MrsO (Double Gold)
MrsO (Double Gold)

March 9th, 2001, 6:47 am #11

When I see someone smoking on the street or in their car - I am always reminded by a poster I believe The American Cancer Society put out years ago. I believe it read "Smoking is Glamorous" and picture a haggard old woman with a sickabutt hanging out of her mouth. NOW ISN'T THAT AN ATTRACTIVE SITE!

My hubby and I are mighty proud today. We are double green! Two months, five days, 4 hours, 44 minutes and 16 seconds. 1814 cigarettes not smoked, saving $244.93. Life saved: 6 days, 7 hours, 10 minutes EACH.

Thanks for being there Freedomites!
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JoyR
JoyR

March 9th, 2001, 7:59 am #12

I remember reading in an article about cigarettes and manufacturers lies, that the cig companies created a special type of filter that when used by humans would deliver more than when used by the government testing machine. It had something to do with an internal structure of the filter and how it would collapse when sucked if not pressed (as by the lips) and the testing machine, while it sucked - did not press. My very convulted point is - while I would love to see the Palmolive demo, it seems possible to me that the reality is even worse.

Joy
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Joel
Joel

March 9th, 2001, 8:20 am #13

The perforated filter is just such a tactic. It **** air in at the same time as a person smokes, in theory. But in practice smokers will learn to seal their lips around the perforations thus rendering it useless. Some people I know had even put tape around the perforations making them easier to inhale. Games people will play. I can compensate for the action with the palmolive bottle. I have the mouth piece designed to be able to go further back if necessary on the cigarette, in essense mimicking what the smoker does. When ever necessary I do it and explain the process to the group. The ones who used the products recognize the practice instantly. It comes down to there is no safe way to smoke, no matter what the package says or any reports say, smoking cigarettes, any cigarettes is dangerous and with time can be deadly. The only safe solution is to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joel

April 10th, 2001, 6:18 am #14

Well for all of you who ever wanted to see the Palmolive bottle demo, here is a picture shot last week at my last stop smoking clinic.



This looks like it was an exhalation after about 10 previous exhalations, not that much is seen in this particular photo. I normally get a tremendous amount of smoke out of the bottle with every drag, normally we can smoke up a room with one cigarette. If you look at the mouthpiece of the bottle, it is almost solid brown with tar. It used to be clear. I have used this bottle with somewhere between 300 and 400 cigarettes. While that may sound like a lot, most people smokemore than that in any given month. Even the bottle is pretty yellow and I blow out almost all of the smoke used when it inhales. The bottle is dry allowing me to do this, your lungs are moist trapping most of the tars when inhaled. Literally over 90% of the tar that is inhaled stays in the lung, when you see a person exhale they are literally blowing out about 10% of the smoke.

When viewed this way, even one puff seems disgusting to most people. Again, the logical conclusion for most is to never take another puff!

Joel
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Debi289(Gold)
Debi289(Gold)

April 10th, 2001, 6:33 am #15

It certainly disgusted me. I guess I never realized how much stayed in our lungs. Thanks for the reinforcement Joel. NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!
Debi289
2M 3W 6D 18h 22m 25s.
Last edited by Debi289(Gold) on November 28th, 2009, 7:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Heike (silver)
Heike (silver)

April 10th, 2001, 6:52 am #16

This reminds me of something I tried once: take a puff and blow it through a paper tissue. held right up against the lips. Do not inhale this puff first. Then inhale another puff and exhale it through the tissue in a different place. Compare the colour of the two stains. Incredible difference. Gives you some indincation how much stuff stayed in the lungs when the smoke was inhaled.

Don't of course try this at home, get a smoker to do it for you!

