Call Me A Quitter

DubiouslyDos
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

30 Jul 2002, 23:50 #21

I really appreciate seeing this today - my grandfather Charlie started smoking when he was 9 and got up to 3-4 packs daily, as did this gentleman. He passed away at home when he was only 66. What idiots we all were to feel relief that it was his heart, and not cancer that ended his life. We were thankful he ended peacefully because he was coughing so much.

For years I used his death as an example that a smoker does not only die of cancer - what a messed up way to think. When I met rude non-smokers who confronted me with the possiblity of quiting - I called it "slow suicide" with a smile on my face. Sick now to think of how messed up that was or to imagine how horrified the person who confronted me must have been by my response. Too bad cigarette manufactures don't put true life stories on their packs - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!

Dos (Dubious)
9 Weeks 51 Minutes
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

26 Sep 2002, 21:51 #22

Image I saw a discussion up today about people not seeming to know who they are since they quit smoking. It is true that most smokers do not know what it is like to be an adult without cigarettes--they took up cigarettes in their childhood or adolescents, and had cigarettes incorporated into many of their adult thoughts, rituals, and daily practices. They may never have drove to a job in their life without a cigarette. They may never have gone on a job interview without a cigarette. They may never have gone out on their own to buy a home without a cigarette. Cigarettes became a constant companion.

But once a person quits he or she will quickly learn who he or she is without smoking. The truth be known, the ex-smoker is now the real person that he or she was always meant to be. So many adult decisions and lifestyle adjustments were designed to accommodate smoking. Yes the person may have established a successful existence, but cigarettes still may have held him or her back from reaching his or her maximum potential--not to mention his or her maximum life expectancy.

To find out who you really are and to have more time to spend with that person always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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MsArmstrongKIS
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

06 May 2003, 00:33 #23

Thanks so much, Joel! I hope I'm still excited and proud about never taking another puff many decades from now! I hope I always see it as a major accomplishment of my life, something still worthy of guarding carefully and smiling about. I hope I never look back on all of this work I did educating myself as just a fad, and I love seeing and hearing about proof that it can be done, and that others have gone the path that I hope for myself.

Alex
2 months 3 weeks
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

27 Jun 2003, 18:14 #24

This letter illustrates how even people who were once die hard smokers, people who thought they could never quit, can actually quit smoking and stay off over the long haul. It simply comes to a point where a person must recognize that quitting smoking is a fight for ones life and that to win that fight is as simple as just knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

15 Sep 2003, 06:21 #25

Image Even people who are sure they are "hopelessly addicted" can succeed over the long-term. It takes the realization that they are indeed addicted but taking control over the addiction is not a hopeless venture. Quitting is possible and staying free is doable for any person as long as he or she understands that to stay smoke free is as simple as sticking to his or her commitment to never take another puff! Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

22 Jul 2004, 23:50 #26

From: Joel. Sent: 9/26/2002 7:51 AM
Image I saw a discussion up today about people not seeming to know who they are since they quit smoking. It is true that most smokers do not know what it is like to be an adult without cigarettes--they took up cigarettes in their childhood or adolescents, and had cigarettes incorporated into many of their adult thoughts, rituals, and daily practices. They may never have drove to a job in their life without a cigarette. They may never have gone on a job interview without a cigarette. They may never have gone out on their own to buy a home without a cigarette. Cigarettes became a constant companion.

But once a person quits he or she will quickly learn who he or she is without smoking. The truth be known, the ex-smoker is now the real person that he or she was always meant to be. So many adult decisions and lifestyle adjustments were designed to accommodate smoking. Yes the person may have established a successful existence, but cigarettes still may have held him or her back from reaching his or her maximum potential--not to mention his or her maximum life expectancy.

To find out who you really are and to have more time to spend with that person always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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JoeJFree Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

14 Apr 2005, 11:01 #27

Image For Carroll / freeforlife46,
Just know that you should substitute compulsive behavior or conditioned response for the word habit. Cause we all know our thinking it was just a "Nasty Little Habit" helped to keep us trapped and not able acknowledge our addiction to nicotine.
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on 14 Apr 2009, 04:53, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

11 Jun 2005, 19:02 #28

From above: John was in pretty poor health when he joined up. He really felt it was probably too late when he quit. But as you can see 12 years later he is still alive and well.
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JoeJFree Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

22 Apr 2006, 04:27 #29

But once a person quits he or she will quickly learn who he or she is without smoking. The truth be known, the ex-smoker is now the real person that he or she was always meant to be. So many adult decisions and lifestyle adjustments were designed to accommodate smoking. Yes the person may have established a successful existence, but cigarettes still may have held him or her back from reaching his or her maximum potential--not to mention his or her maximum life expectancy.

To find out who you really are and to have more time to spend with that person always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

23 Nov 2006, 21:36 #30

From above:

I saw a discussion up today about people not seeming to know who they are since they quit smoking. It is true that most smokers do not know what it is like to be an adult without cigarettes--they took up cigarettes in their childhood or adolescents, and had cigarettes incorporated into many of their adult thoughts, rituals, and daily practices. They may never have drove to a job in their life without a cigarette. They may never have gone on a job interview without a cigarette. They may never have gone out on their own to buy a home without a cigarette. Cigarettes became a constant companion.

But once a person quits he or she will quickly learn who he or she is without smoking. The truth be known, the ex-smoker is now the real person that he or she was always meant to be. So many adult decisions and lifestyle adjustments were designed to accommodate smoking. Yes the person may have established a successful existence, but cigarettes still may have held him or her back from reaching his or her maximum potential--not to mention his or her maximum life expectancy.

To find out who you really are and to have more time to spend with that person always remember to never take another puff!

Joel


Also, if you want to get a real sense of the actual program John went through, these indexes will help:

Using these videos to quit smoking
Starting day one of your quit
Starting day two of your quit
Starting day three of your quit
Starting day four of your quit
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