Be prepared to hear some confusing information

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

02 Jan 2002, 22:30 #11

I didn't see this first hand but it was just told to me. The Today Show had on a smoking cessation "expert" telling people definately not to go cold turkey, to use quitting aids and cutdown, and that if you fall down just get right back up. I was also told another expert said that you can't quit the first time, it takes numerous times to quit. Thought I'd better bring up this string to address these concerns. I suspect there will be a few more days of this kind of information being reported before these people get back to their day jobs.

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

14 Nov 2002, 21:57 #12

I think Bob brought up this piece in part to support the discussion that was going on in the string Doctor's wordly advice!!!???. Although we probably should be prepared soon for an onslaught of this kind of misinformation since the Great American Smokeout is just one week from today.

When it comes down to it though the Great American Smokeout is just another day to our membership. Sure it is a day where our members swear not to take a cigarette, but this should be of no surprise and has no connotation of being a daunting task--it is the same vow that our members took yesterday, today, tomorrow and the other six days leading to the smokeout. Also important to note is that our members will have the same commitment the day after the smokeout and every day following that day too.

For our members know that quitting smoking is not contingent on just making it smoke free on special occasions, but rather that being able to stay smoke free is only possible by recognizing that each and every day he or she must stay totally committed to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

27 Dec 2002, 21:43 #13

It is time to get ready for the possible New Years media assault on how to quit smoking. While this piece was written for the Great American Smokeout, New Years is when there is actually more coverage on smoking and quitting issues, and thus it is more likely that a lot of contradictory information will be disseminated. Don't get confused by the "facts" and don't lose sight of the real way to quit and prevent relapse permanently--it is as simple and inexpensive as just knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

27 Dec 2002, 22:29 #14

The neo-nicotine pushers are out in force right now and in some cases they're not even telling nicotine addicts viewing their television commercials that behind their product's hopeful new names - like Commit - is nothing more than more nicotine. Sadly, the viewer's brain dopamine reward pathways are already Committed to nicotine and what they need is a bit of time away from nicotine so that their reward pathways can begin to sense that life without nicotine is not only possible but healthier and happier.

Those pushing nicotine via the patch are out in force too. Let me share a portion of a nicotine patch news story that went out across news wires an hour ago ...
"A new study suggests that nicotine patches alone are helpful in helping people give up smoking ...

They had a group of 567 male and female heavy smokers receive either a real nicotine patch or a placebo patch. They found that nearly 20 per cent of the active patch users quit completely after seven days, compared to around seven per cent in the placebo group.

Quit completely? On average you've got a pack-a-day nicotine addict who was used to smoking 20 mg. of nicotine a day now receiving 21 mg. of nicotine a day via a patch. What have they completely quit? Amazing!

There is absolutely no reason to believe that the "real-world" use of any NRT product will produce results different from those stated in the below medical study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) on September 11, 2002. Keep in mind that the patch is competing below against uneducated cold turkey quitters who have been taught almost nothing about how to take the "cold" out of cold turkey quitting. What a waste of a golden opportunity!


JAMA 2002 Sep 11;288(10):1260-4
Impact of over-the-counter sales on effectiveness of pharmaceutical aids for smoking cessation.

Pierce JP, Gilpin EA.

Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Cancer Center, 0645, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0645, USA. jppierce@ucsd.edu