Heike
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duncan
duncan

April 10th, 2001, 7:16 am #17

Joel - That's really grose man - thanks for the best reminder today - I have been here for two hours this morning, now I am equipped with FREEDOM power to switch off the ocmputer and go and celebrate my partner's birthday - I have only been off the sickerettes for just over a week, after 13 years of smoking - I have coughed up lots of nasty surprises this last week - I dread to think what sort of healing my lungs will have to go through over the next twelve months. NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF DUNCAN !!! One week, one day, 9 hours, 51 minutes and 42 seconds. 210 cigarettes not smoked, saving $74.85. Life saved: 17 hours, 30 minutes.
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Triin (GOLD)
Triin (GOLD)

April 10th, 2001, 8:05 am #18

Yak!!! I'm suprised the smokers get any oxygen through this tar that must be in the lungs! I want to breathe, that's why I will never take another puff!

Triin
I have been Quit for: 1M 2W 5D 1h 45m 41s. I have NOT smoked 1001, for a savings of $68.85. Life Saved: 3D 11h 25m.
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Joel
Joel

April 15th, 2001, 7:54 pm #19

Again for those holiday get togethers. Don't sit and fantasize about the joy other people seem to have smoking or worse yet, about the joy smoking would give you at the moment. This again is a fantasy.

If viewed in its actual state, a cigarette will not be a temptation to you. See them for what they are and you will feel no envy toward your smoking family members and friends, but more likely feel a sense of pity for them. You may in fact be helping them by just setting the example of not smoking and not seeming tempted.

If you see cigarettes for what they are this will be the natural state of things, not smoking and not tempted. If you don't see them as they are but rather sit and fantasize about how you wish they could be, the thoughts will drive you nuts. Stay focused on what they were, a drug (nicotine, a very addictive and poisonous chemical in its own right) delivery device that was also delivering thousands of other chemicals, hundreds of which are poisons, 40 of which are known carcinogens, all which combined makes you smell like an ashtray, turns you into a social outcast, and accomplishes all of these life destructive influences for the small cost of thousands of dollars a year.

Again, see cigarettes for what they are and you will be giving thanks for one new component of your life this holiday season, the fact that you have finally attained freedom from tobacco and are able to keep that freedom as long as you never take another puff!

Joel
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improud (golder)
improud (golder)

April 18th, 2001, 3:19 am #20

I wish I could have read this before Easter Sunday. I had smokers in my house. YUCK and was stupid not to tell them not to smoke. I sure did want one, I just went upstairs a million times to get away and of course to make my meal. But it was extremely hard!!! But still Never taken another puff! Thanks Joel
I have been Quit for: 3M 1W 4D 16h 49m 46s. I have NOT smoked 3111, for a savings of $466.65. Life Saved: 1W 3D 19h 15m.
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SunshineRay
SunshineRay

April 30th, 2001, 6:59 am #21

Glad I popped in here to take a look at Glenys post. And very glad Joel dropped in to and left a reply. Was wondering what to do myself tomorrow, when someone is coming over for abit to help me with computer, and he smokes! And next week girlfriend coming down from country to stay 3 to 4 days, big smoker. I know, one hour, one day at a time.

Joels reply and article re: actually watching someone smoke, gave me a whole new perspective on how to look at it. From that perspective I am quite sure it will look like a really ugly and nasty habit. I've been telling anyone who I know personally who has called or been in touch with me over the net .... to have a ciggerette for me! I'm really glad I dropped back in and realize now that that is only reinforcing my mind/body that it wants one! And is very negative and damaging. Will stop asking that as of NOW! And as for the Palmolive bottle, well that was a stunner ........ Thanks for the input. Not so scared now of someone dropping by tommorrow. But shall be sure to tune in here before they arrive.

