have a physical scheduled for March and I'm afraid he'll find the beginning of empysema. Are these typical for a body to be without nicotine? Y'all have been great and I get a lot out of all the articles that you send. If any one can shed light on this let me know.

Relaxed and growing healthier everyday in Texas. Bob
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

25 Jan 2007, 21:57 #2

Contact your doctor and tell him of your current symptoms. These are not the kind of symptoms that should be simply written off to not smoking and put off to get checking out until March.

Related comments in other strings:

Life goes on without smoking
It is important for all people who quit smoking to recognize that life goes on without smoking. Over time after a person quits smoking there will be changes: medical, psychological, professional, economic, life roles, relationships, etc. What is important to recognize though is that most of these changes would have occurred whether you had quit smoking or not or even whether or not you ever smoked. As many of my friends are now in their mid-forties and fifties, it is amazing how we share stories of new ailments and new medications being introduced into our lives. Some of these people had quit smoking decades ago, some of them never smoked. None of the ex-smokers bring up a new disorder and say or think to themselves that it must be happening now because they quit smoking ten or twenty years ago. It would be like a person who never smoked who finds out they now have high blood pressure and then thinks to him or herself that it must be because he or she stopped using some product twenty years ago. As we age things happen-it is just the way things go.

If a person gets diagnosed with a smoking related ailment like emphysema or lung cancer years or decades after quitting it is likely that their mind is shifted to think about their past smoking. But medical and psychological conditions that are experienced by smokers and non-smokers alike, the concept of smoking or quitting should not be considered a primary focus anymore.

Smoking did not cause everything. It causes a whole lot of things though and many things that it does not cause, it makes worse. On the same token, quitting does not cause everything. Quitting is usually accompanied with many repairs, but there are also some adjustments (see Medication adjustments) that go on that may need a partnership with your physicians to get worked out.

My general rule of advice is whatever happens the first few days of a quit, whether it is physical or psychological reactions, blame it on not smoking. It is probably the cause of most early quit reactions. If it is a symptom to a condition that could be life threatening, such as severe chest pains or signs or symptoms of a stroke-contact your doctor immediately. While it is probably nothing and just a side effect of quitting, in the long shot that it is something else coincidentally happening the week you are quitting, you need to get it checked out.

Things happening weeks, months, years or decades after your quits though should not ever be assumed to be a quit smoking reaction. It is life going on without smoking. Some of these things may trigger smoking thoughts-especially if they are similar to conditions you did have in the past when you were a smoker. The situation now is a first time experience with a prior feeling where smoking was integrates thus creating smoking thoughts. But even in this case, the condition is creating a smoking thought, it is not that your smoking memories or your smoking past is creating the condition.

Life goes on without smoking. It is likely to go on longer and it is likely that you will be healthier at each and every stage than you would have been if you had continued smoking. Your life will continue to stay better and likely last long longer as long as you always remember to never take another puff!

Joel




For people who are off for weeks, months, years or decades and who are cranky, nervous, depressed, angry, have sore throats, heart burn, ear aches, backaches, headaches, eye strains, poor vision, hearing problems, broken bones, have stubbed their toes, have financial concerns, job stresses, or any other extraordinary issues going on in their lives at the moment. Don't blame every feeling, bad or good in your life on the fact that you happened to have quit smoking. Life goes on without smoking and as the closing paragraph in this article states:

Life goes on without smoking. It is likely to go on longer and it is likely that you will be healthier at each and every stage than you would have been if you had continued smoking. Your life will continue to stay better and likely last long longer as long as you always remember to never take another puff!


"Is anyone else experiencing the symptom of...?"

Every now and then a person will experience a specific symptom and put up a post asking whether or not the symptom is one that is normally experienced by people who have quit smoking and if others here had experienced the same symptom when they had quit. As far as if a specific symptom is one that "can" occur after cessation, we have put together a pretty inclusive string titled Possible Withdrawal Symptoms.

As far as whether or not another member or numerous members experienced the same symptom, it does not really make a difference if they had or had not. It is like someone writing and saying that he or she is having a tingling sensation in his or her arm and wondering if anyone else experienced the same symptom when they quit. Then a person who had slept on his or her arm one night when quitting smoking and woke up with that particular arm tingling writes back and says that sure enough, he or she had a tingling arm the week he or she had quit. Now the recent quitter feels a sense of relief because he or she has seen that one other person had the same symptom. So the person does nothing.

The problem was that the person who wrote the question was not having tingling from having slept on his or her arm, but rather, was experiencing a symptom of a heart attack that he was now ignoring. This action could result in a fatal mistake of not seeking what was immediately needed medical attention.

Read the posts Giving and getting medical advice online., Possible Withdrawal Symptoms, and Life goes on without smoking. If you have a concern of a symptom that you are experiencing consult your personal doctor. We say it often here, that the only medical advice that we can give is that to reduce your risk of a host of illnesses and conditions is to stick to your commitment to never take another puff!

Joel



Giving and getting medical advice online.

