Call Me A Quitter

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

19 Apr 2001, 19:10 #11

For Melissa G:

Melissa wrote that reading people who were off 6 months or more was a real help to keeping her motivation up. Many people find this helpful, to hear the experience of people off a long time. The reason being that many people are skeptical of their chances of long-term success, actually believing that people can't quit for a long time or that if they do, they suffer miserably and feel deprived most of their life. Neither fear is true.

It actually will get to the point that not smoking is a habit, relatively easy in fact and not thought about for most of the time. But even though this is true, not smoking should never be taken for granted. It will get easy to stay off but is also very easy to go back, and may be impossible to quit again in that eventuality.

As far as the possibility of long-term success, in America today we have as many ex-smokers as we do current smokers, around 50 million of each. Half the people who used to smoke have quit illustrating that long-term quitting is possible. All of these ex-smokers will be able to stay that way as long as they all understand once simple concept now. Many of them don't know it yet, so never think it is unnecessary to spread one of the lessons you have all learned here to ex-smokers you know. Most ex-smokers are receptive to your quitting questions and support; they are already on your side. The lesson to share, which not only helps them but also will help you reinforce your quit, is that if they want to remain smoke free, they must always remember to never take another puff!\

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

19 Nov 2001, 19:25 #12

I saw where one of our newest members was writing with great enthusiasm of how much better life was since quitting just two weeks ago, I just thought this one illustrates how some people feel the same enthusiasm for many years if they just keep reminding themselves of what life was truly like when smoking and comparing it to how things improved once they quit. The more accurately you remember what it was like to be a full-fledged smoker with all is expenses, smell, social problems, hassles, and medical risks the more likely you will stay happy and enthused to never take another puff!

Joel
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childofnite GOLD.ffn
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

08 Jan 2002, 03:24 #13

Hmmm... never saw this one before. This guy sure believes in you Joel, as do all of us. Image It's great that people that have been off that long care to come and post, and share their experiences. It's very encouraging.

Now, having said that - EVERYONE reading this should replace the word "HABIT" that was repeatedly used in the course of this letter with "ADDICTION", for that is what it is. VERY IMPORTANT to remember, folks. A person who repetedly uses the word 'habit' instead of 'addiction' is a prime candidate for complacency, and we all know what might happen if we allow ourselves to become too complacent in our quits. Image

In order to avoid relapse, always remember you are an addict, and cannot change the laws of addiction to suit you. One puff is never enough for any addict. Remember also to NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!!!!!!!

Yqs, Diana
5 months, 1 week, 6 days.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

07 Apr 2002, 06:37 #14

I saw where Bill W thought the board had a tone of gloom and doom. Thought I would bring up some posts showing that people can actually be happy and excited to have quit smoking--even years later seeing it as a big deal and a great accomplishment. John here exemplifies this feeling 12 years post quit. You can all achieve the same kind of success as long as you always remember the importance of knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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DebD (GOLD)
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:24

07 Apr 2002, 07:08 #15

Thank you, Joel for posting this! 12 years!! I have difficulty imaging myself at 1month due to past failures but I know I can do this due to the education and support I get here and because I'm taking it one day at a time and will never take another puff! Congrats to the "Quitter"!
Diana, I agree with you re: being addicts but you have to understand 12 years ago, smoking wasn't look at as an addiction, it was only a "HABIT".
Thank you, Joel and everyone for being here for my journey to a new, healthier life. Hope to be around in 12 years to post that I have remained nicotine free and that there won't be any newbies or lurkers to encourage only oldbies keeping in touch! DebD 2wks,3days,5hrs,12min!
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

07 Apr 2002, 08:13 #16

Hello Deb:
I guess I should point out, John in this letter learned that nicotine was an addiction when he was in the clinic 12 years ago. I called it an addiction and treated it as such since 1976. I was just out on a limb and often criticized as being a renegade for making such wild claims. Here is a piece I wrote back in 1982 on the issue. Are you a nicotine junkie?
Prior to 1982 I didn't write much, just lectured live. I started writing the letters in December of 1981 and from the very first letter the concept of addiction was the underlying message--that and the way to stay in control was to know to never take another puff!
Joel
Last edited by Joel on 14 Apr 2009, 04:49, edited 1 time in total.
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DebD (GOLD)
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:24

07 Apr 2002, 13:52 #17

Thank you, Joel!
I just being in my nicotine haze, I've lost track as to how long it's been considered an addiction and not just habit. Thank you, Joel, for the continued education, that is why I am here making this my first and final educated quit because I've learned to take it one day at a time and never take another puff. Also that a dose of nicotine is not going to resolve any problems. All the assistance is much appreciated. DebD
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

07 Apr 2002, 20:27 #18

Hello Deb:

You are not in a haze. I think it's been just about 12 years since they finally categorized nicotine as an addiction. I was just commenting on how when John wrote his original piece, while the scientific community had not yet really accepted the reality that nicotine was an addiction, John himself did. The clinic he was in taught him in no uncertain terms he was an addict.

When it comes down to it though, a high percentage of ex-smokers back then knew they were addicted. They may not have known to use the word addiction, they may not have even been particularly well versed in addiction understanding for other drugs--but they knew for themselves that if they took a puff they would lose their quit. You would often hear people say that there were times that they would kill for a cigarette but that they would not take one--the reason being that they knew if they took one it would be all over for them. These people understood addiction even if they never heard the word. They basically knew without ever reading it that the way to stay free was to never take another puff!
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

18 May 2002, 19:42 #19

You can see from the post above that even after years and decades, the appreciation of being smoke free can still be as important and significant as it is the very first days if you keep remembering where you once were as an actively using nicotine addict and how you never want to be trapped in such an existence again. To avoid chronic withdrawal, further destruction and initiation life threatening illnesses always remember why you originally committed to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

30 Jul 2002, 16:04 #20

Image For Darby:

Just wanted you to know you are not the only one to be happy to be able to call yourself a quitter. John is a quitter for over 13 years now, and is every bit as happy and enthused to be able to use this term about himself today as he was when he first quit. I actually received a lengthy email from him a couple of days ago again expressing his appreciation for having quit and reaffirming his commitment to stay a quitter by always knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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