Blood Sugar Changes When Quitting

JoeJFree Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

08 Feb 2007, 20:25 #21

Ingestion of Nicotine caused our bodies to release adrenaline since it is a central nervous system stimulant, as mentioned in this and other articles by both Joel and John. Lots to learn by reading these existing materials - available to all who seek the truth.
JoeJ Free - Recovered Me Two Years, Twenty Eight Days, 20 Hours and 56 Minutes ago. I've now reclaimed 65 Days and 20 Hours of my life's time, by choosing to not use of 18972 death delivery devices and accumulated $3,915.19 in the 'freedom dividend' account.

Effects of adrenaline
If blood sugar levels are frequently low and our system is regularly being asked to pump out adrenaline then our health will suffer. Adrenaline is the hormone most of us associate with stress - it is released for 'fight or flight' and its effect is very powerful. If you were threatened in the street, for example, or face any kind of physical danger your survival mechanisms would instantly step into action with the adrenal glands immediately producing large amounts of adrenaline.
The effects of adrenaline are
• heart speeds up
• arteries tighten to raise blood pressure - hence a 'beating' heart
• liver immediately releases emergency stores of glucose to give energy
• digestion stops because it is not necessary for immediate survival
• clotting ability of the blood is increased in case of injury.
This all means that you have been made ready to run faster, fight back and generally react more quickly than normal. Unfortunately, when your blood sugar level drops during the day or night, adrenaline is released automatically and the body experiences all the above sensations except that there is no outside stress to respond to. When this happens repeatedly, you can experience all the health problems outlined under the hypoglycaemia section earlier in this chapter. It can also contribute to heart disease by increasing the risk of blood clotting and higher blood pressure and the sudden release of glucose for energy can cause extreme fluctuations of sugar levels in the blood.
These fluctuations in blood sugar create an internal stress which the body then has to deal with. It causes an increase in sodium retention causing a bloated feeling from excess water. The digestive system will not function efficiently and less stomach acid will be produced which means that more food will actually be stored because it has not been digested sufficiently. The longer food stays in the intestines and remains undigested, the more calories are likely to be absorbed. It is therefore important that food is moved quickly out of the intestines.
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jakki8368
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

28 Sep 2007, 04:09 #22

hi

can i just say that i don't think i would have made it through the first 72 hours without the cranbury juice - through reading about the drops in blood sugar levels i could, for the first time, regognise the effects that was having on me and what a difference the cranbury made.

thank you

jakki - Free and Healing for Sixteen Days, 21 Hours and 35 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 1 Day and 18 Hours, by avoiding the use of 507 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me £126.84.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

01 Oct 2007, 02:28 #23

Video Title
Dial-Up
HS/BB
Audio
Length
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Blood sugar symptoms 2.03mb 20.1mb 0.82mb 05:31 09/28/06
Does smoking cause my headaches? 2.69mb 07.4mb 08:32 03/21/07
"Is this a symptom of quitting smoking?" 1.91mb 18.9mb 0.77mb 05:13 09/27/06
Common symptoms 2.18mb 21.6mb 0.88mb 05:55 09/28/06
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

19 Oct 2007, 19:24 #24

Meal pattern, food choice, nutrient intake and lifestyle factors in The Göteborg Adolescence Study.
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 2003 Dec;57(12):1569-78
Sjöberg A, Hallberg L, Höglund D, Hulthén L.
Department of Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Box 459, SE 405 30 Göteborg, Sweden. [url=mailto:agneta.sjoberg@nutrition.gu.se]agneta.sjoberg@nutrition.gu.se[/url]

OBJECTIVE: To relate meal pattern of Swedish adolescents to food choice, nutrient intake and other lifestyle factors.

DESIGN: Cross-sectional study including diet history and interview about smoking, ethnicity, social factors and retrospectively collected data of menarche and growth. SETTING: School setting, Göteborg, Sweden.

SUBJECTS: A total of 611 boys and 634 girls in grade 9 (15-16 y).

RESULTS: The majority of the students, 65% of the boys and 52% of the girls, consumed three main meals daily. The in-between meals, however, contributed the major part of the energy intake. The energy intake was 12.93.5 MJ (means.d.) for boys and 9.02.5 MJ for girls. Irregular breakfast eating, 12% of the boys and 24% of the girls, was related to negative lifestyle factors where smoking was the strongest, odds ratio 3.8 (95% CI: 2.6-5.4) and to irregular intake of lunch and dinner. These boys and girls had a food choice including a higher percentage of energy from snack food (26% vs 20% and 19% in boys and girls respectively, all P<0.001), mostly consumed between the main meals. These groups had significantly lower intakes of micronutrients, but higher intakes of sucrose and alcohol compared to the groups with regular breakfast intake. Girls omitting breakfasts and lunches (8%) also had a less healthy food choice and the poorest nutrient intake. These girls had matured earlier, with menarche age of 12.21.1 y vs 12.91.0 y (P<0.001) in girls with regular main meal intake.

CONCLUSIONS: Meal pattern with omission of breakfast or breakfast and lunch was related to a clustering of less healthy lifestyle factors and food choice leading to a poorer nutrient intake.

SPONSORSHIP: The Swedish Medical Research Council (project B94-19X-04721-19A), the Swedish Mill Industry and the Wilhelm and Martina Lundgren Foundation.

