Be Prepared: those we love are destined to die

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

29 Sep 2002, 21:54 #11

Hello Lilac:

I was putting this one up not only because it was about death of loved ones, but it is really about how under the most adverse of conditions, not smoking is still possible and imperative to preserve the ex-smokers health. It could have easily been an article about loss of a job, a house, the moving of a friend, or countless other life changing issues. But people understand that death of a loved one is likely the most severe loss a person will ever experience so it puts all of the other losses in perspective. If you can survive the death of those closest to you without a cigarette--you can survive all other losses too. You can survive everything smoke free as long as you know to never take another puff!

Joel
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

22 Oct 2002, 10:23 #12

You and your family are in our prayers MareBear Image
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Triin (GOLD)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

23 Oct 2002, 19:29 #13

I wanted to tell my sad story again to make people realize you can get through anything without relapsing, without starting to smoke again. I'm 23 years old. I had been smoking for 5 years. I have been quit now for 1Y 8M. My mom committed suicide after many years of depression on May 2nd. The pain after that has been unbearable. I love her so much! And I haven't started smoking although life has been more than hard on me. I'm just smarter than that - smoking would not make me feel better.

Love,
Triin

I have been Quit for: 1Y 8M 2D 14h 27m 39s. I have NOT smoked 12232, for a savings of $840.95. Life Saved: 1M 1W 4D 11h 20m.
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Doris
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:33

21 Jan 2003, 21:10 #14

I lost my bro in law on the day I made green. i thought about smoking but knew it wouldn't change a thing except for my quit date and knowing I want to be an ex-smoker i would have to go through those 72 hrs again, would not be able to post on this site and i just was not willing to start over . so One day at a time I don't smoke the services for him was on Sunday and It was all okay I have been very depressed and sleeping a lot to keep from thinking, but ai made it without taking a puff, today is the first day I have felt better and got on the pc but I know I am far from being okay with his death but I do know I don't have to take puff , ever, That is my choice. I thank u all for the post and words of concern , QSS Doris
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

10 Mar 2003, 11:49 #15

Relapse is a killer!
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Triin (GOLD)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

11 Mar 2003, 15:48 #16

I'm still here :) I've been quit for over two years. Life has been hard but I'm starting to find joy again :) I'm very glad that I do not smoke!

Love,
Triin
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richard This is It GOLD
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

13 Apr 2003, 13:05 #17

I am now being tested.......Image


Thank you, Joel, for your writings.... (and everyone else)

I will NEVER take another puff....
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Joanne Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

15 Aug 2003, 04:22 #18

When we initially quit smoking we often wonder how strong we would be during a time crisis or horrific tragedy, if we could really refrain from smoking. This is why we must take things one day at a time and really understand our addiction. Impending doom for relapse can even cause some smokers to never quit. It is important that we understand that strength has nothing to do with relapse during difficult times. Who would feel strong and comfortable while looking closely into the face of tragedy? Knowledge and commitment keep our quits alive and well, not our emotions and strength.

Recently tragedy struck at home. I am shocked and in a sort of a surreal mode here. Not once did smoking occur to me except for watching those still trapped within this addiction. Even if I had longed to join those in the smoking whirlwind just for the sake of camaraderie amongst loved ones, it would have been knowledge that kept me from doom.

I clearly understand the law of addiction and you should, too. I haven't smoked for almost five years and some might say that at this point it must be the comfort that keeps me safe. It is much more than that, a lesson I learned the hard way where ignorance destroyed a six year quit. Take heed, a lesson in which you should learn from the mistakes of others, rather than your own.

We may never be prepared for what lies ahead but we can still be assured that we each have a quit100% guaranteed free of relapse, all we have to do is NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF. (and don't forget, we do that one day at a time)

JoanneImage
Last edited by Joanne Gold on 11 Oct 2010, 19:43, edited 2 times in total.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

18 Dec 2003, 08:51 #19

 
Over the years we've seen many members lose close loved ones and not use their passing as an excuse for chemical relapse. If death is a legitimate reason for relapse then we need to turn off the lights right now and close Freedom's doors because if we plan on living a full life then we're each almost certain to lose someone close.

Regardless of the nature or gravity of any challenge life throws our way, adding chemical relapse to the challenge makes absolutely no sense at all. The next few minutes are all any of us can control and each will always be entirely doable. Only one rule, no nicotine today!
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long! John
Last edited by John (Gold) on 11 Oct 2010, 19:43, edited 2 times in total.
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Rickgoldx5
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

18 Dec 2003, 23:05 #20

ImageThank You for this bump John, it always gets me.
Rick
One year, seven months, two weeks, 1 hour, 50 minutes and 9 seconds. 47446 cigarettes not smoked, saving $11,838.64. Life saved: 23 weeks, 3 days, 17 hours, 50 minutes.
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