Call Me A Quitter

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

22 Jul 2004, 23:50 #26

From: Joel. Sent: 9/26/2002 7:51 AM
I saw a discussion up today about people not seeming to know who they are since they quit smoking. It is true that most smokers do not know what it is like to be an adult without cigarettes--they took up cigarettes in their childhood or adolescents, and had cigarettes incorporated into many of their adult thoughts, rituals, and daily practices. They may never have drove to a job in their life without a cigarette. They may never have gone on a job interview without a cigarette. They may never have gone out on their own to buy a home without a cigarette. Cigarettes became a constant companion.

But once a person quits he or she will quickly learn who he or she is without smoking. The truth be known, the ex-smoker is now the real person that he or she was always meant to be. So many adult decisions and lifestyle adjustments were designed to accommodate smoking. Yes the person may have established a successful existence, but cigarettes still may have held him or her back from reaching his or her maximum potential--not to mention his or her maximum life expectancy.

To find out who you really are and to have more time to spend with that person always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

14 Apr 2005, 11:01 #27

For Carroll / freeforlife46,
Just know that you should substitute compulsive behavior or conditioned response for the word habit. Cause we all know our thinking it was just a "Nasty Little Habit" helped to keep us trapped and not able acknowledge our addiction to nicotine.
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on 14 Apr 2009, 04:53, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

11 Jun 2005, 19:02 #28

From above: John was in pretty poor health when he joined up. He really felt it was probably too late when he quit. But as you can see 12 years later he is still alive and well.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

22 Apr 2006, 04:27 #29

But once a person quits he or she will quickly learn who he or she is without smoking. The truth be known, the ex-smoker is now the real person that he or she was always meant to be. So many adult decisions and lifestyle adjustments were designed to accommodate smoking. Yes the person may have established a successful existence, but cigarettes still may have held him or her back from reaching his or her maximum potential--not to mention his or her maximum life expectancy.

To find out who you really are and to have more time to spend with that person always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

23 Nov 2006, 21:36 #30

From above:

I saw a discussion up today about people not seeming to know who they are since they quit smoking. It is true that most smokers do not know what it is like to be an adult without cigarettes--they took up cigarettes in their childhood or adolescents, and had cigarettes incorporated into many of their adult thoughts, rituals, and daily practices. They may never have drove to a job in their life without a cigarette. They may never have gone on a job interview without a cigarette. They may never have gone out on their own to buy a home without a cigarette. Cigarettes became a constant companion.

But once a person quits he or she will quickly learn who he or she is without smoking. The truth be known, the ex-smoker is now the real person that he or she was always meant to be. So many adult decisions and lifestyle adjustments were designed to accommodate smoking. Yes the person may have established a successful existence, but cigarettes still may have held him or her back from reaching his or her maximum potential--not to mention his or her maximum life expectancy.

To find out who you really are and to have more time to spend with that person always remember to never take another puff!

Joel


Also, if you want to get a real sense of the actual program John went through, these indexes will help:

Using these videos to quit smoking
Starting day one of your quit
Starting day two of your quit
Starting day three of your quit
Starting day four of your quit
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Joined: 13 Nov 2008, 14:04

21 Aug 2014, 12:54 #31

I haven't popped this one up for several years. What made me think of it today is I got an email from another one of my clinic panelists who I have not heard from in probably over 14 years. He was just writing me to tell me that today was his 30th anniversary since having quit smoking. If I remember correctly, Barry was a four pack a day smoker. His entire group was watching him from day one believing that he was going to either crack or experience the worst withdrawal of any one in his group. His experience was quite a bit different though--he simply said to a member of his family that he was quitting smoking and asked him to clear out all of his ashtrays, which I believe he had over 40 strewn throughout the house. He proceeded to quit and experienced minimal side effects. He shocked everyone who knew him. Fits under the concepts covered in the video Amount smoked.

So just taking this opportunity to say congratulations to Barry for being smoke free for 30 years. 


The way for all of our current members and readers to accomplish the same goal is still by a day at a time sticking to your own personal commitment to never take another puff.


Joel


 
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Joined: 26 Apr 2014, 21:45

21 Aug 2014, 14:08 #32

Way to go, Barry! 

And Joel, having a 30 year quitter from your classes... ??? Just wow! I'm hoping I make it to say Freedom was my key to success 30(!!!) years ago!

~ Christy
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Joined: 13 Nov 2008, 14:04

22 Aug 2014, 17:49 #33

I just had a short phone conversation with Barry. I needed to fact check something I had written--about him having over 40 ashtrays throughout the house. The actual count was 52. 

New video discussing Barry: A thirty year success story






Related video: Amount smoked
Last edited by Joel Spitzer on 22 Aug 2014, 20:05, edited 1 time in total.
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