CONTEXT: Successful smoking cessation is a major public health goal. In controlled clinical trials, nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) and the antidepressant bupropion have been shown to significantly increase cessation rates only for moderate to heavy smokers (> or = 15 cigarettes/d). Nicotine replacement therapy is heavily promoted to the general population by both the pharmaceutical industry and tobacco control advocates.
OBJECTIVE: To examine trends in smoking cessation, pharmaceutical cessation aid use, and success in cessation in the general California population.
DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: The large population-based California Tobacco Surveys of 1992, 1996, and 1999, including 5247 (71.3% response rate), 9725 (72.9% response rate), and 6412 (68.4% response rate) respondents, respectively. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Rates of cessation attempts (> or = 1 day) among smokers in the last year, use of pharmaceutical aids (mostly over-the-counter products since 1996), and cessation success.
RESULTS: Between 1992 and 1999, cessation attempts among California smokers increased 61.4% (from 38.1% to 61.5%), and NRT use among quitters increased 50.5% (from 9.3% to 14.0%). A total of 17.2% of quitters used NRT, an antidepressant, or both as an aid to cessation in 1999. In 1996 and 1999, the median duration of aid use (14 days) was much less than recommended, and only about 20% of users had adjuvant one-on-one or group behavioral counseling. Use of NRT increased short-term cessation success in moderate to heavy smokers in each survey year. However, a long-term cessation advantage was only observed before NRT became widely available over-the-counter (August 1996). In 1999, no advantage for pharmaceutical aid users was observed in either the short or long term for the nearly 60% of California smokers classified as light smokers (<15 cigarettes/d).
CONCLUSION: Since becoming available over the counter, NRT appears no longer effective in increasing long-term successful cessation in California smokers.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

27 Dec 2002, 22:33 #15

Also note--big news item--7 days. Not that I want to minimize seven days for our people getting through one week today. But for research purposes, seven days success rates are not saying a whole lot. Again, this is not "news worthy" material.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

28 Dec 2002, 00:15 #16

Here is an example of some useful and significant information getting distorted by a sales pitch for NRT. If you analyze the comment on pharmaceutical aids, the recommendation is that EVERYONE who quits should use these products.
I bet all of our members are feeling foolish now quitting without this stuff--especially all of our six month or one year and even longer-term ex-smokers who hardly think about cigarettes at all anymore. Just think how much more successful and easier your life would now be if you would have been following this great advice. I bet some of you would still be having great success at trying to control your pharmaceutical aids.
The bulk of this article is good though, and ties in well with the strings I Will Quit When... and Waiting to Bottom Out.
Millions of U.S. Smokers Ignore Warnings

Wed Dec 25, 9:37 AM ET
By RANDOLPH E. SCHMID, Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON - Despite suffering from chronic lung and other ailments, millions of Americans ignore warnings from their physicians and continue smoking.[/size]

A study by the federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality found that nearly 38 percent of people with the chronic lung disease emphysema still smoke, as do almost 25 percent of those with asthma.[/size][/size]

And the agency said Tuesday that the patients continued smoking even though at least 60 percent of them said they had been told by a doctor to stop within the last year.[/size]

The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that about 15 million Americans suffer from asthma. The American Lung Association estimates the number may be as high as 17.7 million, with an additional 2.8 million suffering from emphysema.[/size]

The agency's Dr. Steven B. Cohen said the data will allow researchers to detect trends and determine whether people with chronic illnesses continue to smoke in large numbers in coming years. AHRQ is the government's lead agency for research on health care quality, costs, outcomes and patient safety.[/size]

"We're trying to assess the individuals who are current smokers and get a sense of whether, in the past 12 months, they have been advised to quit," Cohen said.[/size]

The findings were no surprise to Dr. Norman H. Edelman. "We see people like that all the time," the Long Island physician said.[/size]

"What it points out is nicotine is a true addiction, just like being addicted to heroin or cocaine or other narcotics. You are perfectly aware of deleterious effects but it's hard to break an addiction," said Edelman, who teaches at the State University of New York at Stony Brook.[/size]

The findings, part of a statistical brief on smoking, were issued without discussion by the Health and Human Services agency.[/size]

The report also noted that 20 percent of people with high blood pressure or heart problems continue to smoke, as do 18.5 percent of people with diabetes, diseases that affect millions more Americans.[/size]

Cohen said that the overall statistics on the number of adults who smoke are similar to other studies, but those studies haven't looked specifically at people with chronic illnesses.[/size]

Edelman, who serves as a spokesman for the American Lung Association, said that in addition to the problems of quitting smoking, some people who develop disease take the attitude that the damage is already done so they may as well continue to enjoy cigarettes.[/size]

But, he stressed, research has shown that it's always beneficial to stop smoking.[/size]

"Physicians have to be much more active in helping people quit," he said. "They have to recommend programs, they have to monitor programs, make sure patients are using pharmaceutical aids to quit. In general, we believe physicians should play a more active role" in helping people quit.[/size]