Related videos:
"Is this a symptom of quitting smoking?" Dial Up
1.91mb
HS/BB
18.9mb
Audio
0.77mb
Length
05:13
09/27/06
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Chipits GOLD.ffn
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

26 Jan 2007, 00:50 #3

Image
HI TEX, WELCOME TO FREEDOM!
Congratulations on your 3 week quit!! Know that you are on a healing journey to the best wellness you can attain by not ever ingesting nicotine again!!! Keep on absorbing all the information you can, because an educated quit is power to overcome this addiction...I can't find the thread/article link at the moment where I got the following information here in whyquit (so since I had put it in MS Word), so I will just post it for you......Having had asthma and allergies for most of my life, this article was an eye opener for me to know why I could smoke and still breathe, even tho' I was taking meds for asthma and even using them to help me breathe better so I could smoke....(what a vicious and deadly circle)...Wheezing and chest tightness can be caused by so many things......As Joel says above, go see your doc and make sure you read the highlighted posts he has provided....and as all of us know>>>>Never TAke Another Puff<<<<
3.4.3 COCOA AND THEOBROMINE
Widely used as an additive [in tobacco], cocoa contains alkaloids, which may modify the effects of nicotine and have a pharmacological effect in themselves. Cocoa also contains about 1% theobromine, a 'bronchodilator' - encouraging expansion of the airways and facilitating increased smoke and nicotine intake.
The following quotes are from scientific and medical papers held by Philip Morris:
"Theobromine: The principal alkaloid of the cocoa bean which contains 1.5-3% of the base... bronchodilation effect in asthma."51
"The bronchodilator effect of a 10mg dose of theobromine was compared with that of 5mg of theophylline in young patients with asthma.... In this single dose study the bronchodilatory effect produced by theobromine was clinically and statistically significant.... improvement in all pulmonary function tests was noted after the ingestion of theobromine or theophylline."52 The addiction of these chemicals, in many cases, may mask an underlying problem when smoking. Stop smoking and take away these additives and a person who does not know he has asthma or emphsema or other symptoms of COPD is at once faced with a difficulty breathing from lack of broncodiators. Of course keep on smoking and you're liable to end up with MUCH MUCH WORSE..

3.4.4 GLYCYRRHIZIN
An ingredient of LICORICE - another commonly used additive, glycyrrhizin also acts as a bronchodilator.
"What does a bronchodilator do? The bronchodilator makes it easier for you to inhale, so obviously if you are having difficulty putting smoke in your lungs, it's good to have a bronchodilator in there. Now I was asked recently whether I knew whether the glycerizon being delivered is delivered in adequate concentration to cause that to happen. I do not know the answer to that question. It would be interesting to know whether that has been studied by the industry. If they have studied it, it would seem that that is the kind of information that should be shared with regard to ingredients. The point is, however, that we know it can happen, it is a bronchodilator. The probability that it happens is very high, but that would be related to studies that should be done."53 (Farone WA 1997)
Wendy --Image--free and healing for 6m 18d
Randy --Image--free and healing for 2m 9d
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Chipits GOLD.ffn
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

26 Jan 2007, 00:56 #4

Image Actually, the information on bronchodilators in tobacco was under my nose all the time....on the board today too under this title >>> Cigarette Smoke Smell Good? It's not by accident.......

wendy---6m 18d
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iwannalive
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

30 Jan 2008, 05:16 #5

This message has been deleted by the manager or assistant manager.
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iwannalive
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

30 Jan 2008, 05:17 #6

This message has been deleted by the manager or assistant manager.
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JoeJFree Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

30 Jan 2008, 05:59 #7

Tex's post is a YEAR old now.

Tex is finer than frog's hair by now. Matter of fact he was fine not long after he posted this note.
He recently came back and celebrated his Golden achievement in this post - Thanks to everyone.

Here's a good story for the newly arrived folks to share. Texas Newbie.
Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

30 Jan 2008, 06:07 #8

Thanks for catching the date issue Joe. I misread the date and thought it was from a few days ago. I literally had sent a note to the managers saying that the posts added today should be deleted, even when I thought it was a few days old, let alone a year old.

One person telling a person who is having chest pains or difficulty breathing that it happened to them and turned out to be fine can easily cause the person experiencing the symptoms now to write it off to quitting smoking and hold off on seeking medical attention. This is basically a form of giving medical medical advice and bad medical advice at that.

As I put in the string a year ago:

...It is like someone writing and saying that he or she is having a tingling sensation in his or her arm and wondering if anyone else experienced the same symptom when they quit. Then a person who had slept on his or her arm one night when quitting smoking and woke up with that particular arm tingling writes back and says that sure enough, he or she had a tingling arm the week he or she had quit. Now the recent quitter feels a sense of relief because he or she has seen that one other person had the same symptom. So the person does nothing.

The problem was that the person who wrote the question was not having tingling from having slept on his or her arm, but rather, was experiencing a symptom of a heart attack that he was now ignoring. This action could result in a fatal mistake of not seeking what was immediately needed medical attention.

Read the posts Giving and getting medical advice online., Possible Withdrawal Symptoms, and Life goes on without smoking. If you have a concern of a symptom that you are experiencing consult your personal doctor. We say it often here, that the only medical advice that we can give is that to reduce your risk of a host of illnesses and conditions is to stick to your commitment to never take another puff!

Joel


Giving and getting medical advice online.
Reply