Glenys ..... go for it, I'm in my 3rd day too

your quit sister
Cheryl
aka sunshineray
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Joel
Joel

May 4th, 2001, 11:08 pm #22

This includes watching smoking spouses.
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Triin (GOLD)
Triin (GOLD)

May 8th, 2001, 7:22 am #23

I thought I'd just share one thing. I had my graduation ceremony from the university on Saturday. Big day, big celebration - and NO urges to smoke. Maybe I wouldn't have realized how free I was feeling unless I hadn't been with one of my friends. We used to spend a lot of time together in the past and she is as heavy smoker as I was in the past. I knew our rythm of "getting the fixes" had been very similar - we smoked on similar times and on similar frequency. Now back to the graduation. We met a few minutes before going in and she sucked that last cigarette fast and deep. Wow her car really stunk! Yak. We went inside to try on cap and gown, and it took about an hour before the actual thing started. She started complaining about wanting a cigarette already then!!! Then it started...Her opportunity to smoke came about 3 hours after her last cigarette. I was fully enjoying the ceremony whereas she was waiting to get a fix. She had to sneak away from parents and family to secretly **** in the nicotine - whereas I was spending time with the people who had came to congradulate me. I know that if I hadn't quit, I would have been in her shoes too. I would have thought about cigarettes half a time! But now...I didn't. I was so occupied that the thought never even crossed my mind. Only she was there to remind me how thankful I am for all of you who have helped me to get free!!! Watching her being in slavery really made me realize even more the value of my quit.

Triin
I have been Quit for: 2M 2W 3D 1h 21m 25s. I have NOT smoked 1561, for a savings of $107.33. Life Saved: 5D 10h 5m.
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Ryan(Gold)
Ryan(Gold)

June 8th, 2001, 1:47 am #24


Joel...You are the Man!!



Thanks for this great article. I too did not realize how much smoke a person consumes off of just one puff. I remember doing the toliet paper trick when I use to smoke and I thought,"Wow that was a lot of smoke!" I didn't realize that only 10% was coming out of my lungs. Now that you have told me this I am very disgusted and am glad that I have been nicotine free for three weeks, two days, 13 hours, 28 minutes and 7 seconds.

Thanks again bud,

Ryan
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Joel
Joel

July 2nd, 2001, 7:26 pm #25

Again just want to make sure everyone is psyched for the upcoming holiday.

Here is the picture from post 16 in this string which will disappear now unless you go back to read the earlier responses. (Which by the way is probably a good idea to do on all of our larger threads. Threads get long because a lot of people found something important in them to respond to. Often those responses as are good and maybe even more important as the original post.)
The Palmolive Bottle smoking demonstration.

Again you can see how the smoke had darkened the bottle after about a few hundred cigarettes. You can start to see how the smoker's lungs below became so discolored. Smokers don't just put a total of a few hundred cigarettes in their system; they literally deliver hundreds of thousands of cigarettes over their shortened lifetime. This discoloration effect is more than just aesthetically unpleasant--it is in fact deadly. See cigarettes as they are and you will always choose to never take another puff!

Joel
Non smokers lung with carbon deposits from pollution
Smokers lung with cancer. White area on top is the cancer, this is what killed the person. The blackened area is just the deposit of tars that all smokers paint into their lungs with every puff they take.
To add a little more perspective to the demonstration, here is another way to see how much tar actually gets into the lungs from smoking. Below is the picture of a smoking machine.
This machine smokes 2,000 cigarettes a day, mimicking smokers puffing patterns to capture equivalent amounts of tar as would a smoker. In one day the machine captures the amount of smoke in the picture below.
This is the same amount a pack a day smoker will paint in his or her lungs in a little over three months. You can see why the lungs are so discolored. But again, the discoloration is a minor issue. It is not that the lungs look altered, it is the fact that there are thousands of chemical being deposited with over 40 that are cancer causing chemicals. Again, keep seeing cigarettes for as they are and your logical choice will be to always never take another puff!
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Joel
Joel

July 4th, 2001, 1:53 am #26

For Trish

As long as I am bringing this one up again, figured I would add another dimension to the story. The bottle above with the tar collected from 2,000 cigarettes. If a dilute form (dilute, not concentrated is as often done in animal experimentation to demostrate that chemicals are carcinogens) of this tar is painted on the skin of mice, 60% of the animals developed cancer of the skin within a year.
Many chemicals currently banned for human consumption were removed from usage if they even caused 5% or less cases of cancer in similar experiments. Cigarette tars contain some of the most carcinogenic chemicals known. Consider this when watching people smoking and exhaling only 10% of the tars they actually take in. Watch them smoke and it will strengthen your resolve to never take another puff!
Joel
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Mari (GOLD)
Mari (GOLD)