PMID: 14647222 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Source Link
Last edited by John (Gold) on 01 Aug 2009, 12:01, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

02 Jun 2008, 21:30 #25

The effects of cigarette smoking on glycosylated hemoglobin in nondiabetic individuals. The Journal of Family Practice 1989 May;28(5): Pages 529-531. Authors: Urberg M, Shammas R, Rajdev K.

Department of Family Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan.

Cigarette smoking has been causally linked to atherosclerotic heart disease. The mechanism by which cigarette smoking causes heart disease has not, however, been determined. Nicotine has been shown to lead to increases in plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine following smoking. Catecholamines have been shown to lead to increases in blood glucose.

This paper demonstrates that cigarette smoking is associated with increases in average blood glucose as measured by glycosylated hemoglobin levels in smokers compared with nonsmokers.

Fifteen nondiabetic smokers had an average glycosylated hemoglobin of 6.82% (SD = 1.06%), which is higher than the 5.63% (SD = .49%, t = 3.98, P less than .001) found for 23 nonsmokers. The average glycosylated hemoglobin level of the smokers is in the range found for patients with well-controlled diabetes.

These data suggest that elevated blood glucose may contribute to atherogenesis in cigarette smokers.

PMID: 2597247 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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FreedomNicotine
Joined: 06 Dec 2008, 16:58

31 Dec 2009, 18:34 #26

Caffeine tolerance changes after cessation - possible changes :

It is possible that some people's tolerances with caffeine may have fluctuated back and forth over time after quitting. But whether it has happened to one or two other people or not really is not important. All that is important is where your body has adjusted to.



When it comes to caffeine, blood sugar issues, sleep adjustments, and other such issues, it is crucial that everyone learns to recognize his or her owns body needs and requirements after adjusting back to your non-smoking physiology. Again normal is what is normal for your body, not what is normal for the majority of other people who have quit or to other people who might be exceptions to certain rules.



Your body is getting normalized and will stay normalized for you over time as long as you never put it through the abnormal process of nicotine induced pharmacological effects or the nicotine induced withdrawal syndrome by simply knowing now to never take another puff!



Joel



Related readings covering adjustments to your new body after quitting:


Sleep Adjustments
Medication adjustments
Blood Sugar Changes When Quitting
[url=file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/Joel%20Spitzer/My%20Documents/mywebsites/nicotineindex/everyonedifferent.htm]"Everyone is different???"[/url]
Every Quit is Different.

Anyone who feels jittery after a few days of a quit should examine his or her caffeine consumption levels. Many find that they cannot tolerate caffeine consumption at prequit levels. If you are experiencing a jittery feeling you may want to experiment with reducing quantity or strength of caffeinated drinks or products. If you are not having these difficulties it probably is not important to alter anything now.



There is an interaction between nicotine and caffeine, just as there is an interaction with nicotine and alcohol. We discuss it here often how when people drink alcohol it causes them to lose nicotine at an accelerated pace thus resulting in heavier smoking while drinking. As I said, there is a similar situation with nicotine and caffeine--similar with one huge difference. Alcohol makes you lose nicotine, thus is responsible for smoking more when drinking.



Nicotine on the other hand interferes with the body's ability to absorb and utilize caffeine, often resulting in a person who is used to or needs to be maintaining a certain caffeine level requiring more of the products to maintain their minimum needed level. When they quit smoking and consume the same amount, that old quantity will now basically overdose them. In the case where they even increase quantity, they can experience a real overdose effect with the corresponding anxiety and sleep altering effects.



So be careful with caffeine if symptoms are going longer than a few days. It is not saying you need to get rid of it all together, just keep it in doses that don't cause unwanted effects. Your general state will likely be calmer and a feeling of overall well being that you should be able to maintain for the rest of your life as long as you always remember to keep yourself from over stimulating substances and always remember to never take another puff!

Joel

No Adjustment May be Necessary

It isn't necessary to surrender our coffee or anything else when quitting - nor pick up any new crutches either - but due to the 4,000 plus chemicals present in each burning cigarette (and in caffeine's case nicotine), a few intake adjustments may be necessary for some of us and caffeine intake could possibly be one of them.

As indicated in the Swanson study (see study summary below), nicotine accelerates the rate at which caffeine is metabolized by the body. It does so to the extent that if a smoker quits using nicotine and continues to consume the exact same amount of caffeine that they did while using nicotine, that their blood serum caffeine level will double (203%).

The capacity of each of us to handle differing levels of caffeine varies greatly. If you normally drink one or two cups of coffee in succession but know from experience that you can handle three or four without experiencing unwelcomed symptoms - like the jjitters, anxiety, shaking, insomnia, or gastric and digestive disturbances - then no intake adjustment may be necessary.

On the other hand, if during those times when you did double your normal caffeine intake you did notice unwelcomed symptoms then you need to act accordingly so as not to add those symptoms to any associated with nicotine withdrawal.

Look on the bright side - it's cheaper being an ex-smoker because we only require half as much caffeine in order to get the same punch. The next few minutes are doable!

John
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FreedomNicotine
Joined: 06 Dec 2008, 16:58

12 Jun 2010, 11:12 #27

Video Title
Dial-Up
HS/BB
MP3
Length
Added
Blood sugar symptoms 2.03mb 20.1mb 2.51mb 05:31 09/28/06
Does smoking cause my headaches? 2.69mb 07.4mb 3.95mb 08:32 03/21/07
"Is this a symptom of quitting smoking?" 1.91mb 18.9mb 2.36mb 05:13 09/27/06
Common symptoms 2.18mb 21.6mb 2.69mb 05:55 09/28/06
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