The new findings are based on a self-administered questionnaire given to 15,661 adults in late 2000 and early 2001 as part of an effort to evaluate their health care.[/size]

Overall, the report found that 23.1 percent of adult Americans smoke. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported earlier that 23.3 percent were smokers in 2000, down from 25 percent in 1993.[/size]

The new study found the lowest smoking rates among Hispanics, 16.8 percent. By comparison 23.6 percent of non-Hispanic blacks smoke, as do 23.8 percent of non-Hispanic whites and other persons.[/size]

As other studies have shown, people who didn't finish high school are more likely to smoke than those who graduated, 32.8 percent compared to 15.8 percent.[/size]

And, at 54.6 percent, men made up more than half of smokers.[/size]
Last edited by Joel on 12 Apr 2009, 07:13, edited 1 time in total.
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AuntBea (Silver)
Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 00:33

28 Dec 2002, 00:18 #17

This might not be the best place to put this--but I just had to share as I found the story rather amazing!
Last night I called my 87 year old Grandma to let her know that I had quit smoking. She was just tickled about it, and told me the following story:
Her brother, who is married to a registered nurse, had been a heavy smoker since he was a child. His wife was fairly certain that he was having a heart attack, and drove him to the hospital. When they got there, he requested that she park the car while he had a quick smoke before going in! Needless to say, she didn't let him, and when she related the incident to the doctor after the crisis was over, he stated that had he had the cigarette, it most likely would have killed him.
According to Grandma, her brother only has 1/2 lung left. He quit smoking 8 years ago. He has been addicted to Nicorette gum since then. He will get up in the night to chew his fix. He chews it all day long. It has caused sores in his mouth and on his tongue, and caused him a great deal of dental problems, but he cannot give it up.
Grandma is glad, however, that he is no longer stinking up the place. She just wonders how long it will be before they start having to cut off pieces of his mouth, and what he will do then. Perhaps the patch? Apparently he has received some really good medical advice.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

28 Dec 2002, 07:20 #18

AuntBea, it's hard to say how many of the participants in these NRT studies actually end up still nicotine dependent and fully adjusted to getting their nicotine from a new delivery device, as very few studies actually keep such records. Like your great-uncle and the article Joel presented, it only goes to show how captivating this substance really can be upon the untrained mind. Glad he listened to your great-aunt! It must be nice having a nurse in the family : )
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

06 Mar 2003, 04:45 #19

While there are times when confusing information is release in massive amounts, generally there is always a little bit of misinformation released in little articles and news stories here and there. I truly believe we would have a lot more ex-smokers in the world today if not so much misinformation on how to quit was out there.

By the way, I think I saw somewhere that Tuesday, March 12 is National No Smoking Day in the United Kingdom. I am not sorry that we will be missing the flood of media hype here considering I have a clinic going who does not need to be bombarded by the nonsense that will likely be generated. But for all of our friends in the United Kingdom, just remember that every day is a no smoking day for you as long as every day you remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

31 May 2003, 11:40 #20

World No Tobacco Day, like the Great American Smokeout and No Smoking Day, has been bought and paid for by pharmaceutical company contributions to major health non-profit organizations. It doesn't mean this opportunity isn't "real" or "possible" it just means that folks with money want more money by charging you to lengthen how long it takes to recover. Think about it this way... if your brain dopamine reward pathways truly are chemically married to nicotine when does the healing and adjustment period commence?
In helping you decide the above, we invite you to read a March 2003 study by paid pharmaceutical industry consultants that took all the over-the-counter (OTC) nicotine gum and patch (NRT) studies conducted to date, that were capable of being combined and averaged, and concluded that 93% of all patch and gum users in studies relapsed to smoking within six months. Of the 7% still not smoking, an unrevealed percentage remained permanently dependent and hooked upon the nicotine device being tested. Is this really what you want? Is this really the best you can expect? Here's three links that support and present the above assertion.
Last edited by John (Gold) on 12 Apr 2009, 07:14, edited 1 time in total.
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