July 4th, 2001, 4:42 am #27

Joel, I've always found this thread to be one of the best motivators to keep a quit. The experiment with the Palmolive bottle is a gem. I'd thought of trying to do it myself but I'd probably burn myself, so I'll pass on that. But, it's true that a picture is worth a thousand words, but maybe in my case 206,858 words. That's how many cigarettes I've smoked (at least) in my 28 year smoking history.
I quit when I did 3/09/01 because I was sick, sick of smoking, sick of trying to quit, and sick of relapsing. I was sick and tired of being sick~~and tired. I knew the health risks, but kept right on puffing. Stupid, stupid, stupid, addicted, addicted, addicted!!! But, and this is a very big BUT~~~I sat here re-reading this thread, and looking again, and again at the new pictures you posted, trying to digest the new information without getting sick to my stomach, and I wondered~~If I had seen your post 28 years ago, or even a year ago, would I have quit? Gosh, I want to believe I would have. I don't want to even think I would have been stupid enough to see the damage right in front of me and still **** on cigarettes! Just think, I've sucked the equivalent of that small bottle of goo into my lungs over 103 times!!!! On purpose!!! And, the thing that brings even more tears to my eyes is the fact that members of my family still smoke, and now I won't be able to look at them smoking, or anyone smoking for that matter, without seeing these pictures over and over again. This is a chilling reality!
Thank you for the info. Thank you again for getting all of the latest info for us and for helping us work through our quits with facts. I'll consider having taken the time to read this thread again my gift to myself for having bested the "Terrible Threes" today!! (Which are really the Terrific Threes for me!)
Not one puff...No matter what...Just for today--
---and forever!!!!!
Mari
Three months, three weeks, three days, 21 minutes and 22 seconds. 2319 cigarettes not smoked, saving $414.99. Life saved: 1 week, 1 day, 1 hour, 15 minutes.
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Joel
Joel

July 28th, 2001, 1:20 pm #28

For Treese. Watch the people at the party smoking, one, then another and then another. Soon you will realize they are smoking in a way that you do not want to. They are smoking in a way that they don't want to either. They don't have a choice right now--you do. You can smoke just like them if you want. You can smoke them under the table if you want. You also have the choice of not smoking anything. But there is no in-between choice, not for you or any other recovering nicotine addict.

Consider your true options and your choice will always be to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joel

August 25th, 2001, 7:47 pm #29

I saw where the topic of seeing others smoke was brought up yesterday. I hope that this string helps you learn to watch people with more of a sense of pity than any form of envy. A person stuck in the grip of addiction is no way in an enviable position. To avoid ever being entrapped in such a life of slavery to a drug again always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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earnhardtsrule(gold)
earnhardtsrule(gold)

August 31st, 2001, 12:48 pm #30

great piece,this really helped me,thanks
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wcsdancer (Gold)
wcsdancer (Gold)

December 23rd, 2001, 1:36 am #31

Thanks Joel!! You have left no stone uncovered. Just what I needed...I feel relieved and renewed. *Candy*1month,1week,6days
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

January 6th, 2002, 7:05 pm #32

The Joy of Smoking
Out on the town, you watch as your good friend Bill lights-up and **** down a deliciously deep puff, and then lays the pack on the table between you. Cindy, your talkative co-worker, blows smoke your way while gloriously waving her cigarette like a conductor's baton. Arthur and Denise, two smoking strangers, gravitate toward one and other and engage in lite-hearted conversation while guarding a store's entrance. While stopped at a light, a deep relaxing puff is inhaled by Ellen in the car beside you. "Oh but to again share in the joys of smoking," you think to yourself, "to puff, to taste, to blow, then relax." The joys of smoking???? Joy? Joy?
Yesterday, Bill stepped in a pile of dog dung but failed to notice until he turned around and was puzzled by the strange brown tracks across his sky blue carpet that seemed to lead to his right shoe. Bill's sniffer has been almost useless for over 20 years. A pack and a half a day smoker, he has experienced two cases of pneumonia over the past 3 winters, with the last one putting him in bed for 6 days. Struggling for each breath, Bill still managed to smoke a couple each day. His doctor has pleaded with him to quit but after a half dozen failed attempts, discouragement fills his mind.
Cindy's two teenage sons are onto her almost daily about her smoking. They can't walk anywhere as a family without her cigarette smoke finding the boys. When it does, they make her want to crawl into a hole as they both start coughing and gaging as if dying. When smoking, they never walk together, it's either ahead or behind for lonely mom. She dreads the seven hour drive to her parent's house next week, but she can no longer make excuses for visiting only once in 3 years. Cindy knows that they'll pass three rest areas along the interstate but it will be difficult to fib about having to go to the bathroom at all three. Two will have to do.
She skips making breakfast to ensure that the boys will demand that they stop to eat along the way. Cindy shakes her head after coming back in from loading up the car. Not only does she have a cigarette in her hand, the ashtray on the table is smoking one too. Before leaving town she stops to fill up with gas while managing three quick puffs, as she feels far more secure after stuffing two new packs into her purse.
Arthur, a 54 year old 3 pack a day smoker, has large cell lung cancer in the right lobe. The slow growing tumor is now almost 6 months old and a little bigger than an orange. Arthur doesn't yet know. Although he has twice coughed up a small bit of bloody mucus, he quickly dismissed it both times. Frankly, he just doesn't want to know. There is a bit of chest pain but that's nothing new, as chest tightness has occurred on and off for the past couple of years. Additional thick bloody mucus will soon scare Arthur into a doctor visit and a chest x-ray. The delay will cost him a lung. Over the next 3 years he will battle hard to save his life. In the end, he will lose.
A workaholic, Ellen has done very well financially. Her life seems to have everything except for companionship. A three pack a day smoker, she constantly smells like a walking tobacco factory and often turns heads and noses when she walks into a room. A serious chain-smoker, she tells those around her that she enjoys her cigarettes. Deep down, she believes that she just can't quit. Her car windows, house blinds and forehead continually share a common guest - a thin oily film of tar and other chemicals. Ellen has a date next Friday, a two pack a day smoker named Ed.
Denise started smoking at age 13 while her lungs were still developing. Constantly clearing her throat, her breathing capacity continues to slowly deteriorate. Smoking wrinkles above and below her lips make her look far older than her 32 years. Fifteen pounds over weight to begin with, Denise successfully quit for almost 3 weeks, before throwing in the towel when she notice that she'd outgrown her entire wardrobe. Two months later, still depressed over her defeat, the new weight remains with her. Already on high-blood pressure medication, she is about to become a regular user of anti-depressants. Fortunately for Denise, a friend will tell her about an on-line support group called Freedom, where she will soon taste victory over her addiction while receiving lots of wonderful advice about controlling her weight.
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long, YQB John : )
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Barb H (Bronze)
Barb H (Bronze)

February 7th, 2002, 9:34 am #33

Hi Joel!

How horrible!! Hard to believe that I was doing that to my lungs. Thank you for these photos. I have printed them and have them on my bulletin board to remind me to never be tempted watching others smoke.

Barb H
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lenguatron (green)
lenguatron (green)

February 7th, 2002, 9:39 am #34

This thread is EXCELLENT! I logged on to Freedom tonight, intending to lament about how I'm getting ready to face a big test.
I've been luckier than most during this quit, because for the entire time, I've stayed with my parents, both of whom have quit smoking. I don't have any friends here, because they moved here after I left home to go to college. So I've been in a totally non-smoking environment, apart from passing by a few miserable souls shivering in front of public buildings.
Tomorrow I'm driving back to school--a 13-hour drive. The drive I'm looking forward to. My car smells good, I smell good, and I won't feel sick with a sore throat when I get home. (When I was a smoker, I smoked more on road trips, and would always get a sore throat.)
But it is with trepidation that I go to see the friends I dearly love and miss. My friends, who unfortunately smoke. I live with my brother and a roommate there--both of whom smoke. Fortunately, they stopped smoking in the apartment.
So before I read this thread I was all worried about going back to Austin. I was afraid that seeing my friends smoke would make me want to smoke. But now, I've got that Palmolive bottle and the tar-encrusted cancer lung in my brain. I'm really going to be glad I'm not the smoker. And maybe, just maybe, they'll be looking at ME, thinking, "She looks like she's really enjoying not smoking! I wish I could do that!" And then maybe they'll be on here...
THANK YOU AGAIN, FREEDOM!
YQS, Mary

Free and lovin' it for one month, 5 days, 20 hours... saved about 2 1/2 days of life already!
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Joel
Joel

April 18th, 2002, 8:02 pm #35

The Palmolive Bottle smoking demonstration.

Again you can see how the smoke had darkened the bottle after about a few hundred cigarettes. You can start to see how the smoker's lungs below became so discolored. Smokers don't just put a total of a few hundred cigarettes in their system; they literally deliver hundreds of thousands of cigarettes over their shortened lifetime. This discoloration effect is more than just aesthetically unpleasant--it is in fact deadly.

This picture looks like it was an exhalation after about 10 previous exhalations, not that much is seen in this particular photo. I normally get a tremendous amount of smoke out of the bottle with every drag, normally we can smoke up a room with one cigarette. If you look at the mouthpiece of the bottle, it is almost solid brown with tar. It used to be clear. I have used this bottle with somewhere between 300 and 400 cigarettes. While that may sound like a lot, most people smokemore than that in any given month. Even the bottle is pretty yellow and I blow out almost all of the smoke used when it inhales. The bottle is dry allowing me to do this, your lungs are moist trapping most of the tars when inhaled. Literally over 90% of the tar that is inhaled stays in the lung, when you see a person exhale they are literally blowing out about 10% of the smoke.

When viewed this way, even one puff seems disgusting to most people. While the bottle may appear brown from just a few hundred cigarettes, lungs get browner and the discoloration poses much more than just a risk of looking bad. The 4,000 chemicals that turn the lungs brown are downright deadly, as can be seen in the photos below.


Non smokers lung with carbon deposits from pollution
Smokers lung with cancer. White area on top is the cancer,
this is what killed the person. The blackened area is just the
deposit of tars that all smokers paint into their lungs
with every puff they take.
To add a little more perspective to the demonstration, here is another way to see how much tar actually gets into the lungs from smoking. Below is the picture of a smoking machine.
This machine smokes 2,000 cigarettes a day, mimicking smokers puffing patterns to capture equivalent amounts of tar as would a smoker. In one day the machine captures the amount of smoke in the picture below.
This is the same amount a pack a day smoker will paint in his or her lungs in a little over three months. You can see why the lungs are so discolored. But again, the discoloration is a minor issue. It is not that the lungs look altered, it is the fact that there are thousands of chemical being deposited with over 40 that are cancer causing chemicals. Again, keep seeing cigarettes for as they are and your logical choice will be to always never take another puff!
As long as I am bringing this one up again, figured I would add another dimension to the story. The bottle above with the tar collected from 2,000 cigarettes. If a dilute form (dilute, not concentrated is as often done in animal experimentation to demostrate that chemicals are carcinogens) of this tar is painted on the skin of mice, 60% of the animals developed cancer of the skin within a year.
Many chemicals currently banned for human consumption were removed from usage if they even caused 5% or less cases of cancer in similar experiments. Cigarette tars contain some of the most carcinogenic chemicals known. Consider this when watching people smoking and exhaling only 10% of the tars they actually take in. Watch them smoke and it will strengthen your resolve to never take another puff!
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